Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Surf Guy

Palm soil

Recommended Posts

Surf Guy

I have been using cactus mix and perlite for all my palms. I have noticed that the palms grow well up to about a 5 gallon and the they begin to yellow and die. They usually break off at the soil line. Why does this happen? I think it may be due to bad soil conditions. What is a better soil mixture? I am not sure that this is the problem. Could it be from using tap water? I just want to fix it. I have put in too much time and effort to lose more than half my palms before I can plant them. Any advice would help. Thanks in advance. Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shon

Mike, if you are keeping everything in pots for now Jungle Music sells their soil. I forget how much but he puts a trash bag in a 5g bucket and fills it. You cannot get any better soil than that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
freakypalmguy

I use Sunshine mix #4. I buy it at L&M Fertilizer. Seems like high quality stuff. Here is some specs.

Mix # 4 Aggregate / LA 4

Sunshine Mix # 4 is recommended where high air capacity and fast drainage are needed: during winter months, with highly water or salt sensitive crops, or where frequent leaching is required.

Available Sizes

Available in 3.8 and 55 cu ft compressed bales, as well as 2.8 cu ft loose fill bags. Loose fill is also available in 60 cu ft from our Western and Central regions, and 70 cu ft from our Eastern region. Mix # 4 is available in our 110 cu ft Suntower bale in the Eastern region.

Ingredients

Formulated with Canadian Sphagnum peat moss, coarse grade perlite, gypsum, Dolomitic lime, and our long-lasting wetting agent.

Sunshine%20Mix%204%203.8%20cf.jpg

Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BS Man about Palms

Any Pictures? Sounds like overwatering when cold.  (take it from a container ranch expert :P  )  Maybe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Neofolis

I was having problems with a compost based mix and started to experiment.  What I am using now seems to be the most successful for my situation, out of the things I have tried so far and is completely soil free.

I use perlite 25%, coir (coco peat) 30%, composted bark chips 45%.  It is pretty much impossible to over water, because the mix doesn't hold much liquid and any excess just flows out of the bottom of the pot.  The large particle size of the bark chips and the addition of perlite ensures good oxygenation and helps to avoid compaction as the roots develop.  Whereas my sand/compost mix would need replacing after 6 months or so with plants that had viigorous root growth, this mix is still good after nearly a year with the same plants and I expect it to last considerably longer will slower growing species.  I was told that bark chips leech nitrogen depriving the roots of access to it, but this doesn't seem to have been an issue.  I am using a soluble fertilizer every two weeks and it may be that the constant topping up of nutrients helps to counteract the leeching effect.  Either way, I am more than happy with this mix now.  For plants that require more moisture, some rheophytes, etc., I just increase the coir percentage and decrease the composted bark chips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sonoranfans

(Surf Guy @ Jan. 16 2008,22:24)

QUOTE
I have been using cactus mix and perlite for all my palms. I have noticed that the palms grow well up to about a 5 gallon and the they begin to yellow and die. They usually break off at the soil line. Why does this happen? I think it may be due to bad soil conditions. What is a better soil mixture? I am not sure that this is the problem. Could it be from using tap water? I just want to fix it. I have put in too much time and effort to lose more than half my palms before I can plant them. Any advice would help. Thanks in advance. Mike

cactus mix is what I use(as a mulch) when planting in the ground, I would never use it in a pot.  I use supersoil potting mix or miraclegrow moisture control and have not killed any seedlings.  Obviously our climates are very different.  Overwatering is much less likely here (in a pot anyway).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul

(freakypalmguy @ Jan. 16 2008,20:12)

QUOTE
I use Sunshine mix #4. I buy it at L&M Fertilizer. Seems like high quality stuff. Here is some specs.

Mix # 4 Aggregate / LA 4

Sunshine Mix # 4 is recommended where high air capacity and fast drainage are needed: during winter months, with highly water or salt sensitive crops, or where frequent leaching is required.

Available Sizes

Available in 3.8 and 55 cu ft compressed bales, as well as 2.8 cu ft loose fill bags. Loose fill is also available in 60 cu ft from our Western and Central regions, and 70 cu ft from our Eastern region. Mix # 4 is available in our 110 cu ft Suntower bale in the Eastern region.

Ingredients

Formulated with Canadian Sphagnum peat moss, coarse grade perlite, gypsum, Dolomitic lime, and our long-lasting wetting agent.

Sunshine%20Mix%204%203.8%20cf.jpg

Matt

Hello Matt,

What do you pay for the larger size of this? Thanks.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kris

Dear Friends  :)

i prepare my soil and mostly its the same mix for palms,cycas & for cactus i add little more course river sand..

Since no ready mades soil mixes avaliable here in south india.

And here is a still of it !

1abd1195.jpg

love,

Kris  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

I was killing seedlings left & right with Miracle Gro potting mix then I found this superb mix at Lowe's. Here's the description:

Premium planting mix formulated for bigger and better blooms and vegetables with low pH and high phosporus

A complete and ready to use blend of composted aged forest products, Canadian sphagnum peat moss, perlite, vermiculite, charcoal, lime and fertilizer.

post-47-1200585355_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
palmislandRandy

I also vote for Jungle Growth, so far no problems! Sometimes I add more perlite or bark for drainage.:D

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cobra2326

I tried jungle growth, but since it's peat moss based, it's very difficult to keep uniformly wet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
www.dadluvsu.com

2 parts canadian peat : 2 parts coarse perlite : 1 part medium sand

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mike in kurtistown

Interesting how everyone has a soil that they swear by from years of experience, and yet the ingredients of these mixes differ considerably. Climate might explain part of it. Extraneous factors might also be involved.

For now, I am using a mix of Sunshine no. 4 and Supersoil, the latter for drainage in the local high-rainfall area, the former because the latter drains too quickly during our episodic dry periods and it has some water retention ability. Cycads get Supersoil and seem to thrive in it. Sometimes, I use the local brown volcanic, clayey soil amended with black cinder. Plants seem to be more stable, have less fungal/bacterial problems in the local mix, but don't grow as fast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MattyB

I agree with BS, sounds like an overwatering issue.  Supersoil's Palm & Cactus mix drains very well and I don't even add perlite once I get up to the 5 gallon size because it does so good.  It even gets better drainage as it ages because the fine particles break down and it opens up more.  I swear by it.

Shon's recomendation for Jungle Music's soil is great too.  I always get a bag when I'm there because you just can't beat it.  It's great for small seedlings because it's very open and chunky but has just enough peat in it to prevent drying out.

Sonoranfans,  interesting that you say you'd never use palm and cactus mix but you do use Supersoil Potting Mix.  The Supersoil potting mix is basically a finer version of the cactus mix with peat moss added to it.  It actually holds more water and I've found that things will rot in it more easily.  It's still not a bad choice but the cactus mix is better in my opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MattyB

Coincidentally I just went to Home Depot and they've discontinued the Supersoil Palm & Cactus mix! :angry:   They are replacing it with Miracle Grow's Palm, Cactus, and Citrus mix but it says "not for pots" and it has manure in it which is not good in pots cause it can lead to rot easily.  Maybe Sonoranfan was talking about the Miracle grow brand palm and cactus mix.  In that case I don't blame you for not using it.  So I'm going witht the Supersoil potting mix and mixing in a healthy amount of perlite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

I use Jungle Growth but now mix it (unless for a wet loving palm like A. wrightti). I mix 1/3 Jungle, 1/3 course perlite, 1/3 builders or sandbox sand. Buy the big bags of perlite a Home Depot.....(for use on lawns). The small bags are $$$

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gsn

(PiousPalms @ Jan. 17 2008,12:42)

QUOTE
2 parts canadian peat : 2 parts coarse perlite : 1 part medium sand

William,

Is the medium sand the same sand as sold in Lowes as playground or builders sand?

The reason I ask is I have heard to use #2 builders sand(I assume that is the particle size) but Lowes ,Home Depot,look at me like I have a horn sticking out of my forehead when I ask for #2 builders sand.

thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sonoranfans

(MattyB @ Jan. 17 2008,13:23)

QUOTE
I agree with BS, sounds like an overwatering issue.  Supersoil's Palm & Cactus mix drains very well and I don't even add perlite once I get up to the 5 gallon size because it does so good.  It even gets better drainage as it ages because the fine particles break down and it opens up more.  I swear by it.

Shon's recomendation for Jungle Music's soil is great too.  I always get a bag when I'm there because you just can't beat it.  It's great for small seedlings because it's very open and chunky but has just enough peat in it to prevent drying out.

Sonoranfans,  interesting that you say you'd never use palm and cactus mix but you do use Supersoil Potting Mix.  The Supersoil potting mix is basically a finer version of the cactus mix with peat moss added to it.  It actually holds more water and I've found that things will rot in it more easily.  It's still not a bad choice but the cactus mix is better in my opinion.

Matty, I have to water my seedlings in the summer up to 3x a day(15 mins each time w/timer) to keep them cool(<100F in the shadehouse which still gets ~3 hours of direct or partially filtered sun w/overhead netting.  I started out with cactus mix(3/5), a little sand(1/5) and a little clay(1/5).  Since then I have switched to miraclegro "moisture control", it drains better, seems to keep the uniform dampness with less frequent watering at the same time.  The supersoil I use for longterm(permanent) potted plants, mostly inside the house or mix it in small quantities with the miraclegrow "moisture control" with the larger seedlings.

I did all this with trial and error and a several seedling fatalities w/ the cactus mix formula.  I just couldnt get a forgiving dry cycle out of the cactus mix formula described above.  

Since I switched from the cactus mix formula, none have died in the last 8 months, and all look very healthy.  I actually saved 4 seedlings that were going bad in the cactus/sand/clay mix.

I currently have 1-5 gallon potted species

10 archontophoenix alexandre

4 archontophoenix maxima

3 archontophoenix purpurea

1 dypsis orange crush

1 dypsis baronii

3 roystonea Borinquena

2 serenoa repens

2 chamaerops cerifera

1 sabal minor "louisania"

The last 5 on the list and two of the purpurea were saved after starting to go bad, and I still have one palm, a purpurea in the cactus mix.  That purpurea looks quite sickly, not the way I received it, thats for sure.  I guess my problem is that I use water to cool(evaporatively) AND wet, so I need a soil that is forgiving to overwatering AND underwatering.  Perhaps the clay was a mistake and that was it.  The "moisture control" does drain very well when I water alot and yet stays damp when I dont.  It seems to drain better than the supersoil alone when I water alot.  Once the root systems of my seedlings are larger(5 gallon bound), I hope to change the soil to a lorger fraction supersoil, plus more vermiculite, and some sand perhaps.  WIth the small bare root seedlings that I bought, the moisture control seems to be more forgiving and gives me more uniform dampness in the soil.

It has been an adventure, keeping my shadehouse temps under 100F in 110F+ heat with solar heating effects as well.  Its not fun learning on the fly while watching things go bad due to heat or dry AND wet problems all at the same time.  Once my overhead canopy grows in better, things will be easier, but that may take a couple years.  I will say I must have done something right as my archontophoenix look very healthy(except the one in cactus/sand/clay), and I dont think thats too easy to do here in arizona heat/dry.  Note that I keel my smaller seedling pots in larger containers to keep their humidity up for the fronds.  that was also necessary apparently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
www.dadluvsu.com

Yeah, just regular old builders sand in the concrete department.

This is what I used...  

http://www.sakrete.com/products/product.as...NaturalPlaySand

If I would have known how addicted to this I would have become, I would have contacted the local quarry and purchased sand by the truckload :)  Dude, my house is built on sand...   How stupid do I feel for paying a buck a bag :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sonoranfans

(MattyB @ Jan. 17 2008,15:33)

QUOTE
Coincidentally I just went to Home Depot and they've discontinued the Supersoil Palm & Cactus mix! :angry:   They are replacing it with Miracle Grow's Palm, Cactus, and Citrus mix but it says "not for pots" and it has manure in it which is not good in pots cause it can lead to rot easily.  Maybe Sonoranfan was talking about the Miracle grow brand palm and cactus mix.  In that case I don't blame you for not using it.  So I'm going witht the Supersoil potting mix and mixing in a healthy amount of perlite.

I have come to the conclusion after reading some of the posts in this thread that my environment is very different than that nice socal or florida weather, I'm jealous guys.  Even 1/3 sand would kill my palms within a week.  The miraclegro I use is denoted "moisture control" and it seems to be forgiving of the dry cycle, but very light, solft in consistency.  In my experience, its very gentle on the tender seedling roots(I bought bare root seedlings), unlike the cactus soil.  I also noticed home depot discontinued the palm and cactus soil which is the preferred soil ammendment for "in ground palms" here, its works great on my in ground palms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MattyB

Tom, you're right it's all about the different climates.

William,  I got a bag of that Sakrete playsand once by mistake and it really clogged up the mix because it's so fine.  Sand is heavy too.  I now get the Sakrete sand for stucco or cement I forgot what the bag says.  On your link I think it's the multipurpose sand.  It's more coarse and allows for better drainage.  If I have a real desert palm that needs sand added to the mix then I use that stuff but I usually don't add any sand just perlite cause it's lighter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Surf Guy

(BS, Man about Palms @ Jan. 17 2008,01:23)

QUOTE
Any Pictures? Sounds like overwatering when cold.  (take it from a container ranch expert :P  )  Maybe.

Maybe my palms are having trouble drying out because I stopped watering once we had our first good rain in December. My mixture is  75% cactus mix and 25% perlite and I fertilize with vigoro every three months. I have heard that the cactus mix may be sterile and also try putting cow manure on the top of the soil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Surf Guy

I will try to post pix this weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sonoranfans

(MattyB @ Jan. 17 2008,18:33)

QUOTE
Tom, you're right it's all about the different climates.

William,  I got a bag of that Sakrete playsand once by mistake and it really clogged up the mix because it's so fine.  Sand is heavy too.  I now get the Sakrete sand for stucco or cement I forgot what the bag says.  On your link I think it's the multipurpose sand.  It's more coarse and allows for better drainage.  If I have a real desert palm that needs sand added to the mix then I use that stuff but I usually don't add any sand just perlite cause it's lighter.

Matty I read somewhere that its the lightness of pearlite that makes it drain so well.  The water is so much heavier in density than pearlite that the water passes throught the soil by gravity.  Sand sinks in water, but pearlite floats in it.  It makes sense that pearlite would have an added edge due to its low density.  The miraclegrow potting mix I use is loaded with pearlite as you can see in the pic I posted.  Sand is OK, but pearlite helps to counter the tendency of peat to hold the water with its low density.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Walter John

Hi Mike

Things came to mind immediatley, over watering as the boys have mentioned, cactus mix (meant for cactus not palms) and the species of palm themselves. What palm species are we talking about because some require more water, some less water and some hardly any water. The rain you mentioned was in December, was it full flushing rains or just shower rain. The list goes on I wish you good fortune and hope the loses are minimal to none.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palmetro

(krisachar @ Jan. 17 2008,10:41)

QUOTE
Dear Friends  :)

i prepare my soil and mostly its the same mix for palms,cycas & for cactus i add little more course river sand..

Since no ready mades soil mixes avaliable here in south india.

And here is a still of it !

1abd1195.jpg

love,

Kris  :)

Hey Kris! you didnt tell us what your mix is made of?? is that regular soil mixed with sand and fine wood chip???

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phil

Group,

The best potting soil is always the one that works best for you in your area.  Out here in California, different growers use all sorts of things.  And, there's no perfect best soil.  We've had very good luck with our soil. but other grower's soil might be just as good.  There's a few things I might comment on:

1.  What ever you use, remember that drainage is important.  You want good drainage, but not too good.  Cycad soils should be more quick draining.  Cactus and Succulent Mix is more for cycads and a bit quick for my palms.  You can work from it, but you may need to add a little bit of topsoil to slow down the drainage.

2.  Always check your pH in whatever soil you make.  Peat moss and shavings make it more acidic.  Dolomite is used for this acidity.

3.  As palms get bigger, they like a different soil than you might use for little seedlings.  I use a more open mix for new seedlings.  A more dense soil may be better for larger specimens.  Topsil (a bit) can accomplish this.  Nurseries tend not to use topsoil because of limitations with shipping, but that doesn't mean you have to have a "soil-less mix".

4.  Bigger sized sand I think is preferable to smaller.  Out here, #12 is the biggest you can easily find.  I really like this stuff, but it's more expensive.

5.  Learn the watering requirements of the soil you pick.

6.  I used to use Sunshine preparations for germination, but would think they are heavy on the peat for growing on.  But, if they work for you, use it.

7.  For your garden, especially when backfilling, always (ALWAYS) get the best soil you can.  You can't replace it later.

8.  Remember that soil compacts with time.  If you are doing deep backfill, remember the surface will sink.

The formulaes for both our palm and cycad soils are at our website:  www.junglemusic.net    Feel free to take a look at them.

Enough for now.

Phil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BS Man about Palms

(MattyB @ Jan. 17 2008,12:33)

QUOTE
Coincidentally I just went to Home Depot and they've discontinued the Supersoil Palm & Cactus mix! :angry:   They are replacing it with Miracle Grow's Palm, Cactus, and Citrus mix but it says "not for pots" and it has manure in it which is not good in pots cause it can lead to rot easily.  Maybe Sonoranfan was talking about the Miracle grow brand palm and cactus mix.  In that case I don't blame you for not using it.  So I'm going witht the Supersoil potting mix and mixing in a healthy amount of perlite.

Matty, check Lowes. I also noticed that Lowes has brought in some of the Keloggs Palm and Cactus mix, it seems to lighter yet than Supersoils!

Over all, I would say the "weight" of your soil should more of less be proportionate to your daily temps.  The heavier a mix is, it holds moisture and works fine if you have nice very warm days. As you have less heat in your area, your mix should be lighter. Almost without exception, the heavier mix plants I have around here I have to constantly watch for over watering and even more so in the winter.  A lot of that is I "might" be over 80F here for 2 months out of the year.  This works very well up to healthy 5 gal size plants and is even amplified in seedlings!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_Keith

OK, I confess ignorance here, but it would seem that not all palms are created equal, so neither should be the soil.    The soil should be considerate of the soils to which the palm is native, and ultimately as well, to the soils in which it will be planted.  

For instance, every palm I have is destined to go into the ground here, which is silty clay loam.  While I would never pot a plant in this soil, I do start to introduce native soils to the pot and wash it in as I get closer to planting date, to reduce the planting shock.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phil

Keith is right that not all palms are the same.  Ideally for desert palms, you'd use a more sandy mix.  For really tropical things, more organics.  But, from a nurseryman's point of few, this is difficult.  We're all looking for the right "universal soil" that can be used with everything.  Obviously, such a soil doesn't really exist.  Once in a while if I have extra sand available, I'll add it to my regular mix for Bismarckia, Hyphanae and Dypsis decaryii.  I think they like that.  But, in general, when we are potting up a few hundred plants of many species, changing the mix for each species doesn't work.  It's just too slow and labor intensive.  But, for an individual collector with a few palms, it might work fine to experiment to make the right soil for that plant from what he knows.  Also, remember that store bought soils are probably not going to be as good as what you can make yourself.   They tend to have a lot of perlite and peat mosss.  The reason for this is because these materials are light and women can lift the bags easily.  Who do you think is the major purchaser of bags of potting soil?  It's not the palm guys.

Phil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kris

Dear Christian  :)

Nice question,though i have said that combination many times in other post,i do so again for the benefit of new members !

let me explain in a small ratio : 4 bags washed course grade river sand : 1 Bag red soil : 1 bag cow dung manure(dried and natured) : 1 bag of dried neem leaves(mulch)

here the bag quantity will mean one cement bag size of 50 kg in weight ! and all the above is made ready during our spring time and usage will commence at the early summer.the medium is definetaly porous but if your perticular palm species hates organic manure then just avoide that ingrident in the above combination and in rare ocassion i even add the oganics from sea..i don't remember its techenical name..it is some kind of a fine blueish black course granules..

3096030f.jpg

And few years back i used organic fertz & pestecides(Bio-Friendly) here is a link to see the products..Hope this helps !

http://www.tstanes.com/

love,

Kris  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gbarce

Lately I have been using Charcoaled Rice hulls and Compost and just go by feel on the percentage of each.  But since I got my first few Cycads I have been adding Pumice to my mix.  

Much more pumice for the cycads- probably 70%  and only about 30% pumice if its for palms or seedlings.  

This makes for a very well draining mix.

OK with all my plants so far but I can't say that I have already settled on my recipe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
amazondk

Around here you don't find any of the packaged soil types you do in the States.  So, I just use what is available which is natural soil normally with a bit of sand rich in organic matter.  It seems to work alright here.  One down side is hauling the bags around.  For sure heat is no problem here.

dk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lyle-turner

(Phil @ Jan. 17 2008,21:45)

QUOTE
Group,

The best potting soil is always the one that works best for you in your area.  Out here in California, different growers use all sorts of things.  And, there's no perfect best soil.  We've had very good luck with our soil. but other grower's soil might be just as good.  There's a few things I might comment on:

1.  What ever you use, remember that drainage is important.  You want good drainage, but not too good.  Cycad soils should be more quick draining.  Cactus and Succulent Mix is more for cycads and a bit quick for my palms.  You can work from it, but you may need to add a little bit of topsoil to slow down the drainage.

2.  Always check your pH in whatever soil you make.  Peat moss and shavings make it more acidic.  Dolomite is used for this acidity.

3.  As palms get bigger, they like a different soil than you might use for little seedlings.  I use a more open mix for new seedlings.  A more dense soil may be better for larger specimens.  Topsil (a bit) can accomplish this.  Nurseries tend not to use topsoil because of limitations with shipping, but that doesn't mean you have to have a "soil-less mix".

4.  Bigger sized sand I think is preferable to smaller.  Out here, #12 is the biggest you can easily find.  I really like this stuff, but it's more expensive.

5.  Learn the watering requirements of the soil you pick.

6.  I used to use Sunshine preparations for germination, but would think they are heavy on the peat for growing on.  But, if they work for you, use it.

7.  For your garden, especially when backfilling, always (ALWAYS) get the best soil you can.  You can't replace it later.

8.  Remember that soil compacts with time.  If you are doing deep backfill, remember the surface will sink.

The formulaes for both our palm and cycad soils are at our website:  www.junglemusic.net    Feel free to take a look at them.

Enough for now.

Phil

Hi guys its been a while =) ive been flat out like a cucumber in a convent...

phil has some great points there, just remember each palm likes different things,depending on more than one factor. just had to put my 2c in cause its been so long =) BTW merry X-mas , and happy new yr every one

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SunnyFl

I'm still confused about what kind of potting mix to use and where on earth to get it.  Most of the Jungle Growth that's for sale is now the "moisture control" type and I don't think that's good for plants that need a well-drained soil.  And Home Depot, which used to carry a decent canadian peat, has now switched to - I think it's Miracle Gro - a different kind of canadian peat that seems more mushy.

As for potting mixes with ferts added - like Miracle Gro - is this a good idea?  Mightn't the added ferts be too much for new transplants?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_Keith

(SunnyFl @ Jan. 26 2008,23:17)

QUOTE
I'm still confused about what kind of potting mix to use and where on earth to get it.  Most of the Jungle Growth that's for sale is now the "moisture control" type and I don't think that's good for plants that need a well-drained soil.  And Home Depot, which used to carry a decent canadian peat, has now switched to - I think it's Miracle Gro - a different kind of canadian peat that seems more mushy.

As for potting mixes with ferts added - like Miracle Gro - is this a good idea?  Mightn't the added ferts be too much for new transplants?

I'll go out on a limb here for you, if for no other reason that someone can reply that I am wrong.  First, I am assuming that these plants are destined to go in the ground at some point.  If not disregard this.  Your soil is probably mostly sand.  Take any good potting mix and mix it 50/50 with sand.  Don't use beach sand, you need a contractor grade sand with rough edges from the local big box home improvement store.  Don't worry about ferts or moisture control, there won't be enough of it to matter.  This should drain just fine, and when those palms hit the ground it won't be a big shock.  That is my two cents.

If you are planting to sell ignore the above.  If you have to move the planters around a lot they will be heavy.   As I said, this is if you are going to eventually plant these palms on your property.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tropicalb

ask 10 growers what mix is "best", and you'll get 10 different answers...Phil is absolutely right when he says use the mix that works best for you.

and as another grower so eloquently put it:

"you gotta kill a lotta palms to become a good grower"......

it's all part of the process.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

The answer depends on the palm and the conditions.

For example, some palms love clay soil (Roytsonea, Acelleraphe, Archontophoenix) while others don't.  Dypsis decaryi, Ravenea glauca.

dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Surf Guy

(tropicalb @ Jan. 27 2008,02:04)

QUOTE
"you gotta kill a lotta palms to become a good grower"......

it's all part of the process.

So you mean I'm not the only one that has killed a lot of palms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...