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Palms as perrenials??


Brad Mondel

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ok ok i know some people say that palms dont act as perennials but i have to disagree........here in zone 8b majesty palms sprout back from the roots/crown, anyone ever had this happen to them? i use to live in zone 6 and i grew chinese fan palm as perrenial every year,however they get huge trees where i live now YAY! LOL! :lol:

anyway name some palms that u think act as perrenials and some that u have grown or tested and let us know! :winkie:

any other tropicals that act as perrenials would be great too, i grow split leaf philodendron as perrenial here and gingers, things of that sort..... come on id love to hear from everyone!

post-3527-1246682663_thumb.jpg

Los Angeles, CA and Myrtle Beach, SC.

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Any palm that is treated as a perennial is most likely going to look very said if it ever gets any size to it from being stunted continuously. If your climate is limited I don't blame you, however!

Christian Faulkner

Venice, Florida - South Sarasota County.

www.faulknerspalms.com

 

Μολὼν λάβε

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pygmy date palms grow here in-town. there are a handful of specimens I know of that have multiple feet of trunk. I have even collected viable seed from local specimens and am currently growing seedlings from these palms.

these are small enough palms to plant n favorable warm microclimates. also easily available to find on the market, fairly cheap as well.

I have one on the SE side of my house tucked in a corner, most pygmys loose their leavs in winter on the few cold nights we get, they easily regrow full crowns in a season.

their leaves are fairly tender but the growth bud is hardier and cn take low 20's for sure and re grow in the spring.

I have a potted majesty here in zone 9a and it defoliates each winter but comes back with vigor. there a a few planted in ground around the city that come back as well.

these are common palms and cheap enough to experiment with.

Luke

Tallahassee, FL - USDA zone 8b/9a

63" rain annually

January avg 65/40 - July avg 92/73

North Florida Palm Society - http://palmsociety.blogspot.com/

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ok ok i know some people say that palms dont act as perennials but i have to disagree........here in zone 8b majesty palms sprout back from the roots/crown, anyone ever had this happen to them? i use to live in zone 6 and i grew chinese fan palm as perrenial every year,however they get huge trees where i live now YAY! LOL! :lol:

anyway name some palms that u think act as perrenials and some that u have grown or tested and let us know! :winkie:

any other tropicals that act as perrenials would be great too, i grow split leaf philodendron as perrenial here and gingers, things of that sort..... come on id love to hear from everyone!

Is that your perennial Bizzie?

Hmm. Many tropical plants can grow like that. Bananas especially some kinds will even fruit in Illinois the Land of Lincoln . . . .

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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well i was going to exspiriment with the bizzie this season,as long as the bud dosn't rot itll do good,there really cheap here around 20$

so i decided to exspiriment.......cheap stuff is a great way to go if your curious about a plants hardiness in a microclimate,not too big of a loss if it dies, i saw some queen palms for 5 $ each at hd today im going to get a few to exspiriment,there about 5 feet tall but anyway who else got exspiriments going on?

Los Angeles, CA and Myrtle Beach, SC.

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Serenoa repens (saw palmetto) behaves as a perennial in nature. It can put up with fire on a nearly annual basis, although this means few stems visible on the ground and leaves only about 60 cm tall. This photo is at Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park. With fire-managed vegetation in Florida, it's not easy to determine whether fire management is producing vegetation that looks as it would have 70, 150, or 600 years ago. However, the Prairie is home to the very narrowly endemic Florida grasshopper sparrow, which requires short grassland vegetation (like 60 cm) and can't have trees or other tall objects that serve as perches for predatory birds. Kissimmee Prairie was never abused or intentionally altered by its private owners; it's one of the finest bits of natural Florida.

post-275-1246779534_thumb.jpg

Park managers have been able to burn frequently enough (preferably in the early rainy season, as you see here) to reduce the height of the vegetation, which makes further burning easier. Unusually for Florida, lightning ignitions are fairly often left to burn their course, even overnight (Division of Forestry policy prefers morning ignition with everything out by dusk).

The saw palmettos don't look at all like the lush 1 to 2 meter plants that you typically see.

Unfortunately, the stems, even though mostly underground, do not tolerate much cold. I've heard of happy specimens in Eugene, Oregon, but I don't think there were any in Portland. In the Southeast, the palmetto's native range, which coincides pretty closely with the political boundaries of Florida, seems to coincide with the north boundary of hardiness zone 9A east of the Mississippi. Flora of North America

Fla. climate center: 100-119 days>85 F
USDA 1990 hardiness zone 9B
Current USDA hardiness zone 10a
4 km inland from Indian River; 27º N (equivalent to Brisbane)

Central Orlando's urban heat island may be warmer than us

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ive ben to kissimee we used to have a place there but we sold it,anyway we have alot of sereno repens up here there is quite large ones too (silver form) the tallest i seen was a 5 footer+?,they do really well here and you can get 3 gallon for 10$

Los Angeles, CA and Myrtle Beach, SC.

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I think of my bottle palm as a perennial. All the leaves get toasted in winter and it comes back in summer.

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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Serenoa repens (saw palmetto) behaves as a perennial in nature. It can put up with fire on a nearly annual basis, although this means few stems visible on the ground and leaves only about 60 cm tall. This photo is at Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park. With fire-managed vegetation in Florida, it's not easy to determine whether fire management is producing vegetation that looks as it would have 70, 150, or 600 years ago. However, the Prairie is home to the very narrowly endemic Florida grasshopper sparrow, which requires short grassland vegetation (like 60 cm) and can't have trees or other tall objects that serve as perches for predatory birds. Kissimmee Prairie was never abused or intentionally altered by its private owners; it's one of the finest bits of natural Florida.

post-275-1246779534_thumb.jpg

Park managers have been able to burn frequently enough (preferably in the early rainy season, as you see here) to reduce the height of the vegetation, which makes further burning easier. Unusually for Florida, lightning ignitions are fairly often left to burn their course, even overnight (Division of Forestry policy prefers morning ignition with everything out by dusk).

The saw palmettos don't look at all like the lush 1 to 2 meter plants that you typically see.

Unfortunately, the stems, even though mostly underground, do not tolerate much cold. I've heard of happy specimens in Eugene, Oregon, but I don't think there were any in Portland. In the Southeast, the palmetto's native range, which coincides pretty closely with the political boundaries of Florida, seems to coincide with the north boundary of hardiness zone 9A east of the Mississippi. Flora of North America

There is a small population of Serenoa repens just north and south of I-16 in Emmanuel County, GA south of Swainsboro, GA (zone 8). That is about equidistant from Macon and Augusta, GA and way north of the usual range for S. repens. There is also a relic population of S. repens in Screven County, GA about 1 hour south of Augusta. These Saw palmettos grow in old dune habitat with other vegetation that you wouldn't see until you go many miles south of these outlying populations. Saw Palmetto does very well as an ornamental in Augusta as long as it's planted in deep sand. Both the green and silver forms look good here. I have a silver one that I purchased from Dave Witt in Orlando several years ago. It is very silver and has not suffered any cold damage (upper teens) since it was planted out in 2006. Dave collected the seeds from a population around Hobe Sound, FL. For some reason, I don't think that there is any S. repens north of Edisto Island, SC. It is thick on Hunting Island and Fripp Island, but north of there, I haven't seen it growing wild. Someone from South Carolina, please correct me if I have missed the mark here.

Joseph C. Le Vert

Augusta, GA

USA

Zone 8

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Serenoa repens (saw palmetto) behaves as a perennial in nature. It can put up with fire on a nearly annual basis, although this means few stems visible on the ground and leaves only about 60 cm tall. This photo is at Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park. With fire-managed vegetation in Florida, it's not easy to determine whether fire management is producing vegetation that looks as it would have 70, 150, or 600 years ago. However, the Prairie is home to the very narrowly endemic Florida grasshopper sparrow, which requires short grassland vegetation (like 60 cm) and can't have trees or other tall objects that serve as perches for predatory birds. Kissimmee Prairie was never abused or intentionally altered by its private owners; it's one of the finest bits of natural Florida.

post-275-1246779534_thumb.jpg

Park managers have been able to burn frequently enough (preferably in the early rainy season, as you see here) to reduce the height of the vegetation, which makes further burning easier. Unusually for Florida, lightning ignitions are fairly often left to burn their course, even overnight (Division of Forestry policy prefers morning ignition with everything out by dusk).

The saw palmettos don't look at all like the lush 1 to 2 meter plants that you typically see.

Unfortunately, the stems, even though mostly underground, do not tolerate much cold. I've heard of happy specimens in Eugene, Oregon, but I don't think there were any in Portland. In the Southeast, the palmetto's native range, which coincides pretty closely with the political boundaries of Florida, seems to coincide with the north boundary of hardiness zone 9A east of the Mississippi. Flora of North America

There is a small population of Serenoa repens just north and south of I-16 in Emmanuel County, GA south of Swainsboro, GA (zone 8). That is about equidistant from Macon and Augusta, GA and way north of the usual range for S. repens. There is also a relic population of S. repens in Screven County, GA about 1 hour south of Augusta. These Saw palmettos grow in old dune habitat with other vegetation that you wouldn't see until you go many miles south of these outlying populations. Saw Palmetto does very well as an ornamental in Augusta as long as it's planted in deep sand. Both the green and silver forms look good here. I have a silver one that I purchased from Dave Witt in Orlando several years ago. It is very silver and has not suffered any cold damage (upper teens) since it was planted out in 2006. Dave collected the seeds from a population around Hobe Sound, FL. For some reason, I don't think that there is any S. repens north of Edisto Island, SC. It is thick on Hunting Island and Fripp Island, but north of there, I haven't seen it growing wild. Someone from South Carolina, please correct me if I have missed the mark here.

Joseph C. Le Vert

Augusta, GA

USA

Zone 8

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Serenoa repens (saw palmetto) behaves as a perennial in nature. It can put up with fire on a nearly annual basis, although this means few stems visible on the ground and leaves only about 60 cm tall. This photo is at Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park. With fire-managed vegetation in Florida, it's not easy to determine whether fire management is producing vegetation that looks as it would have 70, 150, or 600 years ago. However, the Prairie is home to the very narrowly endemic Florida grasshopper sparrow, which requires short grassland vegetation (like 60 cm) and can't have trees or other tall objects that serve as perches for predatory birds. Kissimmee Prairie was never abused or intentionally altered by its private owners; it's one of the finest bits of natural Florida.

post-275-1246779534_thumb.jpg

Park managers have been able to burn frequently enough (preferably in the early rainy season, as you see here) to reduce the height of the vegetation, which makes further burning easier. Unusually for Florida, lightning ignitions are fairly often left to burn their course, even overnight (Division of Forestry policy prefers morning ignition with everything out by dusk).

The saw palmettos don't look at all like the lush 1 to 2 meter plants that you typically see.

Unfortunately, the stems, even though mostly underground, do not tolerate much cold. I've heard of happy specimens in Eugene, Oregon, but I don't think there were any in Portland. In the Southeast, the palmetto's native range, which coincides pretty closely with the political boundaries of Florida, seems to coincide with the north boundary of hardiness zone 9A east of the Mississippi. Flora of North America

There is a small population of Serenoa repens just north and south of I-16 in Emmanuel County, GA south of Swainsboro, GA (zone 8). That is about equidistant from Macon and Augusta, GA and way north of the usual range for S. repens. There is also a relic population of S. repens in Screven County, GA about 1 hour south of Augusta. These Saw palmettos grow in old dune habitat with other vegetation that you wouldn't see until you go many miles south of these outlying populations. Saw Palmetto does very well as an ornamental in Augusta as long as it's planted in deep sand. Both the green and silver forms look good here. I have a silver one that I purchased from Dave Witt in Orlando several years ago. It is very silver and has not suffered any cold damage (upper teens) since it was planted out in 2006. Dave collected the seeds from a population around Hobe Sound, FL. For some reason, I don't think that there is any S. repens north of Edisto Island, SC. It is thick on Hunting Island and Fripp Island, but north of there, I haven't seen it growing wild. Someone from South Carolina, please correct me if I have missed the mark here.

Here is a picture of S. repens 'silver' in Augusta. This plant came originally from Woodlanders Nursery in Aiken, SC. Bob McCartney collected the seed. I'll have to ask him where he got it.

DSCN1311.jpg

Joseph C. Le Vert

Augusta, GA

USA

Zone 8

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i dont beleive sereno repens is native here however it is planted alot around here, we do however have native sabal minors everywhere along the higways in the forests understory, i havn't seen any large sabal palmetto wold here except down towards charleston there is alot of wild ones growing near the higway as your on your way to charleston, anyway id say pheonix roebelini (spelling?) is pereniel here if it's planted underneath a evergreen tree like a live oak,ive seen them in garden city regrowing from winter :rolleyes:

Los Angeles, CA and Myrtle Beach, SC.

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