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Pics of cold


STEVE IN SO CAL
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Those of you in tropical areas may wish to avert your eyes.

I turned my avocado irrigation on about 2230 last night.

These are some pics of ice that formed, and this is up near the house, on top of the hill...

Ph Rupicola

IMG_0225.jpg

Para Tortor seedlings (rabbit wire solid ice)

IMG_0227.jpg

If global warming means I can grow Cocos Nucifera, then bring it on....

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Ph Rupicolas on left, Para Tortor on right

IMG_0226.jpg

Close up Rupies

IMG_0228.jpg

If global warming means I can grow Cocos Nucifera, then bring it on....

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Not sure if my hands were shaking, or camera was cold, things are blurry..sorry

agaves

IMG_0229.jpg

agave attenuataIMG_0230.jpg

If global warming means I can grow Cocos Nucifera, then bring it on....

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Wow, That looks cold for sure!! Do you have got rain and frost at the same time ?

Could survive the Phoenix rupicola that ? because your tempeture was very low ?

Robbin

Southwest

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so this is self inflicted? ive always heard its good to irrigate in the case of a radiational freeze but, as we dont often get radiational freezes Ive not had the chance to try it.  not to mention that id be way to affraid of causing more damage.  

any idea how this is going to turn out?

Allen

Galveston Island Tx

9a/9b

8' Elevation

Sandy Soil

Jan Avgs 50/62

Jul Avgs 80/89

Average Annual Rainfall 43.5"

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(Exotic Life @ Jan. 14 2007,10:14)

QUOTE
Wow, That looks cold for sure!! Do you have got rain and frost at the same time ?

Could survive the Phoenix rupicola that ? because your tempeture was very low ?

Robbin

Robbin...it's from the irrigation that I turned on last night.

If global warming means I can grow Cocos Nucifera, then bring it on....

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(STEVE IN SO CAL @ Jan. 14 2007,10:17)

QUOTE

(Exotic Life @ Jan. 14 2007,10:14)

QUOTE
Wow, That looks cold for sure!! Do you have got rain and frost at the same time ?

Could survive the Phoenix rupicola that ? because your tempeture was very low ?

Robbin

Robbin...it's from the irrigation that I turned on last night.

Steve,

And this helps to protect the plants, you see here sometimes in the early spring when the expect frost. Some farmers give a lot of water on the flowers form the apple tree's ... because the water is freezing not the flowers ... so that's the way to keep the flowers in a good condition ... but works dat also with palms?

Robbin

Southwest

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Looks painful Steve.  Hope your efforts work.  Look forward to seeing how the plants react, especially the Parajubaea and P. rupicola.

Robert

Madera, CA (central San Joaquin valley)

9A

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Wow! Keep us posted Steve on how things worked out. We're susceptible to cold snaps here as well and I've never been through that kind of event yet, so watching and learning.

Roger

Royal Palm Beach, FL.

USDA Zone 10A/10B Subtropical

26.7 degrees N. latitude

10 miles West of West Palm Beach and the ocean

Avg. yearly rainfall 58 inches

:cool:

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I'm an expert however, on hurricanes, with three of them under my belt now.  :(

Royal Palm Beach, FL.

USDA Zone 10A/10B Subtropical

26.7 degrees N. latitude

10 miles West of West Palm Beach and the ocean

Avg. yearly rainfall 58 inches

:cool:

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Steve,

That's pretty disturbing.  This must be rough for you, but there is one possible positive I can think of.  If your nursery palms make it through this, you will have a much larger market for selling them later one...safe down to the teens works for a whole lot of places.

Matt

San Diego

0.6 Acres of a south facing, gently sloped dirt pile, soon to be impenetrable jungle

East of Mount Soledad, in the biggest cold sink in San Diego County.

Zone 10a (I hope), Sunset 24

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Steve

The LA Times has photos of the same thing on lemon/avocado groves in Ojai.  Apparently this is a common technique used by farmers but I have been warned not to water during cold weather.

Recorded 37F minimum.  Currently 41F.

Tonight the wind will pick up & keep temps above freezing except in wind-sheltered areas.

Los Angeles/Pasadena

34° 10' N   118° 18' W

Elevation: 910'/278m

January Average Hi/Lo: 69F/50F

July Average Hi/Lo: 88F/66F

Average Rainfall: 19"/48cm

USDA 11/Sunset 23

http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/queryF?MTW

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Wow! Keep us posted Steve on how things worked out. We're susceptible to cold snaps here as well and I've never been through that kind of event yet, so watching and learning.

Roger

Roger,

where you are you really don't have to worry too much about THAT kind of cold. The last time anything even close to that happening down there was in 89 I think... I was living in Tamarac and I recorded 34f

Bobby

Long Island, New York  Zone 7a (where most of the southern Floridians are originally from)

AVERAGE TEMPS

Summer Highs  : 85-90f/day,  68-75f / night

Winter Lows     : 38-45f/day,   25-35f / night

Extreme Low    : 10-20f/day,    0-10f / night   but VERY RARE

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Hi Bobby,

Miami International Airport hit 29F in 1989.  John Bishock, who lived near Fairchild, said it was 26F at the garden that year.  In an extreme cold event, the only place immune from freezing temps on the peninsula are the Keys.  The all time low in Key West is 41F.

Ray

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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Wow .... that's not pretty. Here's my damage report from the low of 24 last night.

archonto pupurea leaf damage:

purpurea.jpg

one of two ptychosperma elegans looks dead

ptychospermaelaegans.jpg

caryota gigas with major leaf damage

gigas1.jpg

gigascloseup.jpg

other non-palms got hit hard too...

Dave

 

Riverside, CA Z 9b

1700 ft. elevation

approx 40 miles inland

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(BobbyinNY @ Jan. 14 2007,11:44)

QUOTE
Wow! Keep us posted Steve on how things worked out. We're susceptible to cold snaps here as well and I've never been through that kind of event yet, so watching and learning.

Roger

Roger,

where you are you really don't have to worry too much about THAT kind of cold. The last time anything even close to that happening down there was in 89 I think... I was living in Tamarac and I recorded 34f

Bobby,

That 89 event is exactly what I was refering to. I was still living in SoCal and was back here at my folks for Christmas when that hit. Maybe I'm mistaken, but I thought it got into the upper 20's here in West Palm Beach. I know it fried tons of stuff in my folks yard and well, just about everywhere around here. While it is rare, it has happened. Many of the older palms still bear the shrunken in trunk from that cold snap. Hope it never happens again, but if it does, maybe I'll have some ideas on how best to nurse my stuff through it. Tamarac is a ways further south of me and I am in the western suburbs of WPB, so I'm going to get a little colder than there.

Roger

Royal Palm Beach, FL.

USDA Zone 10A/10B Subtropical

26.7 degrees N. latitude

10 miles West of West Palm Beach and the ocean

Avg. yearly rainfall 58 inches

:cool:

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Don't the citrus growers turn the sprinklers on just as the temps in the grove hit 32F?  I've heard that if you turn them on too soon it's just as bad as too late.

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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redlands, at least one spot 22F.  198something(3, 9?)

Alan

Steve, do you need a hanky.  Sleeve will work fine.   Just tell people you ate something hot, or got kicked in the stones. (Kinda did I guess) Anyway, holding out for a spot of good news after the icing has all melted down, maybe your cake was not left out in the rain, but Oh, No!

Good Luck

Alan

Tampa, Florida

Zone - 10a

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(Ray, Tampa @ Jan. 14 2007,12:05)

QUOTE
Don't the citrus growers turn the sprinklers on just as the temps in the grove hit 32F?  I've heard that if you turn them on too soon it's just as bad as too late.

Ray,

From what I understand ice irrigation (WATERING) is a very tricky thing.

The concept is to freeze the water around the plant tissue to try and keep it at 32 degrees F.

However there are many factors involved that play into the equation.

Evaporation is the critical thing,just turning on the water and icing up the plant will usually do more harm, than doing nothing.

The one thing I know,is that if you turn on the water, it is critical to continue the irrigation, until the ice actually starts to melt,and is falling off the plants!

Here is a good link describing this type of COLD protection!

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/hil-705.html

Scott

Titusville, FL

1/2 mile from the Indian River

USDA Zone COLD

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Steve,

I did that with my sprinklers in the 1990 California freeze. Having lost hundreds of small Howeas in a previous freeze I figured I had nothing to loose. My icicles were not quite as long as yours but were still a good 4-5 inches. And to my surprise the Howeas were completely undamaged.

I am very curious to know how the different species handled the ice. I am betting if you didn't do that, the smaller more tender stuff would be fried this morning.

animated-volcano-image-0010.gif.71ccc48bfc1ec622a0adca187eabaaa4.gif

Kona, on The Big Island
Hawaii - Land of Volcanoes

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So far nothing damaged but tip burn will show up soon.  Stayed in upper 30's in LA so I guess we came out OK  :P

Here a few looks this cold morning in California :

P4220052.jpg

P4220042.jpg

P4220040.jpg

P4220019.jpg

Los Angeles/Pasadena

34° 10' N   118° 18' W

Elevation: 910'/278m

January Average Hi/Lo: 69F/50F

July Average Hi/Lo: 88F/66F

Average Rainfall: 19"/48cm

USDA 11/Sunset 23

http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/queryF?MTW

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I turned the irrigation off at noon, still had ice in shady spots. Not sure if I should do it again tonight...only supposed to be 2 degrees warmer.

If global warming means I can grow Cocos Nucifera, then bring it on....

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Ray-

I was under the impression that 30F was the all time low MIA hit in recorded times. WPB recorded 27F, and FLL recorded 29F. Miami Beach hit 32F once, and Key Largo hit 35F in 1989, not to say there was not frost. Once you head south for a bit past Coral Gables, the peninsula goes back inland (away from the Gulf Stream) and temps actually go down instead of up. I have heard of the stories of some nurseries west of Khrome Ave (SW177AVE) that hit 18F! I bet the SE coast of Florida from south Palm Beach County to Key Biscayne has never seen frost on the barrier islands, especially south Broward/north Dade where there are so many canals encompassing houses.

I know that here in 1983, it hit 23F, it hit 27F in 85, and in 1989 it hit 25F. 1983 was worse for the West Coast. Libby Besse, a long time IPS member has lived on Siesta Key since 1969 and she said she hit 29F there once in 1983. Just comes to show that most of the time it is how close you are to the water and not how far south you are in Florida, especially the West Coast.

Anyways, I hope everyone hit by this frost is able to recover as many palms as possible.

Christian Faulkner

Venice, Florida - South Sarasota County.

www.faulknerspalms.com

 

Μολὼν λάβε

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(Ray, Tampa @ Jan. 14 2007,11:58)

QUOTE
Hi Bobby,

Miami International Airport hit 29F in 1989.  John Bishock, who lived near Fairchild, said it was 26F at the garden that year.  In an extreme cold event, the only place immune from freezing temps on the peninsula are the Keys.  The all time low in Key West is 41F.

Ray

Yahoo Weather shows the all time record low for MIA as 32F.  I was under the impression that was taken at the airport.  I realize outlying areas got a lot colder.

http://weather.yahoo.com/climo/USFL0316_f.html

Month Avg. High Avg. Low Avg. Precip. Rec. High Rec. Low

January 73.0° F 63.0° F 2.44 in 86.0°

(01/28/1964)

32.0° F

(01/20/1977)  

February 73.0° F 63.0° F 2.14 in 88.0°

(02/13/1982)

 37.0° F

(02/05/1996)

 

March 75.0° F 66.0° F 2.20 in 92.0°

(03/22/1977)

 32.0° F

(03/03/1980)

 

April 79.0° F 70.0° F 2.81 in 94.0°

(04/25/1971)

 46.0° F

(04/05/1987)

 

May 82.0° F 74.0° F 4.90 in 95.0°

(05/27/1974)

 58.0° F

(05/08/1992)

 

June 86.0° F 77.0° F 6.90 in 97.0°

(06/04/1985)

 65.0° F

(06/05/1967)

 

July 87.0° F 78.0° F 3.63 in 93.0°

(07/01/2000)

 70.0° F

(07/01/1975)

 

August 87.0° F 78.0° F 5.44 in 98.0°

(08/26/1958)

 67.0° F

(08/06/1982)

 

September 86.0° F 78.0° F 6.31 in 96.0°

(09/10/1973)

 67.0° F

(09/18/1985)

 

October 83.0° F 75.0° F 4.53 in 95.0°

(10/03/1977)

 54.0° F

(10/21/1989)

 

November 78.0° F 70.0° F 3.32 in 90.0°

(11/01/1969)

 39.0° F

(11/25/1970)

 

December 75.0° F 65.0° F 1.98 in 86.0°

(12/20/1948)

32.0° F

(12/24/1989)

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(cfkingfish @ Jan. 14 2007,19:13)

QUOTE
Ray-

I was under the impression that 30F was the all time low MIA hit in recorded times. WPB recorded 27F, and FLL recorded 29F. Miami Beach hit 32F once, and Key Largo hit 35F in 1989, not to say there was not frost. Once you head south for a bit past Coral Gables, the peninsula goes back inland (away from the Gulf Stream) and temps actually go down instead of up. I have heard of the stories of some nurseries west of Khrome Ave (SW177AVE) that hit 18F! I bet the SE coast of Florida from south Palm Beach County to Key Biscayne has never seen frost on the barrier islands, especially south Broward/north Dade where there are so many canals encompassing houses.

I know that here in 1983, it hit 23F, it hit 27F in 85, and in 1989 it hit 25F. 1983 was worse for the West Coast. Libby Besse, a long time IPS member has lived on Siesta Key since 1969 and she said she hit 29F there once in 1983. Just comes to show that most of the time it is how close you are to the water and not how far south you are in Florida, especially the West Coast.

Anyways, I hope everyone hit by this frost is able to recover as many palms as possible.

WPB 24

Pompano Beach 21(?)

And I have heard stories where it has gotten as cold or colder in south Florida.

Brevard County, Fl

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