Jump to content
  • WELCOME GUEST

    It looks as if you are viewing PalmTalk as an unregistered Guest.

    Please consider registering so as to take better advantage of our vast knowledge base and friendly community.  By registering you will gain access to many features - among them are our powerful Search feature, the ability to Private Message other Users, and be able to post and/or answer questions from all over the world. It is completely free, no “catches,” and you will have complete control over how you wish to use this site.

    PalmTalk is sponsored by the International Palm Society. - an organization dedicated to learning everything about and enjoying palm trees (and their companion plants) while conserving endangered palm species and habitat worldwide. Please take the time to know us all better and register.

    guest Renda04.jpg

Pelagodoxa henryana vs. Joey altifrons


Okie

Recommended Posts

Just wanted to share some interesting data from my nursery. I had a 15g Pelagodoxa henryana 5' -6' tall in my shade house, right next to two Joey altifrons. The Pelagodoxa henryana died (along with 15 1gs) but my Joey palms survived. I don't understand this as I thought the Joeys would be lost as well. They survived a low of 29F and probably 10+ days of cold weather.

I'm really shocked by this.

Okie

Merritt Island, Florida

www.Islandtropicalfruit.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My "guess" Okie, with all other things being equal, was that phytophora fungi insinuated itself in the crowns of all the palms, after the cold events were concluded and provided a lethal blow to the Pelegodoxae and not the Joey altifrons. I utilised Subdue Maxx and Aliette WDG to all Zone 10b & 11 palms; kept water out of the crowns, and withheld feeding until a MONTH after a new semi-necrotic frond emerged from the crowns, and the survivability levels were about the same for the two species, or about 85% (a bit better than 4 out of five.) Your area did experience minimum temperatures about 3-5 degrees F. lower (and perhaps more total hours around or below freezing,) than did SW Broward Co. but I'm pretty certain that crown rot fungi were your responsible parcipitants (in addition to the deliterious sub freezing temperatures.)

Perhaps someone in your winter isotherm belt can offer their own survivability results.

Maybe this winter, we'll not repeat (better damned not!!) the miserable winter minimums of 2009-10. That will be paramount in keeping our marginal palms alive, if not just a bit ragged from 31-36 F. temperatures whioch are way less unusual, but relatively survivable bt our tropical plants including our tropical palms!

Happy palmin" Okie!

Pablito

Paul, The Palm Doctor @ http://www.thewisegardener.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Both of my 2G Joeys survived the long cool snap as well. They were protected on the coldest nights but held up well over the extended cool weather regardless. One of my two potted Pelagodoxa died in a drafty corner of the heated greenhouse. Neither were exposed to my lowest low (26F) but one seems to handle cool/cold weather better than the other. Other than the temperature aspect however, Pelagodoxa is a much easier palm to grow and seems to suffer nutritional deficiencies less than Joeys.

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe a good observation here is that Rick Luna in San Clemente, CA. has had a decent joey growing outside for sometime. I can't think of anyone pulling off a Pelogadoxa outside around So Cal....

Here it is almost 3 years ago. Not much bigger if at all, but still looks OK.

post-27-062308400 1287070084_thumb.jpg

Zone 10a at best after 2007 AND 2013, on SW facing hill, 1 1/2 miles from coast in Oceanside, CA. 30-98 degrees, and 45-80deg. about 95% of the time.

"The great workman of nature is time."   ,  "Genius is nothing but a great aptitude for patience."

-George-Louis Leclerc de Buffon-

I do some experiments and learning in my garden with palms so you don't have to experience the pain! Look at my old threads to find various observations and tips!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Okie, I still have the J. altifrons that I got from you a couple of years ago; it made it through the winter but has been declining ever since. I have two small P.henryanas that somehow made it without any protection. Both species are under a pretty dense canopy. One thing I noticed...the palms closest to my pool were burned the worst. I would have thought the warmer pool water (well, warmer than the air) would have radiated some heat protection. I'm guessing that the moisture generated from the contrasting temps of the air & pool in combination with the freezing temps created a bad scene for the poolside palms....freeze then fungi. I know you are surrounded by water....maybe the same thing might have happened there?

John A.

Satellite Beach, Florida

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Thank you for the input on Pelagodoxa. I have been wondering for a long time if anyone in Southern California has been able to grow one. The only one I remember seeing was in far north Queensland at a garden we visited after the New Caledonia Biennial.

I hope someone will speak up if they do have one.

Palm Student

Suzanne Rowlands

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Both of my 2G Joeys survived the long cool snap as well. They were protected on the coldest nights but held up well over the extended cool weather regardless. One of my two potted Pelagodoxa died in a drafty corner of the heated greenhouse. Neither were exposed to my lowest low (26F) but one seems to handle cool/cold weather better than the other. Other than the temperature aspect however, Pelagodoxa is a much easier palm to grow and seems to suffer nutritional deficiencies less than Joeys.

I read somewhere that joey palms are very sensitive to salt/salts--this could happen with too much fertilizer. For some reason they cannot handle salt whatsoever. the smallest amount will burn the roots, leaving the palm unable to uptake nutrients--a death sentence...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

I had a small juvenile Joeys survive 35 degrees F in the ground, in a sheltered area of my yard, in Sarasota last winter. One of them immediately lost a spear (it wilted away) after a cold rain in the 30s one day. They didn't see any frost though, and both survived and looked pretty good (other than the spear, which was eventually replaced). I had one small juvenile Pelagodoxa survive and 1 die. Interestingly, My tiny juvenile Phoenicophorium borsigianum did fine in the middle of the yard in a 1 gallon pot. It was totally unprotected and got down to around 33 degrees in it's location.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...