Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. Minimalism at it's best. Looks great.
  3. Today
  4. palmfriend

    Borassus aethiopum in habitat (Uganda)

    I LOVE palmtalk for this!! Thank you so much for sharing! Lars
  5. Hi there, since there was no reply - honestly I was afraid of a comment warning me of a possibly extreme root sensitiveness - I took it as a GO and went to work last Sunday. I dug it out very carefully and put it in its new place immediately... - watered it and made a mark at the newest spear. Today - four days later - I made a first check... Yep, looks still good... ...and the new spear clearly went on growing! I have got another one that grows so well and is already turning into a real beauty - so I thought what a waste to let this one starve in the cramped spot... I am very happy that it seems a D. album var. aureum can be moved - at least at a young age - thank you for you time again! Best regards from Okinawa - Lars
  6. Beautiful photos Jason.......wow! Tim
  7. RJ

    Public Landscaping Questions

    Ah you're right didn't even notice. Good catch.
  8. BS Man about Palms

    C houailou Showing Some Color

    Thanks Tracy! I missed this earlier! I got lucky to pick a spectacular palm to stand front and center!
  9. Beautiful visuals...Thanks Love, Kris.
  10. Hilo Jason

    Borassus aethiopum in habitat (Uganda)

    This area is also home to many large Sausage Trees - Kigelia Africana: Thanks for looking!
  11. Hilo Jason

    Borassus aethiopum in habitat (Uganda)

    Ugandan Kob give good scale for these large Borassus palms: Water buffalo standing behind a very large ant / termite mound: Jackson’s Hartebeest:
  12. Hilo Jason

    Borassus aethiopum in habitat (Uganda)

    Sonrise drive through the park to see Giraffes and many other amazing animals and Borassus! Getting stared down by a hyena:
  13. My family and I just got back from a trip to Uganda. Even though we lived in country for a year and a half back in 2014-2015, we never made it to Murchison Falls National Park. So we took the opportunity to go there on this recent trip. Murchison Falls is in Northern Uganda, just south of the S. Sudan border and just east of the Congo border. At the top of Murchison Falls, the Nile forces its way through a gap in the rocks, only 7 metres wide, and tumbles 43 metres, before flowing westward into Lake Albert. And the below photo shows the river, after the falls, flowing on its way to Lake Albert: This area of northern Uganda is home to many Borassus aethiopum. This thread will show some of the many pictures I took in the park. Sorry some of the quality is not the greatest as I was only on my iPhone and some of these were taken while our vehicle was moving. But I hope you enjoy.
  14. Chris Wilson

    Palms flash!

    Trachycarpus Fortunei
  15. cainester

    C houailou Showing Some Color

    tracy, i too live in leucadia. is yours planted out in full sun or did you surround it in shade? I am going to plant mine in the ground soon.
  16. BS Man about Palms

    C houailou Showing Some Color

    Thanks for the kind comments and appreciation! TJ- The "stocky" palm to the left is a mystery Sabal I found in a 5 gal pot at the orange box store... I posted about it years ago, I'm very sure its a hybrid with a minor.. just not sure what. It's been seeding for years. I think maybe a hybrid with blackburniana? Jim-I'm going to update my new cal thread soon. I think it's age is known there...IIRC 7-8 years from a squat 10 gal pot. Dean- That one actually originated from So Florida. I have several houailous in pots.. and that one had the shortest pot, thus a smaller hole to dig in my clay. It has been a rocket from day one. GENERAL INFO... for what ever reason, my nickname for this palm when young is the "Weeble" palm.. as in "Weebles wobble, but they don't fall down".. I cannot think of a single one in a pot past say 2 gal size that has not pushed itself up from the soil. they just rock back and forth in the pot, but seem to just keep chugging along. when I planted that palm it took a year at least to "lock in" and not move in the ground. I used large rocks to brace the base and briefly had it tied in place.
  17. Hammer

    Brazilian Apple Banana

    Here's a site that makes up for in information what it lacks in design and layout. Hope it helps. http://webebananas.com/culture.html
  18. Ryagra

    Your soil mix, tell us

    40% potting soil 40% perlite 20% native sand. Desert plants just native soil.
  19. Tracy

    Coconut palm substitute

    What other clumping Dypsis have you tried their in Riverside with success? Dypsis pembana tends to get beat up here in the winter cold, and is susceptible to burn even here on the coast when it gets hot and dry. Dypsis onilahensis and heteromorpha are the best looking for me on the coast. I know D heteromorpha also does well further inland with less humidity and more heat. Either of those will provide much narrower trunks but a tropical look. Ravenea glauca and Dypsis plumosa might also be options when it comes to solitary with narrow trunks. You and Chris would be the ones to have tested all these species there in Riverside and Moreno Valley.
  20. Silas_Sancona

    Coconut questions / identification

    A natural spring would Help them deal with the heat for sure. Phoenix' yearly rainfall average is approx. 8" / 203mm/ yr. maybe 1-2" more here in Chandler, S.E. of Downtown Phoenix. Were lucky if we get 2.50"-3.00" / 63.5-76.2mm of rain during our Summer Monsoon season. Usually get a bit less. Head south, get more rain. Tucson averages approx. 15" or 381mm of rain / yr. Problem is their winter lows which can dip below 0c more often than here. Once you get south of the U.S. / Mexico border, esp. closer to the coast of the Gulf of CA. ( San Carlos / Guaymas ) rain ( 222mm/ yr in Guaymas ), especially in the summer, starts to increase and lows below 1 or 2c are rare, or, much less of a possibility than here. Humidity and dew points are much more favorable there most of the year also. Takes some interesting weather dynamics to pull moisture from the Gulf up this way, and usually occurs only a few times during the summer normally. Outside a Palm collector's care, our section of the Sonoran Desert is a pretty hostile place for Cocos. That might change in the future however..
  21. Stelios

    Coconut palm substitute

    For me Ravenea rivularis is also a palm that can have some coconut look. It needs a lot of water to look the best but it should be easy to find in a good price. For a more mini version there is Ravenea glauca.
  22. greysrigging

    Coconut questions / identification

    Many many years ago I brought some sprouted coconut seeds down from Darwin to a remote lead, silver,zinc mine called Cadjebut.....located about 50 miles from the evil remorselessly hot Western Australian town of Fitzroy Crossing. The sorta place that averages over 100f for 8 months of the year. I also planted a couple of Carpentaria Palms. We planted the palms out in the beer garden of the Wet Mess which had a natural spring that became a swimming pool. Both species grew ok without shade, although they looked very ratty and tatty during the hottest months ( Oct - Dec ) and suffered sunburn of course. They always came good with the arrival of monsoonal rains. So they withstood the heat, but the thing that really helped them thrive was the wet feet from the natural spring ( topped up from de watering the underground workings ) Heat and ample watering is the key.... dry and low humidity is as much an enemy of the coconut as is cold wet feet in the Mediterranean climes so beloved of coconut growers away from the tropics. Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia https://www.weatherzone.com.au/climate/station.jsp?lt=site&lc=3093
  23. mistyinca

    Coconut palm substitute

    I was looking at your avatar thinking you must be pretty close! Howdy neighbor!
  24. Silas_Sancona

    Sharing my Sonoran yard

    Stunning Adeniums T.B. It amazes me how good stuff that can be quite a challenge to grow up here, does just a few hundred miles due south.. Yet both areas share numerous other things that grow fine in both places. Too bad the Gulf of CA didn't extend just a bit further north, ( ..and east ).. lol
  1. Load more activity



×