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St Pete Beach


ruskinPalms

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Dear Ruskin Palms  :)

All the stills are fentastic & even i enjoyed the

still that had palms borne with clusters of seeds.

And the U.S Flag flying with Coco Nuciferas in the

background is perfect for postcard usage.

Thanks for those hi res stills

Love,

Kris.

love conquers all..

43278.gif

.

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Nice photos.  Those Adonidias will eventually languish in that sugar white, nutrient free sand.

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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(Ray, Tampa @ Dec. 12 2006,07:26)

QUOTE
Nice photos.  Those Adonidias will eventually languish in that sugar white, nutrient free sand.

I was thinking the same.

Jupiter FL

in the Zone formally known as 10A

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(redant @ Dec. 12 2006,11:00)

QUOTE

(Ray @ Tampa,Dec. 12 2006,07:26)

QUOTE
Nice photos.  Those Adonidias will eventually languish in that sugar white, nutrient free sand.

I was thinking the same.

Cheap instant atmosphere for the tourists.

Larry 

Palm Harbor, FL 10a / Ft Myers, FL 10b

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Well, they had little irrigation hoses to the adonidias so at least they get fresh water... Anyway, they do a lot of weddings out there on the beach and they had actually made two "chapels" out of adonidias. I liked it being a palm freak and all, but I know those Adonidias did not like being out there exposed to the seabreeze and in the sterile sand even if they get regular water and maybe even fertilizer. You could see where some had been cut from the little groups after they died. I think they all must have been triples originally, but they aren't now.  The other Adonidia pics were taken from in front of the hotel on the street. They seemed much happier as evidenced by their profuse fruiting. What would make a good beach palm besides sabals and cocos?

Parrish, FL

Zone 9B

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Bill,

I'd try Thrinax, Coccothrinax, Pseudophoenix, Allagoptera and  Acoelorraphe for starters.  These are all typically slow growing but with the exception of Pseudophoenix, have faster growing species within the genus.

Ray

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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Bill,

Thanks for the great pictures, and thanks for letting me "borrow" one!

                            Best regards, Mike

Zone 5? East Lansing MI

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I like it. Especially the one with old glory in it. :D

Jeff

Searle Brothers Nursery Inc.

and The Rainforest Collection.

Southwest Ranches,Fl.

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