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Coconut Growing Farthest From Equator

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TommoThePalmGrower

I am happy to look at historical averages but really these graphs are 'historic'. Winter low averages of 8 degrees in Sydney..... I wish. I live near the coast and last 2 winters here were many morning temps of 4 degrees. I think we can all agree the world is a changing place and changing temperatures are a reality that we need to acknowledge. In saying all this I look at temperatures day to day in winter here in Sydney. My tough plants stay out in cold weather but if i know temps will be below 5 C or 42F the so called 'handle small periods of frost' plants will come inside. I don't get frost in my garden but the winter wind off the snowy's does burn the leaves on many of my more northern born friends.

I have 3 nucifera and a number of other tropicals (c.renda) that grow beautifully through our summer outside in pots but they come in for winter with LED overhead lights and throw spears under these conditions.

My big plan is to plant one nucifera out here in Sydney and nurture it but i don't really think it will be ok in the long term. So it looks like they will stay potted and come inside each winter until they grow though my lounge room roof.... :) 

So in summary, all of our temperature averages across the world cannot be predicted. So have a go in trying to plant your favourites in your location, look after them and see how you go but be realistic in the expected outcomes and don't plant tropicals that members on this site have sworn won't survive in certain zones.

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James West
On 20 February 2018 7:36:22 am, Nick1985 said:

Hi Tommo

Looks like you've got some good stuff there. I think you're right about Sydney coastal lows - they can drop below Observatory Hill's (OH) readings. If you look at our past winter you'll see that OH recorded lows were a couple of degrees above Port Macquarie and about the same as Coffs Harbour. Definitely a heat island effect going on there. So the Botanical Gardens are in a good position - better than they were when they were first established before the heat island phenomenon kicked in. When the Pommies first came here they brought numerous tropicals from Rio de Janeiro, some thrived and some didn't. The founding of Sydney is really a modern day Noah's Ark story. So I see the gardens as a major asset to this city, and something that should be be supported. There's nothing wrong with a bit of experimentation.

I delivered some (lawn) turf to a property in Dural about 25 years ago. The bloke was selling Macadamia nuts out the front of his Hacienda. He had been told they wouldn't grow south of Coffs Harbour but - voila! Who knows what's possible?

Keep up the good work

James West

 

 

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kingdom67
11 hours ago, James West said:

 

Nuhun ship, this is a very good description for sydney. I believe that every plant can adapt to Sydney.

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AnTonY
On 2/26/2018, 7:37:33, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Average sea water temps in Galveston and the upper Texas Coast in Jan. are around 52F to 53F, and sometimes drop down to 46F to 48F with the passage of really bad Arctic fronts, so I don't know where you got these statistics from.  Even as far south as South Padre Island, the Jan. sea water temps average around 58F, which is too cold for tropical corals to grow on the jetties there.  Even the more cold hardy tropical corals, like some of the start corals, need a minimum sea water temp of at least 62F in the middle of winter.

John

Here's the full data, though I see quite some weird incongruities (i.e. Sabine Pass, Wilmington NC vs points farther south, etc).
https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/dsdt/cwtg/all_meanT.html

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pin38
On 4/12/2018, 1:03:56, AnTonY said:

Here's the full data, though I see quite some weird incongruities (i.e. Sabine Pass, Wilmington NC vs points farther south, etc).
https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/dsdt/cwtg/all_meanT.html

Assuming that's not a data entry error, I'm guessing that's due to Wilmington being on a part of NC that extends out toward the Gulf Stream and currents coming off of it.  Especially if they're taking temps near Bald Head Island. I could see that making the winter water warmer than more recessed parts of the coastline like Savannah or Myrtle Beach.

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AnTonY

@pin38 the Gulf Stream certainly can contribute, along with the station's water depth. But, there may be some data errors too, like with Sabine Pass.

 

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kutsalangemon

I think northernmost coconut belongs to Stelios lives in South part of Cyprus.

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Stelios

Hi Mehmet!

Thanks for the kind words but I believe Malaga in Spain has a similar size palm with mine and is more north than here. Of course this is a palm that could never grow completely without some winter protection at least for the first years and planted in the best location here in Paphos so I don't know if it this counts for the northernmost coconut. But is good to see people trying and sometimes they have some success. I hope in the future to see somebody trying in a good microclimate in Turkey.

Best regards

Stelios

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GottmitAlex
51 minutes ago, Stelios said:

Hi Mehmet!

Thanks for the kind words but I believe Malaga in Spain has a similar size palm with mine and is more north than here. Of course this is a palm that could never grow completely without some winter protection at least for the first years and planted in the best location here in Paphos so I don't know if it this counts for the northernmost coconut. But is good to see people trying and sometimes they have some success. I hope in the future to see somebody trying in a good microclimate in Turkey.

Best regards

Stelios

Well, I image the op's topic is about a gtpund- planted  coco. Not a coco in a pot. Folks in Canada have coconuts un pots. And on the other side of the coin I read that somewhere in England they have coconuts planted in the ground, but beneath greenhouses. In fact, there is a famous one somewhere.  Even northern US, forget the town had a humongous one, and got too big for its britches, overwhelmed the glass ceiling and they got rid rid of it. So I guess it's all "relative"....

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Nick1985
5 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

Well, I image the op's topic is about a gtpund- planted  coco. Not a coco in a pot. Folks in Canada have coconuts un pots. And on the other side of the coin I read that somewhere in England they have coconuts planted in the ground, but beneath greenhouses. In fact, there is a famous one somewhere.  Even northern US, forget the town had a humongous one, and got too big for its britches, overwhelmed the glass ceiling and they got rid rid of it. So I guess it's all "relative"....

That’s ridiculous to compare. If you have a Plant growing outside in a pot in a climate where it’s almost good enough to plant in the ground is completely different to a greenhouse in sub arctic conditions. I’ve got a plant in a lot which has been going well, Sydney where I live is pushing the limits but with some extra care should make it. This thread is about pushing the limits of growing a coconut plant outside with no greenhouse etc. 

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James West

The Malay Dwarf planted in the Sydney gardens is still kicking. The summer lasted until Anzac day (25th of April). However, no rain in April until Anzac day.

The palm has not been watered at all, which is very stupid of the Gardens management. The two latest fronds are healthy and green, but smaller than the existing ones on the tree. It will be very interesting to see how it handles the Sydney winter. I will report on it, but in the meantime, I'd say the Newport Beach LA and La Quinta specimens in California hold the record for (provable) coconuts palms successfully growing farthest from the equator.

I've heard stories about coconuts growing in Port Elizabeth, South Africa - which is the same distance from the equator as Sydney. But I've never seen any photos to prove that it's true. The hunt continues. . . 

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GottmitAlex
51 minutes ago, James West said:

The Malay Dwarf planted in the Sydney gardens is still kicking. The summer lasted until Anzac day (25th of April). However, no rain in April until Anzac day.

The palm has not been watered at all, which is very stupid of the Gardens management. The two latest fronds are healthy and green, but smaller than the existing ones on the tree. It will be very interesting to see how it handles the Sydney winter. I will report on it, but in the meantime, I'd say the Newport Beach LA and La Quinta specimens in California hold the record for (provable) coconuts palms successfully growing farthest from the equator.

I've heard stories about coconuts growing in Port Elizabeth, South Africa - which is the same distance from the equator as Sydney. But I've never seen any photos to prove that it's true. The hunt continues. . . 

Fyi: Newport coco kicked the proverbial bucket several years ago.....

The Corona, CA coconut's ambiance/circumstance (unprotected)  is what folks who are coco nucifera aficionados in marginal climates should attempt to mimic.

It's a Cali 9B zone, fer crying out loud!

Edited by GottmitAlex

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Eukalyptus

Greenhouse in the roots and water evacuation; Is this idea right for you?

 

c v.jpg

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kutsalangemon

BTW there is no coconut tree in Turkey. There might be chance to try in Alanya or Mersin or Adana coast side. These coastal places never experience frost and most of tropical plants grow in these areas.

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Eukalyptus
2 hours ago, kutsalangemon said:

BTW there is no coconut tree in Turkey. There might be chance to try in Alanya or Mersin or Adana coast side. These coastal places never experience frost and most of tropical plants grow in these areas.

No no. These regions are very cold in winter; and this seems to be impossible. Maybe except for greenhouse plants; orange, lemon and some subtropical banana and the like...

However, mediterranean bananas support some minority hard species; I am sorry, but still, it is not as qualified as the tropical banana which is delicious.

In addition, greenhouse farming is unhealthy.

Edited by Eukalyptus

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Eukalyptus

It is an estimated project, the detailed picture of the picture I share above. For coconuts, underground, hidden greenhouse flower pots. In mediterranean conditions, for winter rains.  

c v.jpg

Edited by Eukalyptus
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GottmitAlex
33 minutes ago, Eukalyptus said:

It is an estimated project, the detailed picture of the picture I share above. For coconuts, underground, hidden greenhouse flower pots. In mediterranean conditions, for winter rains.  

c v.jpg

Oh for greenhouses. Got it. The previous drawing (before the edit) appeared,  on the outset, to be designed for outdoor growing. 

In my case, I opted not to go the black poly mesh/insulation on soil level. Not because it won't increase the heat. It will. But on rainy/cool days it will keep the soil wet and cool.  Not good good for cocos in our Mediterranean climate. 

I am of course, referring to an outdoor scenario.

Edited by GottmitAlex

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Nick1985

Palms in Sydney mid winter 2018. Not going great but still there 08C7986E-1B80-4DCA-9043-1814E2264E61.thu

4014035B-78AB-4A48-A516-B26CA4067197.jpeg

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kutsalangemon

Still in Mediterranean area we cant plant coconut so where is this famous global warming? Is there any coconut growing Mediterranean coast of North Africa or is it still to cold for winter?

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Nick1985
22 minutes ago, kutsalangemon said:

Still in Mediterranean area we cant plant coconut so where is this famous global warming? Is there any coconut growing Mediterranean coast of North Africa or is it still to cold for winter?

Pretty sure one is in Malaga and Cyprus. Not sure where I read it but would need some extra care for the cool winters 

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James West
On 14/07/2018, 8:45:11, Nick1985 said:

Palms in Sydney mid winter 2018. Not going great but still there 

 

H i Nick. Thanks for that. I was going to check it out this week. Shame they didn't plant those palms against a wall like the Californian ones at Newport Beach, La Quinta and Corona. 

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James West
On 14/07/2018, 9:21:13, kutsalangemon said:

Still in Mediterranean area we cant plant coconut so where is this famous global warming? Is there any coconut growing Mediterranean coast of North Africa or is it still to cold for winter?

Limassol and Alexandria are possibilities.

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Anthony_B
On 4/12/2018, 3:03:56, AnTonY said:

Here's the full data, though I see quite some weird incongruities (i.e. Sabine Pass, Wilmington NC vs points farther south, etc).
https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/dsdt/cwtg/all_meanT.html

It isn't an incongruity.  I live in Wilmington, NC.  The Gulf Stream kicks out to the tip of Hatteras.  Charleston sucks in deeply across the cost.  I like to say right where I am at is a little protective high pressure bubble - it is remarkable how you can see "weather" swirl around all around you, but we are often under this little protective dome.  Anyway, we stick out into the Gulf Stream, whereas Charleston sucks in too far.

 

I have been in the water here in February chasing dolphins.  You can literally walk right into it.  It must be in the mid-60's toward the end of February.  It is shocking how...not cold it is.  I'm not saying you want to be in it for a prolonged period of time, but running in up to your waist is almost sort of comfortable.  You couldn't have a Polar Plunge in Wilmington.  The ocean is just too warm all year long.

 

Here is a good visual:

b7b8fa92bca1e07066117946ac699dc18bf185e6

See how southern NC kicks out into the Gulf Stream, and the further south you go, the more it sucks in away from it?  But, then you go too far north to Hatteras and cold water starts intruding.  Wilmington is in this little pocket where it's too far south for the cold water intrusion (which is why Hatteras/Duck shows colder), but far north enough that the coastline doesn't kick in (which is why Charleston is colder).  Location, location, location!

 

 

Edited by Anthony_B

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Walt

I have a navy buddy who lives in Wilmington, N.C. near Silver Lake.  I haven't seen him in person since I got out of the navy in July of 1971, however I've seen my buddy on the Carolina Beach cam while we were talking on our cell phones. 

My buddy has been going to Carolina Beach (since he retired about 10 years ago) many times each week once the daytime highs stay above 65 degrees. He flies three flags off long poles from his SUV (on the beach), that's how I find him on the camera. When the camera zooms in I can see my buddy fairly good.

But to my point, I've been monitoring the Carolina Beach air and water temperatures for years at the surfchex website. Last winter I was watching the beach camera at night, and several people went into the water. I told my buddy about it and he said it was probably Yankee tourists, as they sometimes go into the water. They weren't swimming, just fooling around. The water temperature was about 58 degrees. It's now 84 degrees.

 http://surfchex.com/

While the ocean water may be warmer in Wilmington (Gulf Stream closer) and the water colder in Charleston, S.C., Charleston has a warmer climate overall. I was stationed in Charleston, and I also would drive up to Wilmington on occasion. 

As for Hatteras and the Outer Banks, I used to camp out there back in 1968 (summer) when I was stationed in Norfolk, Va., but I first started going to the Outer Banks in 1964. I've witnessed the water temperature make a 20 degree swing (up or down) depending how close the Gulf Stream's route fluctuated. I was told this at a US Coast Guard Station there, as them monitored the weather. When my ship would depart Charleston and steam east into the ocean (in February), the air temperature would rise 15-20 degrees once we got near the Gulf Stream.

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bubba

I have to take exception with that diagram. From it, you would deduce that the Gulf Stream was 50 miles East of the Palm Beaches. Not true. Dipped my toes in it this afternoon about 1 mile out the Palm Beach Inlet. The furthest eastern point in the state of Florida is the north point of the Palm Beach Inlet.

If the waters and temperatures are so warm in Hatteras, why are you not growing coconuts like Bermuda? How far out is the GS from you in Hatteras? Why do all the folks fishing for Sailfish, etc come here in the winter because you hit the GS in 2 miles. I did some fishing in NC and you had to go 50 miles before you hit the Stream. What am I missing?

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IHB1979

I think the edges of the stream vary a little bit day to day. When I went deep sea fishing in Hatteras, NC it was about 28 miles from shore. NOAA has the daily location in its marine forecast, if available in your area. For instance, today here it is for my area:

The approximate location of the west wall of the Gulf Stream based on the Real Time Ocean Forecast System as of Monday July 16th.

39 nautical miles east of Ponce Inlet.
28 nautical miles east of Port Canaveral.
23 nautical miles east of Sebastian Inlet.
15 nautical miles east of Fort Pierce Inlet.
8 nautical miles east of Saint Lucie Inlet.

 

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Nick1985

If the stream varies a lot then what’s the point? Plain and simple it’s too cold anywhere in NC for coconuts. The extreme cold you get in winter it’s impossible. 

We have had the coldest night in nearly 20 years (4.7c) and I’m worried the plants migut survive here in Sydney!

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IHB1979
40 minutes ago, Nick1985 said:

If the stream varies a lot then what’s the point? Plain and simple it’s too cold anywhere in NC for coconuts. The extreme cold you get in winter it’s impossible. 

We have had the coldest night in nearly 20 years (4.7c) and I’m worried the plants migut survive here in Sydney!

I agree, Nick. The stream modifies OBX in the winter, but it's no match for the polar fronts that race down from Canada.

A dry, short duration 40F shouldn't be an issue if temps rebound quickly. Might have issues with a prolonged wet 40F though. 

 

 

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bubba

Got to add a point. At the furthest eastern point in the state of Florida, the Stream is the closest point in the state year round (northern point of the Palm Beach Inlet). Our water temperature is warmer than Key West, Miami Beach, and numerous additional points to the south of PB in the winter.

 For example, Key West is shown to average 69°F during the month of January. PB averages around 72 F  during the same month in the winter. On the Gulf side, Naples  average is 66°F in January. I know of no other Gulf side winter water  temperatures.  There is no question that the location of the Stream in PB creates a microclimate  and any variance in the Stream at this latitude does make a climatic difference.

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AnTonY

@Anthony_B

Fair enough for NC,  but I did reference other locations as well. Especially Sabine Pass, TX, which is just plain flat out wrong.

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Anthony_B
On 7/15/2018, 11:43:25, bubba said:

If the waters and temperatures are so warm in Hatteras, why are you not growing coconuts like Bermuda? How far out is the GS from you in Hatteras? Why do all the folks fishing for Sailfish, etc come here in the winter because you hit the GS in 2 miles. I did some fishing in NC and you had to go 50 miles before you hit the Stream. What am I missing?

Why would you think Hatteras had a warm climate?  North Carolina is on the East Coast.  Weather patterns come from the West Coast.  We frequently get bombarded by Canadian air masses that move down unencumbered when the jet stream dips unusually low in the dead of the winter.  Last January was the coldest in 100 years, here.  We had a week from absolute Hell.  In one week, I recorded a low of 8 and 9 degrees.  This is typically a strong 8A/weak 8B zone.  It was so bad, even some mature palmetto were killed.  It about wiped out every Washingtonia established here, and many were very old.

 

Yet, the ocean still stayed in 60+ degrees.

 

This isn't England, where the Gulf Stream is to the west.  It doesn't afford us the kind of protection if affords Europe or Bermuda because it's behind our air masses, not in front.  All the ocean is to us is a radiator.  It isn't a shield.  We don't get the protection like they do on the West Coast because of that fact.

 

I am 5 hours south of Hatteras.  The Gulf Stream is tenuous in Hatteras.  It isn't down here.

Edited by Anthony_B

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Walt
On 7/15/2018, 7:48:37, Walt said:

I have a navy buddy who lives in Wilmington, N.C. near Silver Lake.  I haven't seen him in person since I got out of the navy in July of 1971, however I've seen my buddy on the Carolina Beach cam while we were talking on our cell phones. 

My buddy has been going to Carolina Beach (since he retired about 10 years ago) many times each week once the daytime highs stay above 65 degrees. He flies three flags off long poles from his SUV (on the beach), that's how I find him on the camera. When the camera zooms in I can see my buddy fairly good.

But to my point, I've been monitoring the Carolina Beach air and water temperatures for years at the surfchex website. Last winter I was watching the beach camera at night, and several people went into the water. I told my buddy about it and he said it was probably Yankee tourists, as they sometimes go into the water. They weren't swimming, just fooling around. The water temperature was about 58 degrees. It's now 84 degrees.

 http://surfchex.com/

While the ocean water may be warmer in Wilmington (Gulf Stream closer) and the water colder in Charleston, S.C., Charleston has a warmer climate overall. I was stationed in Charleston, and I also would drive up to Wilmington on occasion. 

As for Hatteras and the Outer Banks, I used to camp out there back in 1968 (summer) when I was stationed in Norfolk, Va., but I first started going to the Outer Banks in 1964. I've witnessed the water temperature make a 20 degree swing (up or down) depending how close the Gulf Stream's route fluctuated. I was told this at a US Coast Guard Station there, as them monitored the weather. When my ship would depart Charleston and steam east into the ocean (in February), the air temperature would rise 15-20 degrees once we got near the Gulf Stream.

To add to my earlier post. When the Gulf Stream does swing close to the eastern most Outer Banks, the water clarity also increases, along with the water temperatures. I only experienced this once, but it was quite discernible. The water had more of an aqua color, rather than a darker grayish-green color. I went fishing in the Gulf Stream out of Oregon Inlet (Outer Banks) for blue marlin and dolphin fish (mahi mahi) in July of 1967. You know your in the Gulf Stream from the beautiful blue water and Sargasso seaweed in the water.

Below is two temperature graphics I took from my computer on December 29, 2011 at 6:12 a.m. As you can see, Hatteras was recording 45 degrees, while inland temperatures were far colder. Hatteras was warmer than Charleston, S.C. (34 degrees) and Wilmington, N.C. (31 degrees). Surely, a testament that the Gulf Stream must have been swinging closer to Hatteras that morning.

The second temperature graphic shows the Florida peninsula. Note St. Pete, Florida (I think at Albert Whitted Airport) 56 degrees compared to S.E. Florida. The St. Pete station isn't an anomaly. This site almost invariably runs warmer than all of central Florida and oft times as warm, sometimes warmer (nighttime only) that s.e. Florida. It must be because of all the heat absorbing concrete at the airport, plus being right on the Gulf.

 

Hattress 45 degrees.jpg

Temperature plots.jpg

Gulf Stream off Hatteras.png

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bubba

Good points made by all. The use of So. Fl. and Gulf Stream v. NC makes no sense and please accept ore tenus Motion to Strike. However, two (2) mile location of Gulf Stream in Winter to PB (based upon furthest easterly point of Florida) does have micro-climate implications.

Walt's temperatures are taken from accepted regional locations, which are usually airports (St.Pete/Albert Whitted Airport/ WPB/PBIA). Because of recently available information from weather stations located in PB near ocean, low temperatures during Winter have been documented to be 5-7 degrees warmer than PBIA. Add 7F to PBIA on night of map (51F plus 7F=58F) and you can see micro-climate implications. 

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Anthony_B
2 hours ago, bubba said:

Good points made by all. The use of So. Fl. and Gulf Stream v. NC makes no sense and please accept ore tenus Motion to Strike. However, two (2) mile location of Gulf Stream in Winter to PB (based upon furthest easterly point of Florida) does have micro-climate implications.

Walt's temperatures are taken from accepted regional locations, which are usually airports (St.Pete/Albert Whitted Airport/ WPB/PBIA). Because of recently available information from weather stations located in PB near ocean, low temperatures during Winter have been documented to be 5-7 degrees warmer than PBIA. Add 7F to PBIA on night of map (51F plus 7F=58F) and you can see micro-climate implications. 

From the way you're writing, you still seem to be conflating air temperature with water temperature.  The Gulf Stream has far less impact on air temperature on the East Coast.  The Atlantic Ocean is only a radiator because the polar jet comes in from the west.  It doesn't offer very much protection for air temperatures when the polar jet is coming in from the northwest.

 

The Atlantic Ocean is far less protective to the East Coast than the Pacific Ocean is to the West Coast because the weather comes in from the west on the West Coast.  This means the Pacific Ocean is a radiator and a shield, whereas the Atlantic Ocean is only a radiator.  A shield is stronger than a radiator.

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bubba

I must take exception with your statement above as it relates to the Gulf Stream effect in PB. Year-round 85F water two (2) miles off the coast at our latitude (circa 26) has a major effect on the relatively limited number of cold fronts that actually make it to and through our region.

Couple the radiator with Gulf of Mexico and Lake Okeechobee that a cold front has to travel over to arrive and you may not have the Rockies but you have some powerful protection. You have to actually see with your own eyes the mountain on the Stream when a front makes it through to understand the bounce-back effect on rare polar incursions. Brownsville, Tx. is further South (circa 25) and we are in the tropics.

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Attalea Funifera
On 7/14/2018 at 1:45 PM, Nick1985 said:

Palms in Sydney mid winter 2018. Not going great but still there 08C7986E-1B80-4DCA-9043-1814E2264E61.thu

4014035B-78AB-4A48-A516-B26CA4067197.jpeg

www.rekorgelisim.com/yorum-videolari
I think I know a way to save them. And this method will be the only elixir of coconut trees, which has been reconciled with the mediterranean conditions. ^ REKOR GELiŞiM ^ He's a miracle. It is a magnificent soil conditioner that gives life to the drying trees, protects the risk of frost and spectacular the quality of the fruit.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2RAq_uoCNjA

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tacobender

In Lake Chapala area in Mexico. Latitude 20  high altitude with some occasional frost. Lots of chilly weather for a few months. Coconuts are fairly healthy and fruiting all around. 

Would the tropical sun/uv overcome the effects of cool temps? Daylight hours?

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RedRabbit
On 7/27/2018 at 8:54 PM, Walt said:

The second temperature graphic shows the Florida peninsula. Note St. Pete, Florida (I think at Albert Whitted Airport) 56 degrees compared to S.E. Florida. The St. Pete station isn't an anomaly. This site almost invariably runs warmer than all of central Florida and oft times as warm, sometimes warmer (nighttime only) that s.e. Florida. It must be because of all the heat absorbing concrete at the airport, plus being right on the Gulf.

Temperature plots.jpg

Just to clarify on Albert Whitted, the airport is basically a pier going out into Tampa Bay. A few neighborhoods immediately on the water like Tropical Shores and Coquina Key really are that warm, but most places in St. Pete are a little colder. 

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UK_Palms

I'm pretty sure the furthest north in the world that coconuts can be cultivated year-round, without protection, is in the Canary Islands at 28N. And even there, I think they are only capable of being grown on the leeward, south sides of the islands. 

I know they manage to grow them in Andalusia in southern Spain and also in Cyprus, which are statistically the warmest locations in Europe outside of the Canaries, but they still need winter protection in these areas and are known to be killed off completely in abnormally cold, wet winters every 5 years or so. 

I have seen people growing coconut palms in the UK, but they obviously have to spend 9 months of the year indoors where there is supplemented heat. I know there is a large coconut palm at a garden centre, not far from me, which is kept in a large greenhouse/hothouse that is open to the public, and then it is brought outside in early June. Last year it had to be brought back inside by mid-August, but I have known them to leave it outdoors until early-mid September in warmer years. 

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