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Where is the most equable climate?


displaced_floridian

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I was looking at San Juan, Puerto Rico, where the absolute maximum is 98F and the absolute

minimum is 60F. Where in the world is there a more equable climate than this?

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For People or Plants? Theres a difference, most people tend to like less humidity than plants do.

Zone 10a at best after 2007 AND 2013, on SW facing hill, 1 1/2 miles from coast in Oceanside, CA. 30-98 degrees, and 45-80deg. about 95% of the time.

"The great workman of nature is time."   ,  "Genius is nothing but a great aptitude for patience."

-George-Louis Leclerc de Buffon-

I do some experiments and learning in my garden with palms so you don't have to experience the pain! Look at my old threads to find various observations and tips!

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Lord Howe Island is the most mild place i can think of

Old Beach ,Hobart
Tasmania ,Australia. 42 " south
Cool Maritime climate

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Hawaii or New Caledonia. In Oz, I reckon it's Mackay, but you can't grow avenues of Lipsticks there because it can get too cold, so then I think maybe Cairns. But if you can live without Lipsticks Mackay.

Best regards

Tyrone

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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What are you talking about, Tyrone....?? It is beautiful weather up here in Darwin at the moment... :winkie:

Regards, Ari :)

Ari & Scott

Darwin, NT, Australia

-12°32'53" 131°10'20"

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Of all the places I've visited or lived, I have to go with Costa Rica.

Palmmermaid

Kitty Philips

West Palm Beach, FL

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For People or Plants? Theres a difference, most people tend to like less humidity than plants do.

For plants: Singapore

For people: a mountain in Hawaii

-Jonathan

Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

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Of all the places I've visited or lived, I have to go with Costa Rica.

Me too... :)

Formerly Jeff in Costa Rica
 

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For People or Plants? Theres a difference, most people tend to like less humidity than plants do.

For plants: Singapore

For people: a mountain in Hawaii

-Jonathan

When I asked this, I was just thinking of the lack of extremes--not too hot, not too cold,

for humans. Ideally (for me) it would be like San Juan, only about 10 degrees cooler.

displaced_floridian

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Mountain in Bali would do me.... tropical still grows and it doesn't get hot!! Or Mountain in Java...

Regards, Ari :)

Ari & Scott

Darwin, NT, Australia

-12°32'53" 131°10'20"

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Mountain in Bali would do me.... tropical still grows and it doesn't get hot!! Or Mountain in Java...

Regards, Ari :)

Ari understands.

You can't just say Hawaii, Costa Rica, or New Caledonia - because any tropical location, especially islands, will have so many local weather variations to make such a statement meaningless.

For example - in Hawaii you can get stifling hot and dry in summer, cold and wet or dry in winter, or mild and comfortable year round. You can get constant wind, or an area that is constantly damp, wet, and mildewy. I think the Big Island alone has 11 climate zones (there are as many different climate zones here as exist along the entire coast stretching from Alaska to Costa Rica), so you would almost have to say what street address in Hawaii you think is the most desirable. :)

And I'm sure New Caledonia, as an island with mountains, has a wet/dry side, and hot/cold elevations, windy/calm locations, and everything in between. Same with Costa Rica - mountains or coast, and which coast. The differences in short distances in all those locations can be dramatic.

animated-volcano-image-0010.gif.71ccc48bfc1ec622a0adca187eabaaa4.gif

Kona, on The Big Island
Hawaii - Land of Volcanoes

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I always found Monte Carlo quite comfortable, speaking personally.

Peachy

I came. I saw. I purchased

 

 

27.35 south.

Warm subtropical, with occasional frosts.

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San Diego. Hands down.

Coastal San Diego, California

Z10b

Dry summer subtropical/Mediterranean

warm summer/mild winter

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San Diego would be my first choice in the U.S. from April to November. Dec. thru March is a little too cool for me. If I could, I'd spend Winters in FL and summers in coastal SoCal. What I'm really looking for (just dreaming, of course) is a place that is like San Diego in summer and Key West in Winter.

post-4141-12732880637247_thumb.jpg

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B)

dats right,we bad!

the "prince of snarkness."

 

still "warning-free."

 

san diego,california,left coast.

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i meant to do that.

the "prince of snarkness."

 

still "warning-free."

 

san diego,california,left coast.

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John- I kept wanting to say San Diego, I just couldn't bring myself to do it. Thanks!

Zone 10a at best after 2007 AND 2013, on SW facing hill, 1 1/2 miles from coast in Oceanside, CA. 30-98 degrees, and 45-80deg. about 95% of the time.

"The great workman of nature is time."   ,  "Genius is nothing but a great aptitude for patience."

-George-Louis Leclerc de Buffon-

I do some experiments and learning in my garden with palms so you don't have to experience the pain! Look at my old threads to find various observations and tips!

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Since I do not mind heat, and I have had enough cold in my life I am quite happy with my climate here on the equator in the middle of the forest. Similar subjects have come up before. Our seasonal temperature variation is miminal and it is always hot. But, climate is only one factor in where a person choses to live. There are many places on the planet with great climates that are terrible places to live. Well, depending on what a person likes or not I guess.

dk

Don Kittelson

 

LIFE ON THE RIO NEGRO

03° 06' 07'' South 60° 01' 30'' West

Altitude 92 Meters / 308 feet above sea level

1,500 kms / 932 miles to the mouth of the Amazon River

 

Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil - A Cidade da Floresta

Where the world´s largest Tropical Rainforest embraces the Greatest Rivers in the World. .

82331.gif

 

Click here to visit Amazonas

amazonas2.jpg

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San Diego would be my first choice in the U.S. from April to November. Dec. thru March is a little too cool for me. If I could, I'd spend Winters in FL and summers in coastal SoCal. What I'm really looking for (just dreaming, of course) is a place that is like San Diego in summer and Key West in Winter.

Well, then. Maybe the Canary Islands or parts of S. Africa like Dhurban.

Coastal San Diego, California

Z10b

Dry summer subtropical/Mediterranean

warm summer/mild winter

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Leilani Estates...

-Jonathan

Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

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yea-

its san diego

the weather is as close to perfect as any place on earth

I think in you're right--at least in the U.S. San Diego would be the 'most comfortable' based on degree days. SD has only 1335 heating degree days and 1014 cooling degree days in an average year. By contrast, Key West has only around 100 heating degree days, but over 4700 cooling degree days in a year, so A/C is needed most of the year. Energy experts use degree days as a way to determine heating and cooling needs for buildings, and energy expenses. The fewer degree days, the less heating/air conditioning is needed. (Degree days are based on the assumption that on a day when the average temp is 65 deg. F, no heating or cooling is needed. So, if a day's high was 67 and low was 49, the average for the day is 58, which is 7 deg. less than 65, so there is 7 Heating degree days for that day. Cooling degree days accumulate for days when average is >65*F.) I could not find a city in the U.S. with fewer degree days (heating+cooling) than San Diego.

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Three places in OZ come to mind, Pottsville in New South Wales and somewhere between Kuranda and Atherton in North Queensland (Cool Tropics) and Kalbarri in Western Australia.

Edited by Greenleaf

Happy Gardening

Cheers,

Wal

Queensland, Australia.

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Fiji.

Close to the southern or eastern coast of either larger island in a location with protection from the tradewinds.

Here there is very little temperature variation and a dry season that is never as dry as other areas.

Jim

Located on Vanua Levu near Savusavu (16degrees South) Elevation from sealevel to 30meters with average annual rainfall of 2800mm (110in) with temperature from 18 to 34C (65 to 92F).

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It's very subjective. If you were a gardener who liked flying kites then the windward side of a tropical island might seem the most equable climate. However if your hobby was blowing smoke rings then you might think the leeward side is better.

The people who set 67F (18.3C) as a median temperature dividing where heating or cooling would be required come from a cold climate, of course they'd set the figure low. If it was set by people from a warm climate it'd be a lot higher. It depends on what personally suits an individual. Providing the extremes were close together, you could get used to many different median temperatures.

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Three places in OZ come to mind, Pottsville in New South Wales and somewhere between Kuranda and Atherton in North Queensland (Cool Tropics) and Kalbarri in Western Australia.

I didn't think of Kalbarri. If it wasn't miles from anywhere, and you were retired it wouldn't be so bad actually. No summer rainfall though and it gets incredibly hot in summer. It averages about 34C for all of summer, and nights similar to the Gold Coast. Winter rains barely reach it, so it has dry winters almost the same as Brisbane and the Gold Coast. You could grow a nice palm garden up there and the water's good too. It probably gets 330 days of sunshine a year. The Murchison river would be a nice thing to explore if you lived there. Basically a wilderness area. Sleepy quiet place until the tourists come.

Best regards

Tyrone

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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yea-

its san diego

the weather is as close to perfect as any place on earth

I think in you're right--at least in the U.S. San Diego would be the 'most comfortable' based on degree days. SD has only 1335 heating degree days and 1014 cooling degree days in an average year. By contrast, Key West has only around 100 heating degree days, but over 4700 cooling degree days in a year, so A/C is needed most of the year. Energy experts use degree days as a way to determine heating and cooling needs for buildings, and energy expenses. The fewer degree days, the less heating/air conditioning is needed. (Degree days are based on the assumption that on a day when the average temp is 65 deg. F, no heating or cooling is needed. So, if a day's high was 67 and low was 49, the average for the day is 58, which is 7 deg. less than 65, so there is 7 Heating degree days for that day. Cooling degree days accumulate for days when average is >65*F.) I could not find a city in the U.S. with fewer degree days (heating+cooling) than San Diego.

This is of course a completely subjective topic if you're meaning human comfort rather than actual short-thermometer swings, which would occur right on the equator. I grew up in San Diego and personally hate the constantly cold weather there. 50s and 60s is not comfortable to me, particularly with a stiff breeze off the cold Pacific. My decades spent in Los Angeles were a bit better away from the coast in the air-drained region from Westwood to Hollywood, but the endless cold, grey springs and year-round chilly evenings still prevail there. I am right now sitting in Key West and can say first-hand that air conditioning is not required here most of the year in well-designed buildings. Cooling-degree readings do not take into account tradewinds, nor architecture optimized for human habitation in comfortable climates. This climate affords the ability to live an open-air existence. Ceiling fans make the difference during still periods in all but the worst heat here. Under the shade of a coconut grove, and with the intermittent cooling rain-showers, nobody can be unhappy. No A/C required for this boy!

Edited by mnorell

Michael Norell

Rancho Mirage, California | 33°44' N 116°25' W | 287 ft | z10a | avg Jan 43/70F | Jul 78/108F avg | Weather Station KCARANCH310

previously Big Pine Key, Florida | 24°40' N 81°21' W | 4.5 ft. | z12a | Calcareous substrate | avg annual min. approx 52F | avg Jan 65/75F | Jul 83/90 | extreme min approx 41F

previously Natchez, Mississippi | 31°33' N 91°24' W | 220 ft.| z9a | Downtown/river-adjacent | Loess substrate | avg annual min. 23F | Jan 43/61F | Jul 73/93F | extreme min 2.5F (1899); previously Los Angeles, California (multiple locations)

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yea-

its san diego

the weather is as close to perfect as any place on earth

I think in you're right--at least in the U.S. San Diego would be the 'most comfortable' based on degree days. SD has only 1335 heating degree days and 1014 cooling degree days in an average year. By contrast, Key West has only around 100 heating degree days, but over 4700 cooling degree days in a year, so A/C is needed most of the year. Energy experts use degree days as a way to determine heating and cooling needs for buildings, and energy expenses. The fewer degree days, the less heating/air conditioning is needed. (Degree days are based on the assumption that on a day when the average temp is 65 deg. F, no heating or cooling is needed. So, if a day's high was 67 and low was 49, the average for the day is 58, which is 7 deg. less than 65, so there is 7 Heating degree days for that day. Cooling degree days accumulate for days when average is >65*F.) I could not find a city in the U.S. with fewer degree days (heating+cooling) than San Diego.

This is of course a completely subjective topic if you're meaning human comfort rather than actual short-thermometer swings, which would occur right on the equator. I grew up in San Diego and personally hate the constantly cold weather there. 50s and 60s is not comfortable to me, particularly with a stiff breeze off the cold Pacific. My decades spent in Los Angeles were a bit better away from the coast in the air-drained region from Westwood to Hollywood, but the endless cold, grey springs and year-round chilly evenings still prevail there. I am right now sitting in Key West and can say first-hand that air conditioning is not required here most of the year in well-designed buildings. Cooling-degree readings do not take into account tradewinds, nor architecture optimized for human habitation in comfortable climates. This climate affords the ability to live an open-air existence. Ceiling fans make the difference during still periods in all but the worst heat here. Under the shade of a coconut grove, and with the intermittent cooling rain-showers, nobody can be unhappy. No A/C required for this boy!

Mnorell,

When I started this thread I meant by 'equable' a place with the least wide temperature swings.I cited San Juan, PR, with a spread of only 38*F (about 21*C). Then it got off into the 'most comfortable' climate. Of course human comfort is quite subjective. I think, as you said, a place near the equator with a strong maritime influence would be the most 'equable' in an absolute sense. That's what I was looking for--a specific place with less of a temp variation than San Juan.

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Yes, it would most likely be an island at 0 degrees latitude, far from land in the highest-humidity environment and without any unusual ocean currents to import temperature-swings to the area. Probably the Gilbert Islands or Line Islands (Kiritimati) would be about as good as it gets. Tarawa in the Gilberts has a mean temp vacillating from 28-29C throughout the year. Their average lows are either 26 or 27C and average highs 30 or 31C in all months. For Cocos Island Airport (Christmas Islands/Kiritimati), weather.com shows averages of an 8F swing day to night throughout the year, 74-77F (23-25C) average daily min, 82-85F (28-29C) average daily max.

Michael Norell

Rancho Mirage, California | 33°44' N 116°25' W | 287 ft | z10a | avg Jan 43/70F | Jul 78/108F avg | Weather Station KCARANCH310

previously Big Pine Key, Florida | 24°40' N 81°21' W | 4.5 ft. | z12a | Calcareous substrate | avg annual min. approx 52F | avg Jan 65/75F | Jul 83/90 | extreme min approx 41F

previously Natchez, Mississippi | 31°33' N 91°24' W | 220 ft.| z9a | Downtown/river-adjacent | Loess substrate | avg annual min. 23F | Jan 43/61F | Jul 73/93F | extreme min 2.5F (1899); previously Los Angeles, California (multiple locations)

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Yes, it would most likely be an island at 0 degrees latitude, far from land in the highest-humidity environment and without any unusual ocean currents to import temperature-swings to the area. Probably the Gilbert Islands or Line Islands (Kiritimati) would be about as good as it gets. Tarawa in the Gilberts has a mean temp vacillating from 28-29C throughout the year. Their average lows are either 26 or 27C and average highs 30 or 31C in all months. For Cocos Island Airport (Christmas Islands/Kiritimati), weather.com shows averages of an 8F swing day to night throughout the year, 74-77F (23-25C) average daily min, 82-85F (28-29C) average daily max.

I can't see how Tarawa or the Gilbert Islands or any of Kiribati could be good for palm growing as they are dry and fairly poor soils with problems of sealevel rising and a lack of self-oroduced foods and the ability to grow is low.

Located on Vanua Levu near Savusavu (16degrees South) Elevation from sealevel to 30meters with average annual rainfall of 2800mm (110in) with temperature from 18 to 34C (65 to 92F).

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Kula on Maui, or Waimea (Kamuela) on the Big Island.

Resident of Puerto de la Cruz, Tenerife, San Diego, CA and Pahoa, HI.  Former garden in Vista, CA.  Garden Photos

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I was looking at San Juan, Puerto Rico, where the absolute maximum is 98F and the absolute

minimum is 60F. Where in the world is there a more equable climate than this?

If you are an American and you want to stay in America w/all its political aspects then the only choice is somewhere in Hawai`i. But can you afford to buy in and then live here. It ain't cheap that's for sure.

I was lucky came here 40+ years ago and lucked out on some land that the guy had to cell as his new wife didn't want to live in the old wife's house since the new wife's house was bigger and better.

Besides remaining "American" all the reasons for living on the West Side of O`ahu are on the list posted below this.

Oh yea, there is nothing to kill you if you wander thru the woods like snakes, spiders, lions, bears, Tasmanian devils (the last was a joke)

Wai`anae Steve-------www.waianaecrider.com
Living in Paradise, Leeward O`ahu, Hawai`i, USA
Temperature range yearly from say 95 to 62 degrees F
Only 3 hurricanes in the past 51 years and no damage. No floods where I am, No tornados, No earthquakes
No moles, squirrels, chipmunks, deer, etc. Just the neighbors "wild" chickens

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I would say that altitude, latitude, and precipitation make more of a difference than being in the middle of the ocean. Well, maybe being in the middle of the largest tropical rainforest in the world on the equator at a low elevation is similar to being in the middle of the ocean at a similar latitude. I attached a climate graph for Manaus below. Our climate is pretty similar to that of Singapore except that there is a more pronounced dry season here. But, the temperature swing is pretty much the same. Here most days are between 24 C and 34 C with a few days above and a few days below the average. Today is rather cool for example 28 C in the middle of the afternoon. It has been overcast and rainy all day. If the sun were out it would be from 32 to 35 C.

As to where one feels comfortable to live on the Earth is totally separate subject. As an American not living in the States I feel perfectly at home where I am. It would be nice sometimes to go for a walk in the woods without having to think about where you step as a bushmaster or the like maybe under the leaves. Or that a jaguar might include you in it´s food chain. But then again that keeps life interesting.

dk

post-188-12739508752223_thumb.jpg

Don Kittelson

 

LIFE ON THE RIO NEGRO

03° 06' 07'' South 60° 01' 30'' West

Altitude 92 Meters / 308 feet above sea level

1,500 kms / 932 miles to the mouth of the Amazon River

 

Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil - A Cidade da Floresta

Where the world´s largest Tropical Rainforest embraces the Greatest Rivers in the World. .

82331.gif

 

Click here to visit Amazonas

amazonas2.jpg

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I would say that altitude, latitude, and precipitation make more of a difference than being in the middle of the ocean. Well, maybe being in the middle of the largest tropical rainforest in the world on the equator at a low elevation is similar to being in the middle of the ocean at a similar latitude. I attached a climate graph for Manaus below. Our climate is pretty similar to that of Singapore except that there is a more pronounced dry season here. But, the temperature swing is pretty much the same. Here most days are between 24 C and 34 C with a few days above and a few days below the average. Today is rather cool for example 28 C in the middle of the afternoon. It has been overcast and rainy all day. If the sun were out it would be from 32 to 35 C.

As to where one feels comfortable to live on the Earth is totally separate subject. As an American not living in the States I feel perfectly at home where I am. It would be nice sometimes to go for a walk in the woods without having to think about where you step as a bushmaster or the like maybe under the leaves. Or that a jaguar might include you in it´s food chain. But then again that keeps life interesting.

dk

Interesting data Don. Not sure I understand the Centigrade numbers w/o a conversion chart.

Which I have right here --> http://www.teaching-english-in-japan.net/conversion/celsius/

So your temps are very much like sea level Hawai`i.

Did you move for the love of Brazil or your lovely lady?

Years ago before marrage I let my girl friend know that if she agreed to marry me she'd also agree to live in Hawai`i at least as long as I live if she wants me. Guess she did cause we are still here together. I met my wife after first falling in love w/the islands.

Wai`anae Steve-------www.waianaecrider.com
Living in Paradise, Leeward O`ahu, Hawai`i, USA
Temperature range yearly from say 95 to 62 degrees F
Only 3 hurricanes in the past 51 years and no damage. No floods where I am, No tornados, No earthquakes
No moles, squirrels, chipmunks, deer, etc. Just the neighbors "wild" chickens

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Steve,

Falling in love with Brazil came first. And, there have been several lovely ladies since. The temperature range is pretty much a low of 72 F and a high of around 95 F on the average. But, the highs can get up to 104 F from time to time. But, the lows very very rarely make it below 70 F.

dk

Don Kittelson

 

LIFE ON THE RIO NEGRO

03° 06' 07'' South 60° 01' 30'' West

Altitude 92 Meters / 308 feet above sea level

1,500 kms / 932 miles to the mouth of the Amazon River

 

Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil - A Cidade da Floresta

Where the world´s largest Tropical Rainforest embraces the Greatest Rivers in the World. .

82331.gif

 

Click here to visit Amazonas

amazonas2.jpg

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Steve,

Falling in love with Brazil came first. And, there have been several lovely ladies since. The temperature range is pretty much a low of 72 F and a high of around 95 F on the average. But, the highs can get up to 104 F from time to time. But, the lows very very rarely make it below 70 F.

dk

We rarely get over 100 here. But it does get below 70 each winter. I've seen it down to about 60, but that was at 2800' elevation. Here at 300' it might hit 65 very early on a clear winter morning before the sun comes up.

Wai`anae Steve-------www.waianaecrider.com
Living in Paradise, Leeward O`ahu, Hawai`i, USA
Temperature range yearly from say 95 to 62 degrees F
Only 3 hurricanes in the past 51 years and no damage. No floods where I am, No tornados, No earthquakes
No moles, squirrels, chipmunks, deer, etc. Just the neighbors "wild" chickens

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So it appears that technically, Cocos Island takes the cake for the climate with the least diurnal variation on an annual basis. Just for the sake of a variety in temp. preference, my ideal temp. is 68 F, which is the temp. I keep my house at year-round. I detest hot and humid weather, but enjoy its affect on my palms and other tropicals. In terms of the perfect climate for my comfort, San Diego temperatures with 60-80 inches of rain a year would be about my speed.

-Michael

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Yes, it would most likely be an island at 0 degrees latitude, far from land in the highest-humidity environment and without any unusual ocean currents to import temperature-swings to the area. Probably the Gilbert Islands or Line Islands (Kiritimati) would be about as good as it gets. Tarawa in the Gilberts has a mean temp vacillating from 28-29C throughout the year. Their average lows are either 26 or 27C and average highs 30 or 31C in all months. For Cocos Island Airport (Christmas Islands/Kiritimati), weather.com shows averages of an 8F swing day to night throughout the year, 74-77F (23-25C) average daily min, 82-85F (28-29C) average daily max.

do these islands groups get hit by Typhoons ?

Wai`anae Steve-------www.waianaecrider.com
Living in Paradise, Leeward O`ahu, Hawai`i, USA
Temperature range yearly from say 95 to 62 degrees F
Only 3 hurricanes in the past 51 years and no damage. No floods where I am, No tornados, No earthquakes
No moles, squirrels, chipmunks, deer, etc. Just the neighbors "wild" chickens

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