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Colombia II


Trópico

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Turbaco, a small village about an hour inland from Cartagena. This was the highlight of my trip along Coastal Colombia.

Several Roystoneas, and one of my fav, Sabal morrisiana, used for roof thatching.

bogsantamartaColombia059.jpg

ID's are welcome to n00b eyes!

bogsantamartaColombia060.jpg

Frank

 

Zone 9b pine flatlands

humid/hot summers; dry/cool winters

with yearly freezes

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I don't understand the point to this type of garden in the tropics. It's like having a botanical garden here with Maples, Oaks and Sycamores.

Los Niños y Los Borrachos siempre dicen la verdad.

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i've never thought of it that way.kinda like having an aquarium when you live on the coast.

i imagine it's for the sake of convenience...

the "prince of snarkness."

 

still "warning-free."

 

san diego,california,left coast.

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A better view of the palms in first pic

bogsantamartaColombia061.jpg

Bactris gasipaes?

bogsantamartaColombia062.jpg

Frank

 

Zone 9b pine flatlands

humid/hot summers; dry/cool winters

with yearly freezes

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Hmmm. Frank- I looked up Sabal morrisiana in the Kew Monocot list, as I was not familiar with that name and it is listed as a synonym of mauritiiformis. The Sabal pictured does not look like any mauritiiformis I have seen, so I am very confused.  Thanks for the pics. More please.

Zac

Edit- On looking at the second pic, it looks more like mauritiiformis now.

Zac  

Living to get back to Mexico

International Palm Society member since 2007

http://community.webshots.com/user/zacspics - My Webshots Gallery

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(alex_7b @ Sep. 05 2006,13:42)

QUOTE
I don't understand the point to this type of garden in the tropics. It's like having a botanical garden here with Maples, Oaks and Sycamores.

My wife was a little hesitant to go to this botanical gardens and said that she was going to take me to the one in Bogota, where it's even bigger and has even more species, including from tropical climates and desert places. I insisted in going to this one, even if we had to depart from the "safety" of the hotel sponsored tours. This is the right place to have this type of gardens and I suppose you all know the reason! She and I are not regretting it.

Zac, look under Bay leaf palm. I am not too familiar with the other Sabal species, other than Sabal palmetto, minor, and etonia, and still have trouble identifying them. Maybe this one is not what I think it is but the guide told me this one is used in making weaved roofs (like the ones in the previous Colombia thread). I wrote down the name he told me in spanish but I since lost it...

More:

Pritchardia???... please help here!

bogsantamartaColombia063.jpg

bogsantamartaColombia065.jpg

Frank

 

Zone 9b pine flatlands

humid/hot summers; dry/cool winters

with yearly freezes

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Your picture of the two large spiny trunks are not Bactris gasipaes, but some type of a Astocaryum species.

 And the picture with the beautifil large palm with palmate leaves looks like a Pritchardia pacifica, with maybe tall Adonidias off to the side.

   How large was this garden? Any more pictures?Thanks.

Searle Brothers Nursery Inc.

and The Rainforest Collection.

Southwest Ranches,Fl.

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Where else than in the tropics would it be possible to have a botanical garden with tropical plants!!?? Anyone who has seen (for instance) Singapore Botanic Garden and Nong Nooch in Thailand would most certainly agree that the tropics is THE place for a botanical garden.

And the Sabal morrisiana above (an old name) is indeed S. mauritiiformis.

Very nice photos, Trópico! Looks like a great place.

Leilani Estates, 25 mls/40 km south of Hilo, Big Island of Hawai'i. Elevation 880 ft/270 m. Average rainfall 140 inches/3550 mm

 

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where else without having to go to extreme measures--

like at the kew...

the "prince of snarkness."

 

still "warning-free."

 

san diego,california,left coast.

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Kew is VERY impressive, but a true tropical botanical garden should be OUTDOORS!! :)

Leilani Estates, 25 mls/40 km south of Hilo, Big Island of Hawai'i. Elevation 880 ft/270 m. Average rainfall 140 inches/3550 mm

 

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BGs there, besides the eye candy they provide, are used there to experiment and introduce new species into the urban landscape and into local agriculture. Also, there was a section being used for a film.

bogsantamartaColombia065.jpg

bogsantamartaColombia066.jpg

Frank

 

Zone 9b pine flatlands

humid/hot summers; dry/cool winters

with yearly freezes

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The panama hat "palm", Carludovica palmata

bogsantamartaColombia067.jpg

Heliconia

bogsantamartaColombia068.jpg

Frank

 

Zone 9b pine flatlands

humid/hot summers; dry/cool winters

with yearly freezes

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Fresh and drinking water coming from underground sources flowed in small streams all across the gardens

DSC00993.jpg

DSC00994.jpg

Frank

 

Zone 9b pine flatlands

humid/hot summers; dry/cool winters

with yearly freezes

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  • 2 months later...

More pics from Jardín Botánico Guillermo Piñeres

bogsantamartaColombia087.jpg

ID?

bogsantamartaColombia088.jpg

Frank

 

Zone 9b pine flatlands

humid/hot summers; dry/cool winters

with yearly freezes

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Dear Tropico  :)

after seeing your photos i want to leave my bussiness and

leave to colombia in next avaliable flight,not to return

back home.but to work as the chief gardener for that

garden seen in your stills.

All i will need is a easy chair to sit down and relax after

doing daily garden work_lovely place to be on earth..

thanks,

Kris.

love conquers all..

43278.gif

.

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Frank, thank you for all the great pictures of a beautiful garden! Very mature palms and cycads!!

Dave Hughson

Carlsbad, Ca

1 mile from ocean

Zone 10b

Palm freaks are good peeps!!!!!

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  • 1 month later...

Licuala grandis

DSC01047.jpg

Seeds. Our guide was eager to sneak some to me so I had to tip him generously.

DSC01048.jpg

Frank

 

Zone 9b pine flatlands

humid/hot summers; dry/cool winters

with yearly freezes

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Pritchardia?

DSC01050.jpg

Not grass, but a Roystonea ground cover

DSC01052.jpg

Frank

 

Zone 9b pine flatlands

humid/hot summers; dry/cool winters

with yearly freezes

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(Trópico @ Dec. 13 2006,11:58)

QUOTE
World famous Noni

DSC01015.jpg

Hey Frank, is this a native fruit? It's not famous here though...

Very nice place, thanx for sharing the photos.

Sirinhaém beach, 80 Km south of Recife - Brazil

Tropical oceanic climate, latitude 8° S

Temperature extremes: 25 to 31°C

2000 mm average rainfall, dry summers

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Beautiful photographs!

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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Gileno,

Noni (Morinda citrifolia) is native to Southeast Asia. It made it's way into the US as health drinks being sold at Vitamin or Natural food marketplaces, as well as radio ad "cure for everything from the exotic pacific islands". I don't know how well known by the anglo community but the hispanic community here knows about it. The juice tastes "interesting", I would describe it as "earthly medicine". They don't offer the fruit here. Our guide sneaked some two fruits for us. We tried to consume without having any idea how to prepare them. As we were peeling them they smelled unbearably rotten.

Frank

 

Zone 9b pine flatlands

humid/hot summers; dry/cool winters

with yearly freezes

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Lovely photos..aaaah, the wonder of the tropics!

Daryl

Gold Coast, Queensland Latitude 28S. Mild, Humid Subtropical climate. Rainfall - not consistent enough!

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