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Tyrone

Southern Hemisphere Summer

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Daryl

I was lucky not to be living in Darwin when Tracy hit town. An old girlfriend of mine lost a few friends in that one, and had some real horror stories to tell. I moved back a couple of years after Tracy, and could not get over the devastation. The damage and destruction was total. Here is the road to my old highschool (seen at top of photo) after they had cleared up most of the mess on the roads

Daryl

post-42-1200572726_thumb.jpg

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ariscott

It will never get as bad as that, hopefully.... The houses are now built to code, well at least for category 3. Higher than that, who knows. But then, there are a lot more factors in play when there is a cyclone.

The thing about Tracy, she was moving too slowly and lingered for too long on top of Darwin. And of course, people was not prepared as it was Christmas and all. We went through Ingrid which was category 4 and since it was fast moving and smaller in size, it was ok. Helen was different again, she was only category 2, but then retained its size and intensity for a while (usually when cyclone hit the coast, it went down hill very quickly). So, it is a part of life in the top end. Just have to be prepared and hope for the best.

Regards, Ari :)

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amazondk

Here in my part of the southern hemisphere it continues to rain.  But, that is what it is supposed to do in a rain forest.  I think this year is more typical than a few we have had recently.  The talk about cylcones or hurricanes makes me glad that I don't have to put up with that anymore.  There is not really much that happens here except some pretty severe thunderstorms with very strong downdraft winds and maybe a few small toronados.  We do feel an earthquake from the Andes mountains or the caribbean every once and a while, but only the very tail end of the tremor.  Here is what has happened during the past day and night.  I like the rainy season, you don't have to water plants.  And, we really have very little bug problems as well, either in the dry or wet season.

Jan18MAOweather.jpg

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_Keith

(amazondk @ Jan. 18 2008,08:39)

QUOTE
And, we really have very little bug problems as well, either in the dry or wet season.

Funny quote from someone in the troprical rainforest.  Watching the new genre of tv shows you would swear that that for every 10th step in the jungle there is a poisonous bug or animal ready to take one out and that surely the average human life span in the jungle is about 15 minutes.

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amazondk

Keith,

The bug problems here are along the muddy water rivers.  On the floodplain of these rivers called the varzea the biting bugs can be a real problem, especially in the evening.  But, on black water rivers like the Negro there are virtually no mosquitos.  From time to time there are some annoying no see um type pests.  But, for the most part in our forests around here you can sleep out at night with no mosquito net.  We go camping using only a tarp to keep the rain off sleeping in hammocks tied between make shift posts and trees.  What you have to watch out for are wasps (called cabas) and ants.  It is really pretty hard to see a snake in the forest.  But, you probably walk right by some without seeing them.  The real danger in the jungle is getting lost.  You can walk five minutes and if you are not with someone who knows the area not find your way back from where you started.  There was a case of a three year old boy who got lost near his home some 780 kms from Manaus for twelve days in the forest.  He lives in the country along a river and wandered off into the forest and did not find his way back.  A hunter found him sitting under a tree singing a song some distance from his house by chance.  So, if a three year old can survive with very little except hunger for twelve days I guess you could say that the TV shows play it up a bit.  

My mother in law is from the same area, Jurua River,  which was a major producer of natural latex when she was growing up.  Her father died young and her mother raised the kids.  They lived in the country by a river surrounded by forest, virutally in the middle of nowhere.  They would go out every night at midnight with little kerosene lamps on their heads to collect latex dripping from the cuts in the rubber trees.  They had to leave home five minutes after midnight so that the evil spirits running around the forest at midnight would not get them.  She has lot of stories to tell of jungle lore.

I love to walk in the forest, but with a mateiro (local woodsman) and preferably not in the rain.  It is a real drag in the rain.  You get soaked, cold and the gloom of the forest is overwhelming.  

dk

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Tyrone

(amazondk @ Jan. 18 2008,08:39)

QUOTE
 We do feel an earthquake from the Andes mountains or the caribbean every once and a while, but only the very tail end of the tremor.

Don, That's only the Andes with a rumbly stomach.  :)

The Andes is still growing isn't it. I'd love to see them one day.

Talking about bugs. We went to Malaysia a couple of years ago walking in the rainforest etc and didn't see or feel one mosquitoe. There were not even cob webs around hard to reach parts of the verandah roof etc.

Anyway we came back to Perth in winter, and within five minutes of standing in my garden was bitten by mosquitoes. In Oz, you always check your shoes before putting any part of your body in there. You don't know what dangerous spider has crawled into it. The same with handling pots and potted plants. Never put your hand into an area you can not see, because the redback spiders may get you. So I think walking through the Amazon would be safer than living in a typical Oz suburban area. :)

regards

Tyrone

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ariscott

Mozzie is bad here in Darwin. Some nights are worse than others. It has something to do with the tides here and their breeding cycles.

We got heaps of snakes. I have seen green tree snakes, water phyton, and other phyton around the place. I haven't seen any poisonous ones yet (touch wood). We have guinea fowl because they make a lot of noise and they deter snakes, but the problem is you have to keep them alive until they are old enough to deter snakes. Yes, snake took some of them while young  :angry: .

Regards, Ari :)

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amazondk

Tyrone,

I believe that you do have more nasties there than we do around here.  There is one spider which is real dangerous in Brazil, but I have never seen one of them that I know of.  I do watch my step as well as possible to avoid snakes.  Although you don't see a lot of them, they are around.  And, some of them are pretty dangerous.  My wife ran around the forest barefoot all the time when she was little.  In fact she still does that when we are out in the country some times.  

Ari, do you eat the fowl before they get big enough?  Or, does something else happen.  I have heard the same thing here about them.

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philinsydney

Some areas in the Pilbara had record temps: Port Hedland and Onslow had 49c, as well as 5 days above 45c.

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Tyrone

(amazondk @ Jan. 19 2008,03:26)

QUOTE
Tyrone,

I believe that you do have more nasties there than we do around here.  There is one spider which is real dangerous in Brazil, but I have never seen one of them that I know of.  I do watch my step as well as possible to avoid snakes.  Although you don't see a lot of them, they are around.  And, some of them are pretty dangerous.  My wife ran around the forest barefoot all the time when she was little.  In fact she still does that when we are out in the country some times.  

Ari, do you eat the fowl before they get big enough?  Or, does something else happen.  I have heard the same thing here about them.

I saw a 8ft Dugite snake the other day at a palm nursery. This time of year it's hazardous to go walking through the bush without thick boots etc. The Dugite is deadly, but what you don't want to run into is a tiger snake. Those things are aggressive and fatal. Luckily my area is snake free, as it's been suburbia for a very long time. But if a snake got into my place it wouldn't want to leave. On a more positive side, I have heaps of Western Tree frogs living here, and they're very tame. I have a rock near my pond which will have 1 to 4 frogs at a time sitting on it, waiting for night time to come. The Western tree frog is also called the motorbike frog, because it makes a sound like a motorbike going through the gears. My frogs are quite safe here with no snakes.

Best regards

Tyrone

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Tyrone

(wrigphi @ Jan. 19 2008,07:39)

QUOTE
Some areas in the Pilbara had record temps: Port Hedland and Onslow had 49c, as well as 5 days above 45c.

Yes, that was last Friday. Not much at Onslow. I can't imagine how you would pass a 49C day up there, because there is NOTHING there except a pub and some asbestos houses. I spose you'd go to the pub and hope that the beer was cooler than 49C. There are a couple of Dictyosperma's, a few Bismarcks, a Cuban Royal and a few coconuts up there and some Sabal palmettos. If Onslow which is on the coast was 49C, I shudder to think what Nanutara roadhouse 80km inland was and even Millstream where L alfredii lives was like. It would have been more than 50C. I'll hazard a guess that it was 54C in there. I have no idea what that would have felt like. Probably like being locked in a parked car in the sun in 40C heat for 30 minutes. Dangerous heat.

regards

Tyrone

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amazondk

Tyrone,

We have tree frogs that will make you real sick or kill you if you touch them.  Fortunately they are very bright colored and easy to identify.  They found boa constrictor about 2 meters long across the street from us a few days ago.  I helped talk to the folks into sparing it's life and they took it to the universtiy property close by and let it go.  There a small area of untended woods there.  They are a pretty positive snake because they kill rats and other vermine.

Around here the water keeps coming down.  It is quite sunny right now at 12:32 PM.  The temperature is climbing over 30 C.  But, I think that it will cloud up and rain later.  There is so much moisture in the air and on the ground it just recycles as more rain.

Current Weather Conditions:

Manaus Aeroporto , Brazil

(SBMN) 03-09S 059-59W 84M

Conditions at

2008.01.19 1600 UTC

Wind from the ESE (120 degrees) at 2 MPH (2 KT)

Visibility greater than 7 mile(s)

Sky conditions partly cloudy

Weather Towering cumulus clouds observed

Temperature 84 F (29 C)

Dew Point 73 F (23 C)

Relative Humidity 70%

Pressure (altimeter) 29.91 in. Hg (1013 hPa)

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Daryl

(Tyrone @ Jan. 19 2008,22:03)

QUOTE

(wrigphi @ Jan. 19 2008,07:39)

QUOTE
Some areas in the Pilbara had record temps: Port Hedland and Onslow had 49c, as well as 5 days above 45c.

Yes, that was last Friday. Not much at Onslow. I can't imagine how you would pass a 49C day up there, because there is NOTHING there except a pub and some asbestos houses. I spose you'd go to the pub and hope that the beer was cooler than 49C. There are a couple of Dictyosperma's, a few Bismarcks, a Cuban Royal and a few coconuts up there and some Sabal palmettos. If Onslow which is on the coast was 49C, I shudder to think what Nanutara roadhouse 80km inland was and even Millstream where L alfredii lives was like. It would have been more than 50C. I'll hazard a guess that it was 54C in there. I have no idea what that would have felt like. Probably like being locked in a parked car in the sun in 40C heat for 30 minutes. Dangerous heat.

regards

Tyrone

Tyrone, I used to live in Onslow when I was a kid...

Don, I think we are in the same situation as you...it has started raining yet again...great for the garden though.

Daryl

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ariscott

OK, enough talking about rain  :P ... we are currently in the suppresion stage of MJO (or whatever they call it), we are waiting for the next monsoon trough to come back down. Hence it has been rather dry at the moment... We have been getting little convection storm, but nowhere near as much as monsoonal rain.

The garden still looks good though, it is still plenty of moisture under the mulch. I guess it is good for them to dry a little bit, otherwise things might get a bit mushy!! I remember some of my heliconias went rotten after 3 weeks of rain after cyclone Ingrid  :angry: .

Tyrone,

I have been to Karratha... It is very hot there this time of the year. Thank God, we didn't end up taking the job :) :). Although, some people have nice palm garden there...

Don,

The snake took some when they were chicks. I still have a few left and we are getting some more. Scott since then built a cage for them to go in at night, so the snake can't get them. Once they get big enough, they will make too much noise... they actually deter the snake from the property. Well... that's the plan.

I have heard good results from other people with property too.. It is either Guinea Fowl or Peacock. Since we can't seem to get any peacock, guinea fowl is good. We have government reserve next door, so I suspect the snakes all come from there. But, I would rather have government reserve than another neighbour.

BTW, talking about cyclone... ultimately, we would love to retire in Bali - up in the mountain. The best soil, tropical without the heat and NO CYCLONE... Until then, we just have to keep going. We still have 25-30 years to go.

Regards, Ari :)

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Tyrone

Daryl, Sorry if I insulted Onslow. I didn't know that you lived there at one stage.

My impressions of Onslow are probably negative because one summer we were camping at Ningaloo 80km south of Exmouth on the beach with beautiful blue seas, and cool seabreazes most days with everything too ourselves. Anyway I had a crazy idea to go and see what was at the other side of the Exmouth gulf, and that meant going to Onslow. We drove 500km through mid 40's heat, which was an amazing drive mind you. Nanutarra was 42C which doesn't sound that much after what we've had in Perth, but it felt horrendous at the time. Then we took the 80km rd towards the coast to Onslow. We stayed at the caravan park which was deserted, in a demountable chalet. The beach had signs saying "Do not swim here" because of submerged debris, probably from cyclones. Anyway the caravan park had a sign saying no refunds, and I paid for two nights. The chalet had a 15amp breaker that didn't allow you to cook with the airconditioner on without tripping out. All I wanted was a cold shower, but the cold water tap was already at around 40C. You don't need a hot water system up there in summer. Anyway that night we decided to head back to Carnarvon the next day and forget the other night we'd paid for. We had a look at the old Onslow ruins which was very interesting. Those early settlers had a hard life. We got back to the main Hwy at Nanutarra, and I thought, "the temp is quite pleasant here", then I went and had a look at the thermometer at the service station and it said 39C, which we thought was a laugh as we were becoming accustomed to the heat. It's a standing joke now with my wife and my English friend that we took with us. We talk about Onslow with a laugh, but we all agree that we're glad we went. If we went at another time of year it may have been much better. When we got to Carnarvon we went to a large palm nursery which was great. That's my impression of Onslow, but it won't be everyones I'm sure. Sorry if I was offensive Daryl. Your memories are probably much better and less harsh on the place.

Best regards

Tyrone

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Tyrone

Ari, I know what you mean about Karratha. You would have been able to grow all your really drought hardy heat loving tropicals, but your delicate rainforest stuff would have been almost impossible to keep in Karratha, unless you watered almost constantly. If you had a bore in Karratha you could water any day between 6pm to 9am as much as you want though. But I wouldn't try a palm garden without a serious canopy first in Karratha. The sun is way too strong. Darwin is much much better.

regards

Tyrone

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Daryl

(Tyrone @ Jan. 20 2008,11:05)

QUOTE
Daryl, Sorry if I insulted Onslow. I didn't know that you lived there at one stage.

My impressions of Onslow are probably negative because one summer we were camping at Ningaloo 80km south of Exmouth on the beach with beautiful blue seas, and cool seabreazes most days with everything too ourselves. Anyway I had a crazy idea to go and see what was at the other side of the Exmouth gulf, and that meant going to Onslow. We drove 500km through mid 40's heat, which was an amazing drive mind you. Nanutarra was 42C which doesn't sound that much after what we've had in Perth, but it felt horrendous at the time. Then we took the 80km rd towards the coast to Onslow. We stayed at the caravan park which was deserted, in a demountable chalet. The beach had signs saying "Do not swim here" because of submerged debris, probably from cyclones. Anyway the caravan park had a sign saying no refunds, and I paid for two nights. The chalet had a 15amp breaker that didn't allow you to cook with the airconditioner on without tripping out. All I wanted was a cold shower, but the cold water tap was already at around 40C. You don't need a hot water system up there in summer. Anyway that night we decided to head back to Carnarvon the next day and forget the other night we'd paid for. We had a look at the old Onslow ruins which was very interesting. Those early settlers had a hard life. We got back to the main Hwy at Nanutarra, and I thought, "the temp is quite pleasant here", then I went and had a look at the thermometer at the service station and it said 39C, which we thought was a laugh as we were becoming accustomed to the heat. It's a standing joke now with my wife and my English friend that we took with us. We talk about Onslow with a laugh, but we all agree that we're glad we went. If we went at another time of year it may have been much better. When we got to Carnarvon we went to a large palm nursery which was great. That's my impression of Onslow, but it won't be everyones I'm sure. Sorry if I was offensive Daryl. Your memories are probably much better and less harsh on the place.

Best regards

Tyrone

Hey mate, if I loved the place so much I'd still be living there... :D

I also lived in Port Hedland and a rarely mentioned place called Roebourne, another thriving metropolis.. :laugh:

The air there does get super-heated and my dad tells me stories of his time there, as he is a meteorologist and was doing all of the weather observations and ocean measurements back in the '60s.  I remember the heat, which wasn't so humid but was like a kiln blast.

The recent warm weather is how it used to be...he said throughout the 60s it was very hot, but in recent decades it hasn't been up to 'standard'. Looks like it is back to normal again!

Daryl

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Tyrone

Daryl, Your dad had an interesting job up there. Roebourne is as far north I've been on this side of the country. I've seen more of Queensland, and there's a reason for that. More palms.

That superheated air has travelled all the way from the humid east coast, lost all of it's moisture and heated to ridiculous levels. Even in winter the easterlies persist up there, though much cooler, but still no rain. You'd have to love that sort of thing to stay living up there. It's statistically the most often hit populated area for cyclones in all of Oz and the NW of Oz is the most cyclone active coastline anywhere. It hasn't had a cyclone this year so far, but last year the poor town got hit twice directly in short succession. The coastline must almost attract them.

regards

Tyrone

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Tyrone

Here we go again with this heat in Perth.

Forecast for Sunday    evening

Fine. A coastal sea breeze shifting fresh and gusty easterly tonight.

Precis:      Fine.                              

Forecast for Monday  

Fine. Fresh and gusty easterly winds easing before a mid afternoon coastal sea

breeze.

Precis:      Fine.                              

City:        Min 19     Max 33

Mandurah:    Min 19     Max 30

UV Index:    11 [Extreme] UV Alert from  9:40 to 17:20  

Fire Danger: Coastal Plain: HIGH    

            Hills:         HIGH    

Tuesday      Possible early thundery shower.        Min 19     Max 33

Wednesday    Fine.                                  Min 20     Max 35

Thursday     Fine. Hot.                             Min 22     Max 38

Friday       Hot. Partly cloudy.                    Min 23     Max 37

Saturday     Hot. Partly cloudy.                    Min 21     Max 38

Sunday       Hot. Partly cloudy.                    Min 23     Max 38

regards

Tyrone

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Tyrone

We've just had a couple of 38C days in a row. Average for Jan is now 19C min 33C max. 35C tomorrow then 4 days of 37C in a row. Thunder clouds have formed for the last couple of days but no rain. This morning some areas hit 100% humidity with 21C dewpoints, then as the day heats up humidity drops, dewpoints drop to around 14C at 35C. This morning was beautiful with warmth and humidity, the smell of Eucalyptus in the air, clouds in the sunrise.

Wish it would rain though. That's all gone to QLD. Hope everyone is alright in flooded, inundated QLD.

Best regards

Tyrone

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ariscott

Isn't it amazing how everywhere in Australia is raining, flooding even and nothing in WA? Well, except northern WA... We are not doing too badly here in NT, the next monsoon trough is expected to be the first week of February, so we are slashing, mowing and weed spraying this weekend. Once, it starts... bye bye sun!!

Regards, Ari :)

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Tyrone

How's it going Ari? :)

Yes it's a bit dry down here. A thunderstorm or too would be nice. The big thunder clouds have been threatening, but they just go inland. We had a min of 26C here last night, going for 36C but it will be hotter I think. If the monsoon trough fires up again in Feb maybe the tail end will influence our weather a bit and we get some nice fat tropical rain. Ahhhhhh rain. Haven't seen it since a couple of decent downpours in December.  :)

regards

Tyrone

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ariscott

Things are good, Tyrone. Trying to keep up with the weeds at the moment. Anyway, once we finish mulching... hopefully we can rest a bit.

You never know... we might send a cyclone or two down your way.. so you might get some rain.

Regards, Ari :)

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amazondk

Ari,

Is it mostly cloudy during your monsson?

Here are the current conditions here.  Pretty humid as you can see.

Current Weather Conditions:

Manaus Aeroporto , Brazil

(SBMN) 03-09S 059-59W 84M

Conditions at

2008.01.27 0000 UTC

Wind from the NE (050 degrees) at 7 MPH (6 KT)

Visibility greater than 7 mile(s)

Sky conditions mostly cloudy

Temperature 75 F (24 C)

Dew Point 75 F (24 C)

Relative Humidity 100%

Pressure (altimeter) 29.83 in. Hg (1010 hPa)

dk

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Tyrone

Don, you have some high humidity there, and a climate I can only dream about.

Ari, I'd welcome some of your monsoon season and a cyclone or two that comes ashore in some non populated area north of us and brings us rain . In the meantime, I'm so glad I have a bore with a 200litre per min output. Nothing has gone thirsty, and theyr'e all growing flatout with this heat. Even my Hedyscepe and Nikau palms are growing well in this heat, which I find quite a surprise.

Best regards

Tyrone

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ariscott

(amazondk @ Jan. 26 2008,19:44)

QUOTE
Ari,

Is it mostly cloudy during your monsson?

Hi Don,

When the monsoon trough is around, it is mostly cloudy. I think we would be lucky to see any sun at all during those 2-3 weeks period. But then... we have that stage between monsoon - which is very much like the build-up weather. Very hot and humid in the morning and occasional localised convection storm in the afternoon. Like today... it is so localised, I think we would be lucky to get any  :angry:

Tyrone,

I will send it your way, if you promise not to take all the rain down :) :). I know what you mean about bore water... Some new rural estate here is trying to sell new blocks with town water with inflated price. Yes, it is cheaper in a way, since they don't have to put a bore in which cost us around $15,000. Now they are bringing this new law that you can't put a bore in a block that has town water... I don't know how you can keep 5 acres block green with town water without paying a fortune!!!

Regards, Ari :)

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Tyrone

Ari, I suppose Darwin doesn't have a water crisis. If it did, it would not discourage bore water use. Maybe if Darwin's population was 1.7 million you would have a water crisis. May that never happen to you. The biggest problem over here is the infrastructure such as dams and major pipe work were all put down in the 1940's to 1970's and noone has upgraded them. In the meantime Perth's population has grown ten times. If everyone in Perth turned there sprinklers on, there'd be no mains pressure at all. Here on TV there are adverts saying don't turn your aircon on after work, or your dishwasher until late in the evening because the electricity grid can't handle the flow of current. It makes you wonder where the last 30 years of taxes have gone.

regards

Tyrone

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amazondk

Here in Manaus we have the largest supply of fresh water from rivers in the world.  And, there is a tremendous aquafir under the area.  But, with a population of around 1.7 million people at least 700,000 have no city water or sewage.  This is a major problem  We have a well and a septic tank as do most people in our area.  And, our house is right in town.  There is a major water distribution project under way now that should solve most of this problem.  Brazil has a lot of problems like this.  A very rich country with some real big infrastructure problems.  Sao Paulo has a pretty good water distribution network, but with a metro population of around 22 million it a prolonged dry spell hits water becomes a major problem and rationing is common.  If I remember right the city of Sao Paulo has a population not that different from Australia as a whole.  There is a special projects minister in the government which came up with a potential poject of making a giant aquaduct from the Amazon River to the semi arid northeastern Brazil lately.  He did not get a very positive reaction from the local politicians in our region.  Their point was, don't you think you should think about getting water to the people that live here before spending billions to send it elswhere.  

Our weather has firmed up a little.  Here is the current condition.  This is as about as dry as gets around here.

Current Weather Conditions:

Manaus Aeroporto , Brazil

(SBMN) 03-09S 059-59W 84M

Conditions at

2008.01.29 2000 UTC

Wind from the E (090 degrees) at 6 MPH (5 KT)

Visibility greater than 7 mile(s)

Sky conditions mostly cloudy

Temperature 91 F (33 C)

Heat index 97.5 F (36.4 C)

Dew Point 71 F (22 C)

Relative Humidity 52%

Pressure (altimeter) 29.74 in. Hg (1007 hPa)

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Tyrone

Ari, It's happening. Some of your wet hot weather is coming south. Yippeee :)

Here's the forecast.

Forecast for Wednesday

Fine. E/SE winds moderating before a mid afternoon coastal sea breeze. Fresh

E'ly winds returning tonight.

Precis:      Fine.                              

City:        Max 32

Mandurah:    Max 31

UV Index:    11 [Extreme] UV Alert from  9:30 to 17:20  

Fire Danger: Coastal Plain: VERY HIGH

            Hills:         VERY HIGH

Forecast for Thursday

Fine. Fresh and gusty easterly winds easing before a mid afternoon sea breeze.

Precis:      Fine.                              

City:        Min 18     Max 33

Mandurah:    Min 17    Max 31

Friday       Fine, hot.                             Min 19     Max 37

Saturday     Shower, thunderstorm later.            Min 21     Max 38

Sunday       Shower, thunderstorm.                  Min 23     Max 32

Monday       Shower or two.                         Min 22     Max 31

Tuesday      Possible shower, thunderstorm.         Min 21     Max 32

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ariscott

Tyrone,

You are probably getting it from the east... as we had no real action for a week now  :( . I had to turn the bore on today... Darwin is growing too, although not as rapidly as Perth (thank goodness for that, otherwise we won't be here). The infrastructure has not been upgraded either. We had 2 bad wet season before and they were talk about putting water restriction in town!! Crazy!!

Anyway, about the bores... there were talk about putting a meter on it!! Of course, rural people don't want to know it. People in town simply forget that we have to pay to get our bore in and it is not simply dig and find water. Sometimes, you had to dig 2-3 times to get water. We are lucky that we strike water the first time. Also, there is maintenance to be done to it over the years. Also, for some reason, they are afraid that we rural people would actually drain the aquafer... Hhmmm. It is the town people that leave the sprinkler on all night and when it rains!! Sorry, I am very passionate about this subject... I can keep going all day.

Don,

22 million people!!!! Wow, I thought Jakarta was bad. I think there are over 12 millions there. They have the same problem as Brazil. My dad lives 9km from centre of city and he has a bore (well.... less than 20m, so you can actually call it a well) and yes, septic tank. But the bore water is actually better than town water, so he is not worried.

Regards, Ari :)

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Tyrone

Ari, They were talking about bore meters here. But they'd have to employ heaps of bore meter readers, and the bore meters could be anywhere on the property, easily bypassed etc. It introduces more problems than it solves. If you're a big concern and are going to use lots of water, they make you get a water permit, which is a yearly fee, but still no meter.

The rain we're supposed to be getting is from Sat thru to Wed at least and is part of a tropical depression moving down the coast from the north. I can't wait for some interesting weather. All the max's will still be over 30, so some good growing temps etc for us down here.

Best regards

Tyrone

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aussiearoids

Tully , showers

fine elsewhere

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amazondk

Ari,

I think that 22 million is too many people as well.  I am sure there are some similarities between Sao Paulo and Jakarta.  But, there are probably just as many differences.  Sao Paulo is sort of like a South American New York City.  The coastal part of the state is truly beautiful.  The city is less than 100 kms from the ocean and the road descends quickly from 1000 meters above sea level over a pass that is maybe 20 kms from the ocean.  There are major expressways linking the city to the coast.  The problem is on holidays and weekends you may spend as much time in traffic as you do at the beach.  Brazil and Indonesia have roughly the same population but I think the most of the similarities stop about there. Whereas Indonesia has a complex ethnic and cultural mix Brazil is more like Australia with one language and a common culture, in spite of some regional differences.  Indonesia is a place I have always wanted to visit.  But, who knows if I will ever make it.  

dk

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ariscott

Don,

On the other hand, I would love to visit South America one day. Maybe... when the kids are old enough. BTW, should post photo of your little one. My friend just had a baby, and I am getting clucky - but I kept on telling myself that we can't AFFORD another one :) :).

Regards, Ari :)

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Daryl

Rain continues here. We got another 200mm (8 inches) over the last day. The official weather station closest to me received 100mm (4 inches) in one hour this afternoon. We really have had enough rain for a while...sun please come back out!

We are still on the severest water restrictions and the water is now 1.5 metres (5 feet) above the spillway of our main dam. At least I don't have to worry about watering the garden...LOL!

Daryl

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Tyrone

(Daryl @ Feb. 03 2008,08:10)

QUOTE
Rain continues here. We got another 200mm (8 inches) over the last day. The official weather station closest to me received 100mm (4 inches) in one hour this afternoon. We really have had enough rain for a while...sun please come back out!

We are still on the severest water restrictions and the water is now 1.5 metres (5 feet) above the spillway of our main dam. At least I don't have to worry about watering the garden...LOL!

Daryl

That's amazing Daryl, and especially that you're still on water restrictions. 1.5m above the spillway is a good thing. You can send that 1.5m to us over here. Still no rain, but there is terrific lightening out to the east of me tonight. We're supposedly going to have rain from tomorrow until Saturday. We'll see.

regards

Tyrone

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Daryl

Tyrone, you can have it all...

Apparently the prediction is that the dam level will rise by up to another 3 metres overnight due to the runoff that is still making it's way into the dam. That would put the water 4.5 metres (15 ft) over the spillway..would be spectacular to watch!

They are forecasting some flooding downstream overnight and tomorrow. Hopefully the rain will stop, but it is forecast for the next 7 days...don't you love la nina!

Daryl

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Walter John

Just back from a dryish canary island date palm Melbourne for a couple of days and the rains here look set in still, even heavier. Who needs rain gauges ? Very muggy this morning

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ariscott

Phase 4 of the MJO!!! Woohooo!!! Can't wait to get rid of the hit and miss convection rain, and get the real monsoonal rain.... My garden miss the big rain!!!

Regards, Ari :)

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Tyrone

Everyone, IT'S RAINING HERE. Yaaaaeeeeeeeee. I woke up to it this morning. Nothing like you guys and the rain, but we've had 7mm in two hours and I'm stoked. Everything is wet and fresh. Yes, life is sweet.   :)

regards

Tyrone

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