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Palm Guy

Winter in Bermuda

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Palm Guy

Banyan tree

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Chinese Fan...very very invasive here...

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More Hurricane palms

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Palm Guy

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some young cocos...

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Orchid tree...thats all for now guys...hope you enjoyed winter in Bermuda...

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PalmGuyWC

Hi Michael,

I see your posting more photos of the palms of Bermuda. Thanks, and keep them coming. What a wonderful place you live on, tropical, but yet not to hot. There is another thread going on Parajubaeas, and I bet you get just enough winter chill for Parajubaeas to grow in Bermuda. I suspect there are many of the "nitch" palms that would grow there that have a narrow range of temperature requirements......such as the Loard Howe Palms, Rhopalostylis, and many others.

It's kind of strange that our paths have crossed on Palm Talk, as when I was looking for a screen name, I tried Palm Guy but it was already taken, (by you) so I selected PalmGuyWC.....the WC stands for Walnut Creek, my location.

Thanks again for the tour of Bermuda.

Dick

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Really full garden

Michael,I know that homes in Bermuda use cisterns to collect rain water so there is a limited amount.How do people water lawns and fill swimming pools.Can you buy more water if your cistern is not enough?

Gaussia maya is a native palm and I have never seen it used in landscaping here.It is one of my favorites.

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fastfeat

Michael--

Thanks for the great tour. Really looks like you've got the "best of both worlds" there. Kentias and coconuts. Way cool.

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tjwalters

(Palm Guy @ Feb. 25 2008,11:46)

QUOTE
anybody know what that suckering palm is next to the fishtail palm?

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Great shots.  Appears as if the clumper may be Acoelorrhaphe wrightii.

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koolthing78

(Palm Guy @ Feb. 25 2008,11:13)

QUOTE
Don't have many Veitchia on the Island, in fact I think this is the first specimen I've seen. Anybody know which one it is?

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Don't have many Veitchia on the Island, in fact I think this is the first specimen I've seen. Anybody know which one it is?

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I don't know much (well, anything) about palm identification in terms of specifics (crownshaft color, spines on petioles, etc), but just going on my general overall impression, it looks like pictures of V. winin I've seen from Miami.  I would *love* to be able to grow that palm here.

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koolthing78

(apparently, I also don't know much about quoting properly)

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Palm Guy
Hi Michael,

I see your posting more photos of the palms of Bermuda. Thanks, and keep them coming. What a wonderful place you live on, tropical, but yet not to hot. There is another thread going on Parajubaeas, and I bet you get just enough winter chill for Parajubaeas to grow in Bermuda. I suspect there are many of the "nitch" palms that would grow there that have a narrow range of temperature requirements......such as the Loard Howe Palms, Rhopalostylis, and many others.

Hi Dick,

I'd like to try Parajubaeas as well as Jubaea Chilensis and many other cold hardy palms. My ultimate goal is to have Lepidorrhachis mooreana and Cyrtostachys renda growing along side of each other. It would be very nice if I'm able to recreate conditions that both ultratropicals and cooler temperature palms can thrive together.  I would say that we have a mix of Florida and California weather. Not as cool as Cali but not as hot as Florida. I have a feeling that many of the ultra tropicals may not thrive here. I can see fungus problems in our damp wet winters.

Michael--

Thanks for the great tour. Really looks like you've got the "best of both worlds" there. Kentias and coconuts. Way cool.

Thanks more's a coming....

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Palm Guy
Michael,I know that homes in Bermuda use cisterns to collect rain water so there is a limited amount.How do people water lawns and fill swimming pools.Can you buy more water if your cistern is not enough?

Gaussia maya is a native palm and I have never seen it used in landscaping here.It is one of my favorites.

HI Scott,

We don't normally water our lawns as we get enough rainfull year round to keep them green, usually about 4-5 inches per month. But in the event of drought for which we are experiencing at the moment, there are water trucks that can be purchased which fill up our water tanks or swimming pools. Also, many people have wells that can be used to wash cars or water plants. What's your water system like in Guatemala? To be honest I didn't even know of Gaussia Maya till  Toby and a few others told me what it is was. I think they should be planted much more. They tend to hold very well in our limestone soil and handle our salt laden winds quite well. Kinda reminds me of a Cyphophoenix nucele.

Cheers,

Mike

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Palm Guy

Eric I think you may be right. It looks like Veitchia Winin.

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Palm Guy

Here are some pics of some of the more natural areas of Bermuda...Spittal Pond...Washingtonias and Sabals galore...

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Palm Guy

Back to the city for some Phoenix sylvestris...and yes that is a Pink and Blue bus your seeing...don't ask...

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Palm Guy

I think this is Ptychosperma elegans...

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Odd looking Hurricane palm...kinda looks like a cross...but I'm pretty sure insect attacks made the

leaves look stunted..

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Bottle palm has seen better days...

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Palm Guy

Hi all,

Since winter is just about done I figured this would be the last mass pictorial of Bermuda palms in winter...till maybe next year.  I included some photos of some of the more rural places, forest areas, beaches, nurseries, large estates, invasive species and Sabal Bermudana of course. Hope you enjoy!

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Cocos and View of the Sound (once the mouth of the volcano, now underwater)

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Palm Guy

Odd looking tree- Believe it originates from Madagascar...anyone know what it is?

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Elbow Beach...one of our more famous beaches

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Palm Guy

Residential parts - Can't wait till the power lines all go underground!

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Sabal Bermudana behind a Pytchosperma

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Palm Guy

Tomato farm in a forest outcropping. Lots of Livistona Chinensis growing around here. VERY invasive.

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Some roadside forests of Chinensis

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Palm Guy

Found this guy growing just outside the forest. Looks like a Pytchosperma or Adonidia. I know of Pytchosperma growing naturally here but not adonidia. What do you think????

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Chinensis growing in a tree stump.

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Loquat tree seedling growing amongst the Chinesis. Loquats and Surinam Cherry are some of the invasive fruits on the island. Islanders don't seem to mind them though. They're both delicious!

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Palm Guy

Bermudana vs Chinensis...?? A constant struggle between the two species and it seems as though Chinensis is winning by a long shot due it its much faster growth rate.

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Bermuda Mangroves...The northern most Mangrove trees in the world. I think there are two species. Black and Red.

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Palm Guy

Bermuda stone walls the way the old masons used to do it.

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closer shot of the mangroves

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large estate with cocos and mangroves.

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Palm Guy

MINI -COCO...its quite odd looking, almost like a dwarfed version. Kinda appealing if you ask me. Possibly due to poor soil condition.

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another view

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another large estate.

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Palm Guy

lagoon with boats and more cocos

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Palm Guy

I'm beginning to think that this is not the standard Dictyosperma Album. We must have two varieties on the island. This guy here has the heavy leaf look, almost as if they are too heavy to support themselves.

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Drive-by fruiting. Anyone know this variety of fruit?

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Palm Guy

Senegal Date - very invasive here also. I nearly didn't stop. Anybody have that problem of getting into near accidents because you were looking up at palm trees while driving?

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Another drive-by of a fellow palm lover's house. Might have to get them to join the forum!

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Palm Guy

Goin to take a break and go outside to do some yard work! Cheers guys. More to come in a little bit!

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FRITO

Michael, I enjoy all your photos! thanks for sharing these.'

Those stone walls are really cool. love the look.

Interesting how invasive those L. chinesis are.  your climate and wildlife must really like that species.

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Palm Guy

Took some pics of a government funded nursery. Plants arent for sale here but you can certainly have a look. Many of the roadway palms come from here.

A VERY fat gaussia maya or more likely a royal. Not sure...

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Pritchardia Pacifica or Thurstonii...not sure...

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Palm Guy

Thrinax radiata

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An oleander in flower. Sure sign that spring is just around the corner or maybe already here.

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Avenue of palms. Notice how those Dictyospermas have drooping leaves? Anybody know if this is a variant of the normal species? We have many of these particular palms and they tend to be smaller in both height and crown size.

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Palm Guy

Baby Pytchosperma growing underneath its mother.

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Palm Guy

look at this baby!

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Palm Guy

another view...

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Palm Guy

YET another...with my many hand for reference...please excuse the Yeti arms...I must  be related to Robin Williams.

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Palm Guy

another odd hurricane palm...almost looks like a kentia cross...hmmm

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Palm Guy

Crownshaft of the hurricane palm...

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Palm Guy

raphis excelsa in full sun??

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