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2024 NEW CALEDONIA BIENNIAL REGISTRATION/INFORMATION - Exceptional Adventure ×

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/02/2023 in all areas

  1. https://www.palmpedia.net/palmsforcal/Presteoa_acuminata_var._acuminata This link shows my previous attempt to grow this palm. Unfortunately the original ones died several years ago. I was fortunate to receive 3 seedlings a few years ago from a Bay Area plantsman, after his return from a visit to Ecuador. I raised them up to 3-gallon citrus pot size and have ground planted two in my garden today. The third one I gave to a fellow palm gardener here in SF. When I receive a gift of special plant material I don't consider it to be truly mine until I can pass some along to a third person. Anyone else growing this in California ? Here is the image of one I planted today !
    12 points
  2. Check out this amazing recovery of young royals in McAllen Jul 2015 - somewhat newly planted April 2021 ~ 2 months post palmageddon April 2022 ~ 14 months post palmageddon October 2022 ~ 20 months of recovery...decent vertical growth too!
    5 points
  3. I have never delayed planting relative to the "seasons", which hardly matter here at all. Check out my seasonal temperatures. In the next few weeks or months I will install two Howeas, a Hedyscepe, a Pritchardia, and an Arenga.
    5 points
  4. Most of the A. mexicana in south Texas came from north of Tampico.
    4 points
  5. It looks very good if it gets the care it needs. Here's some urban Acrocomia Aculeata's in Merida. The south Mexico form which is a bit dwarf-ish. This is the same type of Acrocomia I recieved.
    4 points
  6. These Houston queens survived 18F winter storm with ice in 2018. Here they are in Feb 2021 a day or two before the end of the world. They recover quickly when given the chance.
    4 points
  7. Another variegated mule palm seedling potted up.
    3 points
  8. The palm was recovering all summer from the previous winter that almost didn't make it. Until January the weather has been very mild and dry. But now in February for the next few days we'll have some cold weather and rains. Not good for the cocos but ofcourse we need the rain here on the island. I try now to keep the roots as dry as possible. I hope it will help. I hope your cocos will be OK in the winter. You might need a bigger pot soon. Will you plant it in the ground in the future?
    3 points
  9. Does well here and I have just germinated a batch of NZ produced seed. Colour is not quite on a par with a Lipstick palm but fabulous all the same.
    3 points
  10. Ice is the absolute worst . 👇 25 years ago I went through this 👇 Some places 3” of ice. High tension lines crumbled like slinkies. Folks without power for over a month in January in the north east. 🥶 when weather calls for freezing rain take it seriously, it’s extremely hard to predict much like climate change. 🥳
    3 points
  11. Croc’s are a whole different ballpark when compared to alligators. To Australians, Florida crocodiles would be like little pussycats. In Australia, and other areas around the world, I would obey the signs!
    3 points
  12. As we have yet another Polar Vortex in December which has become all too common in the last 13 years, I look out at a garden full of damaged palms. They will survive but be unsightly for a couple of years, AGAIN. They were just growing out of the last damage 2 years earlier. I will have to look at that and pick up endless fronds while cursing them. Take my advice, even though we are classified at Zone 9a plant palms safe for Zone 8a like Mules, Chamaerops, Chamaedorea, etc and save yourself from the ugliness.
    2 points
  13. I have a 13ft syagrus romanzoffianana and a 6ft one in London and its not babied at all completed unprotected. The only thing it's babied with is lots of fertilizer and water in the summer. Never protected in the winter there is no need to. I think the issue for BC is the winters are too wet and cool. Here's also a better photo of the one from lamorran gardens during the end of the summer. London is also warmer than mild parts of BC through every month of the year. Part of the reason why in central London they would survive compared to there is it's a zone 9b/10a and the fact Tofino has 6.4x more rainfall than here annually.
    2 points
  14. Adventurous washies in Amsterdam in December
    2 points
  15. How fast do your robustas grow? From everything I've read and seen so far Washingtonias seem to grow almost as fast for me as they do in the South West of the US. I think this might be true because the biggest variety of palms comes from regions close to the equator BUT about the most commonly planted palms I'm not so sure. Last year I noticed that many of my palms (and even other exotic plants) increased their growth in late summer/early autmn. It looked like they appreciated the somewhat cooler temperatures combined with some rain.
    2 points
  16. Lampedusa is very windy: perhaps it would be a good place to attempt outdoor Cocos growing, but I think Linosa would be even better.
    2 points
  17. First of all, I obviously wasn't saying that England in general is subtropical. Far from it. We all know that the UK in general is temperate/oceanic, although there is a clear argument for southeast regions (including London) being borderline Mediterranean nowadays. I was laughed at for saying this 2-3 years ago, then last summer of course had less rain than many parts of California with some places registering 0.0mm for July. Some places only saw about 0.7 inches across all 3 summer months. The climate in southern England is a bit more complex than it just being standard oceanic/temperate across the board. Like there is a clear difference between the far southwest and far southeast of England. Regarding the Isles of Scilly, they technically aren't humid subtropical as they do not meet the definition of having an average summer temperature above 22C / 72F. However it is somewhat misleading as NYC technically meets the subtropical criteria, despite the fact that you cannot even grow a Trachycarpus Fortunei in NYC outside of the immediate coastal area on say Long Beach. Even there they probably won't be long term with freezes wiping them out every 20 years or so. Clearly the Isles of Scilly are more tropical-like than NYC in that they are generally frost-free and can grow wide range of subtropical fauna, despite the lack of proper summer heat. Going by that metric alone, I would say that places like Tresco are 'temperate subtropical', even though that that isn't a technical term. We'll have to agree to disagree on this however. Also I have posted photos of 50+ year old Phoenix Canariensis on the UK mainland before. This one for instance would have survived the brutal freezes of 1963, 1987 and 2010 back when it was much smaller. I certainly wouldn't be making comparisons between Germany and England when it comes to palm growing potential. I don't think there is a single, long-term or mature CIDP anywhere in Germany. You say that it will only take one event to wipe out most of the UK ones, yet this one has clearly survived the test of time. Not to mention this winter we have had 2 very bad freezes with the coldest temperatures in London for 3-4 decades. The mature CIDP at least are pretty much bulletproof in many areas on the mainland now.
    2 points
  18. I'm sorry but I have to correct this, it all depends on what part of the PNW you are in, its a large area. PNW encompasses some of British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho and parts of Montana. Much of it is actually cold and dry being composed of grasslands, mountainous regions, high desert and actual desert. It's hard to generalize over such a large area. Only a very small area would be considered similar to the UK. The coastal communities in WA, BC and OR would be the closest to the UK as they have much cooler temps in summer compared to inland areas. However there can be a large differential or multiplier of the amount of sunshine hours per year. And these areas are only a small fraction of what makes up the PNW. There is a common misconception of what it is like here, and I was guilty of that too before I started living here. Summers/Fall are totally different at my location than the UK, what is considered a heat wave in the UK is typical weather here, never mind we get about 2x the annual sunshine hours. Our winters and spring are similar so I would give you about 50% of the year. Just like California, as you move inland the temps rise. San Francisco is often foggy and cool but once you get close to Stockton or Sacramento the temps increase dramatically. The UK around London is considered a humid temperate oceanic climate, which aligns with many of our coastal communities. Once you get inland a bit most of Western Oregon falls under warm-summer mediterranean climate and further down it is hot-summer mediterranean climate. Sorry but I keep seeing the people compare to the two regions and I feel the need to clarify. It's like saying Florida and California are the same because they stay warm in winter.
    2 points
  19. Not offhand, no. Mine are producing seeds now, so maybe I will get a few seedlings to come up variegated, but I'm not holding my breath.
    2 points
  20. I also think the strong sun works both ways, during growing season the palm itself is warmer than ambient air temperature. During cold winter periods the palm also warms up more than the air temps. This is significant for the chances of survival in winter and for thriving during growth season. At our latitude a palm is almost never warmer than the ambient winter air temps. Perhaps slightly against a south facing brick wall, but even that works only for a slight distance off the wall. I once planted an archontophoenix cunninghamiana and protected it by an infra red lamp aimed at the trunk, connected to a timer during frosts. It easily surivived the cold frostnights in Amsterdam.
    2 points
  21. The idea of planting palms seems to conjure notions of tropical climates being hot all the time. But some palms don’t require heat so much as simply not being too cold. That’s why you see palms in Britain which nobody would consider tropical. The temperature swings in the Bay Area are low and much different than ours. Hot for that area is often short lived and not enough to significantly warm the ground. I doubt that it makes much difference for planting. If a palm will be happy in that area, it will probably not mind being planted now.
    2 points
  22. I second that queens are hardy in the low 20's. I hit 19f last winter & they took some leaf burn ( 50% maybe). This is a picture a few weeks after 22f this winter, still green. Unfortunately we hit 20f last night. I won't be home until tomorrow night but I'm sure queens will still be green since we heated up to 56f today. Seems like it was a brief dip.
    2 points
  23. The million dollar question. Fantastic job with your coconut @Stelios
    2 points
  24. Thank you! I think I am going to end up taking this one off his hands 😜
    2 points
  25. I'm in Fair Oaks Ranch, and this is how it looks here:
    2 points
  26. Eric @ Leu Gardens said that Saribus really likes the wetter areas at Leu. I found they like part shade, and tend to yellow out in full sun. I moved my two small ones to part shade and they are a lot greener.
    2 points
  27. D. Marojejyi and A. Vestiaria going to flower this year.
    2 points
  28. I sold Palmpedia several months ago to someone who has the resources and passion to keep it going. It became too much for me alone to continue and provide the time and expense to do it justice. The new owner is an IPS Member, and a long time lurker on PalmTalk. He is a terrific guy, capable businessman, and a palm/plant lover. I think it is a good fit, and the future of the site is in better hands now that he is involved. Give him time, and I expect many more improvements. Thanks to all those who provided financial and emotional support during its creation and almost 20 year run so far. I too use the site often, and hope to for another 20 years.
    2 points
  29. Rhapidophyllum hystrix ‘moonshine’
    2 points
  30. This is my deodar cedar, I’ve had it in the ground since august 2021, it’s a little scraggly but over all it has been doing OK so far for a plant that’s not adapted to this climate. Has anyone else tried one of these in Florida? I don’t recall seeing one at Leu.
    1 point
  31. Do you mean these ones? https://www.google.com/maps/@43.2748692,-2.9616986,3a,40.4y,163.35h,102.44t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sSJ6tyOv1KLHfkhwnDKWp_w!2e0!7i16384!8i8192
    1 point
  32. The cote d’azur is quite a wealthy place in Europe though so I'd imagine people there are more likely to be interested and willing to spend money to have a stand out beautiful looking garden than the majority of Europe. Even then I'd say wealthier parts of California still have more interesting gardens.
    1 point
  33. At least for here hardly anyone in the mildest parts of the UK tried archontophoenix for example and now in the last few years a few gardens and people have and have seen that they do really well. Europe has a higher population than Canada and the USA and I'd say there are more Canadians and Americans on palm talk than there are Europeans. The same is true for people trying things. The UK has a funny climate where in a short distance in certain areas you can go from being able to push lots of exotics to not being able to.
    1 point
  34. Sorry but not here. People around Amsterdam keep planting washingtonias, CIDP’s, agaves and other stuff that gets killed every few winters. The only plants that easily survive and thrive here are trachies, chamaerops and yucca rostratas. Dozens to hundreds of each grow here beautifully by people without expertise.
    1 point
  35. Mine grows more than 2 fronds a year. Either way I don't know many people trying things in the UK and the ones who do usually don't document things such as the soil it's growing in or a specific location. I also agree that here in central London it is very different to the rest of the UK since king palms, kentias, nikaus grow here, in fact my potted Bismarckia has been left outside and is completely fine which theres no way anywhere else it in the UK would be able to survive year round outside without declining since the rest of the UK is either too cool in the summer or too cold in the winter.
    1 point
  36. No link but it belonged to an IPS member who now resides in Malta. I also had contact with a palmgrower in the outskirts of London that has several queens since around 6 years. The one against the south wall manages 2 fronds, the others 1. Nice and i would definitely do the same in your location, i actually had a largish queen for a couple of years, but it’s still very slow so unsuitable in a windy coastal UK location because the fronds will brown from windy daytemps of 6C.
    1 point
  37. It's funny because from a distance they look like queen palms and then at a second glance it's like "wait a minute...". They really look nice especially in those rows. I think they should be more common even outside of Latinoamerica.
    1 point
  38. I think that is correct, queens seem to respond to strong UV/sun. They can survive and push 2 fronds in mild area’s with occasional UV6, but really start pushing in UV7/8 area’s like the south of France.
    1 point
  39. Wow! Those are so incredibly beautiful! I have been looking for one for quite a while and I haven’t even been able to find any pictures online either so thank you for posting pictures! Do you by chance know where to get more? I’d love to add one to my collection
    1 point
  40. 1 point
  41. You definitely got hit harder at least your soil temperature is above freezing that helps a lot.
    1 point
  42. Warming up here today and the ice starting to gradually melt... nearly 30F for the first time since Monday. Supposed to hit 34F this afternoon, back to 30 overnight, then we climb out of this tomorrow.. I've been documenting this all along the way so it will be interesting to see everything growing out of the brown fronds this summer. Again.. plant those Sabals everyone.
    1 point
  43. For local pickup in San Diego, grown in part shade.
    1 point
  44. Amara on left and Botryophora on right.
    1 point
  45. This is my majesty. I couldn't take a better photo. Is close to a very well grown phoenix roebelenii and it has some competition for water and nutrients.
    1 point
  46. 1 point
  47. This is at very nice nursery in the back of Waimanalo, Oahu. Hawaii. Cool how it has kept its variegation even as a very mature fruiting tree. aloha
    1 point
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