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Kentiopsis oliviformis

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ExperimentalGrower
7 hours ago, gtsteve said:

@ExperimentalGrower, It has not moved at all. I didn't even notice a heal when I planted it or since.

From the top side it comes out quite yellow (which I like), before greening up but it is too hard to get that shot.

Interesting! I have a small seedling that is already expressing a significant heal. It seems some species that are known to have heals sometimes also don’t have them in certain specimens. Weird.

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steve99

Mine has been slow but a steady grower all the same.

 

 

2wu0quh.jpg

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gtsteve

Wow, that is quite spectacular, it is good that you have the space to display it well.

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sonoranfans
19 hours ago, Merlyn said:

My Fallaensis and Macroglossa (probable hybrid per NatureGirl) definitely showed some extra potassium-deficiency yellowing over the winter.  Is that a typical symptom of an alkaline-loving palm unhappy with the local acidic soil?  If so, how much extra dolomitic lime do you add to your Cuban Copernicias?

Potassium deficiency is very common and a constant battle here for cuban copernicias.  This winter, for some reason, was worse than others for my palms.  It seemed kind of wet for winter to me, not sure.   I added sulpomag after dolomitic lime a few weeks back and noticed an immediate greening up in my kentiopsis so I expect their pale nature was partly due to soil pH being low.    Potassium deficiency (yellow/brown)speckeling is permanent so its still there on older leaves, Mg is general yellowing and can be corrected in an older leaf.  I do think that copernicias from cuba are all more difficult to grow in our area and the deficiencies to mine have been even more problematic when they are in pots.  In miami area, the rocky alkaline soil is pretty much what they want.  Because they are such fertilizer pigs, sandy soil is tough and organics keep getting digested in the heat so cation exchange is dleted int he soil.  You need cation exchange to retain potassium in the soil as long as possible.  Differnt plants function in different pH zones as well so its not surprise that palm species have varying preferences to grow their best.  Note the deficiencies in this table for acidic soil   

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Merlyn
1 hour ago, sonoranfans said:

Potassium deficiency is very common and a constant battle here for cuban copernicias.  This winter, for some reason, was worse than others for my palms.  It seemed kind of wet for winter to me, not sure.   I added sulpomag after dolomitic lime a few weeks back and noticed an immediate greening up in my kentiopsis so I expect their pale nature was partly due to soil pH being low.

Last winter I didn't notice anything unusual on the Cubans, but this winter they had a lot of potassium yellowing, especially on the Macroglossa.  New leaves look great, but the translucent yellow/orange spots on the older fronds are pretty dramatic.  The box stores only carry regular lawn lime and Sunniland, which appears to be 10% dolomite and 90% calcitic lime.  The only one readily available seems to be a 6.75lb of dolomitic lime "Espoma Garden Lime."  Do you have a preferred source? 

I also have a lot of wood ash from burning all those stumps I've been digging up, that stuff is very basic and pretty high in potassium.  Most plants wouldn't like it, but the Cubans might!

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NatureGirl

My Kentiopsis with this years crop of un-ripe seeds. Plus seedlings from last years crop.

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sonoranfans

I put down 120 lb dolomite rock last year for my two in ground cubans and have used the garden lime, 5 lbs per tree for the cubans.  Kentiopsis got some lesser amounts of garden lime and pulverized limestone.    THe dolomite is slower release over longer times but its good to have.

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msporty

Mine has been a steady grower. New leaves are glaucous but it washes out quickly if it rains. I’m hoping mine starts to have that typical upright growth habit, as mine tends to get droopy. My wife doesn’t like the leaves hanging over the walkway. 
 

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EF5D9D79-04D4-4E88-BC76-0825484B46BE.thumb.jpeg.63df511ac4f84d8fd03f5c942f125ee6.jpeg

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Merlyn

Here's my KO, bought recently from FishEyeAquaculture.  I had to stake it because a couple of days after planting it was leaned over about 45 degrees.  It was either heavy winds or one of the neighborhood black bears stomping on it.  I'm attributing the slightly yellowed tips to a relatively quick sun acclimation, and of course transplant shock with a wee bit o' bear stomping.  Off the left is an Encephalartos Ituriensis triple, and off to the right is a Bambusa Lako and a big ponytail.  The Lako should give it some shade in the afternoon.

886244819_P1070932KO.thumb.JPG.45e958ec319c7ef0c45a04afb0d2db45.JPG

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