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Landscape Palms of Bandung, Indonesia


iwan

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The next stop was Bandung, in western Java for my sister-in-laws wedding.  Needless to say, not a lot of time for palm hunting in the two days I was there.  Again, very few attempts at identification will be made.  Identifications welcome!

Hotel Gucci.  Gucci is one Indonesian word for pot, and they lived up to the name with potted palms everywhere.  This was a modest hotel.

Nice branching palm (dypsis?)

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Probably the healthiest Dypsis decaryi I saw my entire trip (not at the hotel).

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All the decaryi's I saw had this black mold

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Robert

Madera, CA (central San Joaquin valley)

9A

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Another branching (dypsis?)

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Beautiful white trunk (different palm from the one above)

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A whole row of them

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Robert

Madera, CA (central San Joaquin valley)

9A

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On the way back to Jakarta, we headed up to the mountains to look at houses, plant nurseries, and have lunch.

Cycads at a very upscale housing development (more expensive than most US houses).

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Some plumeria and some of the new houses in the background

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Dypsis lutescens (?) at the project office.  They had quite a stock of palm specimens ready to deploy around the development also.

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Robert

Madera, CA (central San Joaquin valley)

9A

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We had lunch further up in the mountains.  This style of dining is called "lesehan".  Basicly, it means eating while sitting (usually on the ground/floor) outdoors.  Kind of like a picnic, but it is a restaurant.

Phoenix

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Odd trunk base and arial roots for the Phoenix above

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Some of the dining huts

photo43.jpg

Robert

Madera, CA (central San Joaquin valley)

9A

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Nothing says tropics like dining surrounded by rice paddies and Cocos nucifera!  The pine tree kind of ruins the feeling though.  This was probably around 700m ASL and they even farmed strawberries there.  This is a famous nursery area because of the moderate tropical climate.

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That wraps up Bandung and environs.  Next stop Yogyakarta (central Java).

Robert

Madera, CA (central San Joaquin valley)

9A

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great photos again! i love the palem merah!

the "prince of snarkness."

 

still "warning-free."

 

san diego,california,left coast.

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iwan we should start importing those bales!they are so cool!

the "prince of snarkness."

 

still "warning-free."

 

san diego,california,left coast.

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Dear Iwan  :)

all your pictures are fantastic and those

that made me spellbound are post no.6

last picture & post no.7 still.

those are the best places to go & relax !

thanks for sharing those lovely pictures.

love,

Kris(India).

love conquers all..

43278.gif

.

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(pohonkelapa @ Oct. 19 2006,00:55)

QUOTE
iwan we should start importing those bales!they are so cool!

PK, I looked into importing some once.  The biggest problem with them is they crack, warp etc. coming into our low humidity climates.  I have an importer friend in the SF area (reasonably humid) that brought in an 1880's teak Javanese pendopo (bale), gazebo in english and spent weeks trying to get all the mortise and tennon joints to fit back together again.  

Even if you could get the builder to kiln dry the wood before manufacture, I suspect that after construction time, remember usually hand crafted (no power tools) and a couple months in a cargo container, their will have sucked up a substantial amount of moisture again.

Robert

Madera, CA (central San Joaquin valley)

9A

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Great pics, what a wonderful location.  Can't wait for the pictures from your next stop.

That whole area is abundant with very talented cabinet makers and joiners.  They make some of the best hand-crafted furniture in the world and have the ideal timbers from which to produce it, right on their doorstep.  Some of their antique reproduction, particularly carving detail, is extremely impressive and the prices are ridiculously low.

]

Corey Lucas-Divers

Dorset, UK

Ave Jul High 72F/22C (91F/33C Max)

Ave Jul Low 52F/11C (45F/7C Min)

Ave Jan High 46F/8C (59F/15C Max)

Ave Jan Low 34F/1C (21F/-6C Min)

Ave Rain 736mm pa

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Thanks for posting pictures from what will be a memorable trip always.  I must get over there soon!

Searle Brothers Nursery Inc.

and The Rainforest Collection.

Southwest Ranches,Fl.

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Very nice photos!

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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I always enjoy seeing pics with palms from tropical countries around the world.  Great photos.  Makes me want to travel again even tho' I just got back from the Dominican Republic, which by the way was a great experience and fun time - attended the IPS Biennial.

Hawaii Island (Big Island), leeward coast, 19 degrees N. latitude, south Kona mauka at approx. 380m (1,250 ft.) and about 1.6 km (1-mile) upslope from ocean.

 

No record of a hurricane passing over this island (yet!).  

Summer maximum rainfall - variable averaging 900-1150mm (35-45") - Perfect drainage on black volcanic rocky soil.  

Nice sunsets!

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Thanks for all the comments.  

Al, Costa Rica has been on my visit list for a long time.  The next biennial may just be the incentive I need to finally make the trip.

Robert

Madera, CA (central San Joaquin valley)

9A

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