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Jeff Searle

California Gardens 2008

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Jeff Searle

This is one of my favorite trees. I'm posing for scale with Ficus dammaropsis.

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Gtlevine

Jeff, nice pics and I will do the clarifying.

Post 60 - 2 Jubaea with CIDP in Background

Post 61 - 2 Pseudophoenix Sargentii, not Decipians

Post 63 - Brahea Armata

Post 66 - Allouadia Procera

Post 67 - Boojum in front of Ken and rock

Post 71 - Preostoea Montana

Post 75 - xButyagrus F2, from seed off Huntington xButyagrus

Post 77 - Ravenea Glauca

Post 78 - Ravenea Glauca

Hope this clears things up, thanks for posting and I will see you next week.

Gary

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Jeff Searle

A close-up of the leaf, showing just how big this plant is.

This concludes the tour at Gary's.

Gary,

Thanks for taking the time to show us all around. You have a great garden with many nice palms, and just love the boulders.

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Jeff Searle

Gary,

     Thanks, at times I felt like a rookie.... :D

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LJG

(Gtlevine @ Feb. 01 2008,19:44)

QUOTE
Jeff, nice pics and I will do the clarifying.

Post 61 - 2 Pseudophoenix Sargentii, not Decipians

Jeff, I can understand how you would confuse Pseudophoenix Sargentii and D. Decipians. Now if you happened to be from Florida, or have been to Madagascar or even lets say you owned a palm nursery, well then I would give you a hard time for missing this one .....   :P

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osideterry

All of the place you went are on now my list of gardens to see. Thanks for the tour.

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BS Man about Palms

(LJG @ Feb. 01 2008,20:42)

QUOTE

(Gtlevine @ Feb. 01 2008,19:44)

QUOTE
Jeff, nice pics and I will do the clarifying.

Post 61 - 2 Pseudophoenix Sargentii, not Decipians

Jeff, I can understand how you would confuse Pseudophoenix Sargentii and D. Decipians. Now if you happened to be from Florida, or have been to Madagascar or even lets say you owned a palm nursery, well then I would give you a hard time for missing this one .....   :P

:P :P :P:D

lol

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DoomsDave

Been to those gardens, wanna come visit again!

And again.

And . . .

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bgl

Jeff,

Thanks for all the great photos! And Gary - lots of spectacular palms! :) I'm still very curious to see how D. decipiens will grow here compared to SoCal, and based on what I've read in POM (and the pictures I've seen), your environment seems to be very close to their native one. But I still have great hopes for the ones here! :)

Bo-Göran

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Gtlevine

(bgl @ Feb. 02 2008,12:04)

QUOTE
Jeff,

Thanks for all the great photos! And Gary - lots of spectacular palms! :) I'm still very curious to see how D. decipiens will grow here compared to SoCal, and based on what I've read in POM (and the pictures I've seen), your environment seems to be very close to their native one. But I still have great hopes for the ones here! :)

Bo-Göran

Thanks for the compliment Bo. Considering the torture that my garden went through, I'm happy to have a few nice palms left. My Dypsis Decipians got fried and lost half it's leaves after the fire, thank goodness it survived.

Keep those large Dypsis I have been seeing in your nursery out of your garden, when I return to Hilo next fall I want to load them on the boat and send them east.

Gary

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Palmarum

Gary, you have a very extensive collection and I am glad it was mostly spared from the fires. Planting in and around those boulders has got to be interesting. Have you ever had to move them or remove one? I was in Pennsylvania for a while one time, and I watched one company move boulders around for purposes of landscaping. It did not look easy.

Ryan

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Jeff Searle

By mid-morning we left Gary's and drove over to Randy Moore's house. Randy's garden was only a few years old and was loaded with very nice palms. A look coming up to the front of his beautiful home.

Jeff

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Jeff Searle

A large Ravenea sp. Kingaly

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Jeff Searle

Some really beautiful blue Encephalartos.

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Jeff Searle

Ken and Bill showing me with what used to be a Bismarckia. The goffers got to this and killed it.

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Jeff Searle

Just one of many beautiful settings in Randy's yard.

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Jeff Searle

Another

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Jeff Searle

Pond setting

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Jeff Searle

The walkway leading up the conservatory.

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Jeff Searle

Inside the conservatory, we found a very nice collection of palms and other tropicals. This is looking down at the exposed roots of Verschaffeltia splendida.

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Jeff Searle

The always popular Areca vestiaria,Red Form.

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Jeff Searle

Upclose at a very robust Dypsis baronii.

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PatientPalms

Ok Cali guys, definate credit due to you guys...  I have seen some FANTASTIC collections!  Well manicured to jungle styles all with the rarest of rare plants.  The jubes and the ropos are outstanding!  Serious palm envy going on there...  I have done my best to just shut my yapper and take it all in.  WOW and WOW again! :D

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Gtlevine

Jeff, your last post, #103 was in Jeff Brusseau's garden, not Randy's. It is not Dypsis Baronii either, I asked Jeff about this palm and he bought it under the name Neophloga Affinis, this name is now Dypsis Scottiana. From the small size of the stems I believe this is a correct name.

Gary

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Jeff Searle

Gary,

     Sorry for the mix-up. I wasn't sure where we left Randy's house and then started at Jeff's house. They were both incredible gardens for sure. But, the palm in my photo  to me is just a D. baronii "type". I'm almost sure(maybe someone else can add to this) that this is not D. scottiana. D. scottiana has very thin stems, close to the diameter of a pencil,maybe  a little bigger, and the stems have a black coloring to it. Also the leaves are much more smaller. If you google search the name, you will see some pictures of it. Let me know.

Jeff

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Gtlevine

You may be right, but Neophloga Affinis is the name Jeff bought the palm under. Definately looks like a super mini Baronii, but the stems are only a couple inches thick so it is not Baronii. Anyway, we all loved it watever it may be.

Gary

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LJG

I am pretty sure this is the same plant in my yard and Bob DeJong's yard:

http://palmtalk.org/cgi-bin....y168662

I think this is the plant that Rancho Soledad sold as Neophloga Affinis and now calls Dypsis psammophila. It of course is not D. psammophila or D. scottiana. I think this is or closely related to Dypsis albofarinosa. I think this is what the Soledad plants look like in full Vista sun and in great soil with a Dosetron to help fertilize.

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Gtlevine

I think you are right Len, it looks closest to what Soledad has as Psammophila. This is the best guess at this point, but I am always unsure with these Dypsis.

Gary

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Jeff Searle

Len,

    Thanks for adding some thought, but I disagree thats it's D. albofarinosa either. These out there we saw are a yellow color and were robust, where D. albo. has a beautful white color in the crown of leaves. I would be willing to "bet the farm" on it, well almost. :D  When I see you guys next, I'll show you what i think is which. Should make for a good sit down round table discussion, ( but no beers). :D

Jeff

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LJG

Jeff, it might be closely related to Dypsis albofarinosa. :)

I have the Soledad plant and one of your true Albo's. I can barely tell the difference. One key thing that Dean pointed out to me last year is that the Soledad plant has the black flecks on the new leaf petioles where your true Albofarinosa does NOT. Other then this, the plants are almost the same. Of course it can only be guesses on this stuff. I think Jeff's is just excellently grown. What ever it is, I hope I have it as it is a beautiful plant as we all agreed.

I look forward to seeing your collection in April. It will certainly be a highlight.

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Jeff Searle

After finishing a tour at Randy Moore's house, we then arrived at Jeff Brusseau's garden. This is the entrance as we pulled up.

Jeff

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Jeff Searle

Jeff's garden had a superb collection of cycads. Actually, it was the most that I had ever seen in a private garden, short of Loran Whitelock's garden up in LA.

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Jeff Searle

This was an interesting plant I came across. I think it was called New Zealand Flax. The genus is Phorium(?). A beauty in the landscape. Does anyone know if this will grow here in South Florida ? I suppose not.

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Jeff Searle

I was told this was Encephalartos whitelockiana.

Jeff

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Jeff Searle

Len and Bill standing in front a massive Pandanus specie.

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Jeff Searle

Walkway through garden.

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Jeff Searle

Ravenea glauca(?)

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Jeff Searle

This was Trithrinax campestris. Something we don't see at home.

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Jeff Searle

Medd. fan palm.

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