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Cordyline Collection


Dypsisdean

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It's hard for me to pass by a Ti plant that I don't already have in the collection, whether it's at a nursery or in a garden I see passing by. People here on the Big Island are always happy to give you a cutting from their garden if you ask. Bring it home and stick it in the ground and you have a new Ti. There must be hundreds of different kinds in almost every color imaginable. Here are some pics of my favs.

post-11-1151737930_thumb.jpg

animated-volcano-image-0010.gif.71ccc48bfc1ec622a0adca187eabaaa4.gif

Kona, on The Big Island
Hawaii - Land of Volcanoes

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very nice dean! I have 8 different cordylines and love them all! I really need to get some of the variations you've got though. Beautiful colors!!

Dave Hughson

Carlsbad, Ca

1 mile from ocean

Zone 10b

Palm freaks are good peeps!!!!!

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Nice stuff !! They don't survive the winter here, but the are beautifull plants ...

Southwest

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(Dypsisdean @ Jul. 01 2006,03:12)

QUOTE
Bring it home and stick it in the ground and you have a new Ti.

And over the years...the one cutting will make dozens more!

Larry 

Palm Harbor, FL 10a / Ft Myers, FL 10b

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Very nice!

Too bad the snails shred them here.

dave

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

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Dypsisdean : I love your Cordylines! #1 is my favorite!

Here are a few of mine

post-35-1152203646_thumb.jpg

Sub-tropical

Summer rainfall 1200mm

Annual average temp 21c

30 South

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Ahhh, so nice to see some Ti plants being posted. This is another passion of mine. I actually live 2 1/2 hours south of Dr. Frank Brown. The author of the cordyline book and a personal friend.

  Your first picture is called Miss Andrea(named after my wife). The 3rd. is called Pink Diamond and the 5th. one is Wili's Gold. These are excellent varieties and considered some of the best. These plants add so much color to a tropical garden and should be used along with crotons when ever possible. Thanks for the pic.'s !

Searle Brothers Nursery Inc.

and The Rainforest Collection.

Southwest Ranches,Fl.

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Hi Jeff

Are you reffering to my pictures? If so thanks for the i.d's, and one named after your Mrs too!

Thanks again

Dennis

Sub-tropical

Summer rainfall 1200mm

Annual average temp 21c

30 South

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Hey all,

Variations aside, are all Cordylines the same species with similar requirements? I've got a couple planted in semishade here, but they've only been in the ground about 3 months. How much sun can they tolerate & still look good?

Thanks in advance,

Bret

Bret

 

Coastal canyon area of San Diego

 

"In the shadow of the Cross"

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Hi Brett

In more humid areas most do well in full sun. Avoid planting any varients with lots of white in the leaf in full sun.

Cheers

Dennis

Sub-tropical

Summer rainfall 1200mm

Annual average temp 21c

30 South

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Bret,

Not sure where you are, but in coastal San Diego I have mine in full sun. I think they apppreciate the extra warmth that gives them in winter. They don't like too much winter shade. In the tropics they grow anywhere.

animated-volcano-image-0010.gif.71ccc48bfc1ec622a0adca187eabaaa4.gif

Kona, on The Big Island
Hawaii - Land of Volcanoes

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Dennis,

    Sorry for the confusion. I was naming the varieties that Dypsisdean posted.

      Jeff

Searle Brothers Nursery Inc.

and The Rainforest Collection.

Southwest Ranches,Fl.

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I met a sweet older hawaiian lady last year (here in CA) that apparently has an unbelievable collection of ti plants in her HI garden. She has been sending me a wide variety of cuttings. Her son lives in Hawaiian Gardens, CA (Southern edge of Los Angeles county) and grows hundreds of her hybrid ti plants in his garden. That convinced me that I need to start dabbling with these colorful delights. I just started experimenting with ti plants at my nursery. I have about 25 species growing from cuttings. Each cutting has 2-7 stems growing from it. Most of the varieties pictured in this string are in this small collection. I have big hopes for the 'Vanuatu' variety and 'Pele's Smoke' but I don't know how well some of these will grow here. I have about 500 total and have not suffered any casualties to this point. They rooted easily and quickly - about 3 weeks from fresh cutting to 2" roots. They are in my cold frame and receive a generous amount of water and fungicide/insecticide/miticide to keep off all the little buggers. I noticed a strange phenomenon last month. Some of the leaves looked a little shredded in the centers. Unfortunatley, I don't have a pic and don't know how to post one anyway. I'd like to know what causes this and why it stopped spreading. all of my treatments remained the same.....

John Mendoza

Landscape Designer, Owner

Tropical Vibe Nursery and Landscape

www.tropicalvibe.com

949.340.5444

-Full Landscape design and installation

-Wide variety of palms and tropicals, centrally located in Orange County

-Complete line of garden care products available everyday

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Jeff Searle - can you tell me the title of the cordyline book?

Thanks!

John Mendoza

Landscape Designer, Owner

Tropical Vibe Nursery and Landscape

www.tropicalvibe.com

949.340.5444

-Full Landscape design and installation

-Wide variety of palms and tropicals, centrally located in Orange County

-Complete line of garden care products available everyday

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Johnny,

B. Frank Brown's book is titled "The Cordyline"

Copyright 1994 by Valkaria Gardens

Go to the end of this thread on another forum. There is apparently a very nice CD ROM available.

http://spectresjungle.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=6207

BTW---Keep snail and slug bait around them always. Any shredded leaves should be assumed to be them unless proved otherwise. They love 'em. And will ruin them in a couple of days if you don't stop 'em.

animated-volcano-image-0010.gif.71ccc48bfc1ec622a0adca187eabaaa4.gif

Kona, on The Big Island
Hawaii - Land of Volcanoes

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Dean (Konakid),

Thanks for the book info. You mentioned that your tis are growing in full sun in SD. how do you think they might fare in full sun OC? Do they look better if they have canopy for the winters?

I have them on 3' benches and haven't ever had any snails in my coldframe until the Cordies came along. The regular fungicide/insecticide/miticide treatments discouraged them from hanging around. However, the malathion treatments that I am required to use by the AG work very effectively to rid the snails.

I spoke with Phil B and he mentioned that he has had the same problems with the inner-leaf shredding. Their anr't any tracks ot rounded corners to the shredding. They are very straight lines. It looks like the shredded areas were scratched by an abbrasive. It's wierd but it ended as quickly as it started. Since then I have had 2-3 leaf flushes.

John Mendoza

Landscape Designer, Owner

Tropical Vibe Nursery and Landscape

www.tropicalvibe.com

949.340.5444

-Full Landscape design and installation

-Wide variety of palms and tropicals, centrally located in Orange County

-Complete line of garden care products available everyday

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Johnny,

Ask jeff searle he has one of the biggest collection of cordylines I`ve seen. He will be able to answer all your questions on them and what will fare in the full sun.

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One thing Ive found with cordylines after growing and propagating thousands for a landscaping nursery in my previous job.

Is that just like palms every sport  of cordyline is totally diffrent not just visually but in regards to how fast they grow,how much moisture, and sunlight they grow best in and even how hardy they are to cold, dry conditions ect.

Some thrive in full sun and get there best colour and others look terrible in full sun and lose there colour.

(see the website for more info)

Another thing thats relly suprising is most are very very easy to propagate while a few can actually be a little tricky when just taken from stem cuttings(no leaf)

But these are easily propagated from a stem cutting with leafs.

And when taken just from stem cuttings diffrent sports grow at very diffrent speeds some dont send many shoots while others send many.

Sunshine Coast

Queensland

Australia

Subtropical climate

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How cute is the first one posted by PalmsZA ! Any name?

This is probably my favourite here. It is named Wild Flame and came from Lyon Arboretum in Honolulu, it is a strong grower with very shiny leaves and some wind resistance too.

Wildflame_resize.jpg

Here is one blooming in cool and wet January, just one month after a 100km/h windstorm.

10ENERO2006.jpg

Carlo, Tenerife

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Hi Carlo

I wish I knew the name of that one, its a very fast grower. 8 months ago it was just a small cutting now its a robust growing plant of about 70cm tall.

Dennis

Sub-tropical

Summer rainfall 1200mm

Annual average temp 21c

30 South

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Dennis If you prune it, I apply for a cutting !

If you need ID's, the second cordyline you have shown is quite surely cv.'Kiwi'.

I am familiar with it as this has been one a very few cordyline cultivars offered as indoor plants by the european nursery trade during years. It is actually a "greenhouse plant", because it is not a strong grower outdoors and it does not work well in marginal climates.

Carlo, Tenerife

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Here's one of my old favorites that grows differently every time I make a cutting.

post-51-1153397821_thumb.jpg

Happy Gardening

Cheers,

Wal

Queensland, Australia.

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