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Coconut Growing Farthest From Equator

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Laisla87
1 hour ago, Nick1985 said:

Hi John

i think Adam was just pointing out the area it was growing. That’s an Ancrontophoenix cunninghamiana. Very common in Sydney. 

Yes, my apologies if my post wasn't clear. I wanted to demonstrate the type of microclimate needed for a coconut to survive beyond a couple of years in Sydney. The coconut was removed well before the google-streetview pic. The site faces north-north east, is elevated and has heat pouring from the homes to the rear and off the 4-lane street.

That palm is indeed an Ancrontophoenix cunninghamiana - and quite a nice one at that!

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Nick1985
Just now, Laisla87 said:

Yes, my apologies if my post wasn't clear. I wanted to demonstrate the type of microclimate needed for a coconut to survive beyond a couple of years in Sydney. The coconut was removed well before the google-streetview pic. The site faces north-north east, is elevated and has heat pouring from the homes to the rear and off the 4-lane street.

That palm is indeed an Ancrontophoenix cunninghamiana - and quite a nice one at that!

My situation is the same. Elevated balcony, uncovered facing north. Blocked courtyard so sheltered completely from the southerly, in a large black pot. So hoping I can keep her alive for the winter. 

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Laisla87
10 minutes ago, Nick1985 said:

My situation is the same. Elevated balcony, uncovered facing north. Blocked courtyard so sheltered completely from the southerly, in a large black pot. So hoping I can keep her alive for the winter. 

The only problem is that on any given day, temperatures often vary as much as 10 degrees celcius depending where in Sydney you are... and some coastal suburbs are very windy, other places frosty. Here a frost has never been recorded. So many variables in Sydney, I'm sure in the right area and the right spot, a coconut could thrive again

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Nick1985
1 minute ago, Laisla87 said:

The only problem is that on any given day, temperatures often vary as much as 10 degrees celcius depending where in Sydney you are... and some coastal suburbs are very windy, other places frosty. Here a frost has never been recorded. So many variables in Sydney, I'm sure in the right area and the right spot, a coconut could thrive again

I hope so, I’m about 650m to the beach but don’t get the howling winds you get down there. Can only try I guess..... I haven’t seen below 8c on my thermo outside or on my car before so doesn’t get too cold. 

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Laisla87
1 minute ago, Nick1985 said:

I hope so, I’m about 650m to the beach but don’t get the howling winds you get down there. Can only try I guess..... I haven’t seen below 8c on my thermo outside or on my car before so doesn’t get too cold. 

That's a good start!

This spot is warm enough that the frangipanis don't defoliate over winter (shot is from July). Not many areas that frangipanis keep their leaves on all year here

Screen Shot 2018-02-25 at 7.55.31 pm.png

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Nick1985
3 minutes ago, Laisla87 said:

That's a good start!

This spot is warm enough that the frangipanis don't defoliate over winter (shot is from July). Not many areas that frangipanis keep their leaves on all year here

Screen Shot 2018-02-25 at 7.55.31 pm.png

We’ve got a Poinciana next door which flowers every year and plenty of pandanus trees so in with a good shot. 

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Laisla87
Just now, Nick1985 said:

We’ve got a Poinciana next door which flowers every year and plenty of pandanus trees so in with a good shot. 

Keep us posted on the coconut!

Poinciana do surprisingly well here; I've seen a flowering one in Leichhardt, Haberfield, Cabramatta and Warwick Farm (Liverpool)

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Tyrone
3 hours ago, Laisla87 said:

That's a good start!

This spot is warm enough that the frangipanis don't defoliate over winter (shot is from July). Not many areas that frangipanis keep their leaves on all year here

Screen Shot 2018-02-25 at 7.55.31 pm.png

Have you ever seen frangipanis in this area create seed pods. If you have then a coconut may be possible.

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Stelios
9 hours ago, Laisla87 said:

BTW, I will visit Funchal in Madeira in July. Does anyone know where I can see coconuts there?

Thank you

There is a topic here on PT by Cluster that shows the cocos on Madeira. I was there during Christmas and I found some of them and one on Porto Santo island. The easiest to see are in Marina Funchal.

 

 

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Mr. Coconut Palm
10 hours ago, Nick1985 said:

Hi John

i think Adam was just pointing out the area it was growing. That’s an Ancrontophoenix cunninghamiana. Very common in Sydney. 

Hi Nick,

I thought it looked kind of like a Archontophoenix, but wasn't sure which one.  I have grown the alexandrae in the ground here for a few years, but the freezes we had in Jan. 2017 wiped it out.  Now, I am going to try a maxima, which I think is the largest of the Archontophoenix, and maybe the most cold hardy?  I have tried a cunninghamiana in a pot here, but it didn't do well and eventually died.  It makes sense that you have a lot of King Palms over there, since they are native to eastern Australia.  Kings can do well where Coconut Palms can't, like in Southern California.

John

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Mr. Coconut Palm
10 hours ago, Nick1985 said:

Hi John

i think Adam was just pointing out the area it was growing. That’s an Ancrontophoenix cunninghamiana. Very common in Sydney. 

You are right, Nick.  I reread his post, and he was just pointing out the area.  I just misunderstood him since the Archontophoenix is so visible in the photo and assumed he was referring to it.

John

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Mr. Coconut Palm
9 hours ago, Laisla87 said:

Yes, my apologies if my post wasn't clear. I wanted to demonstrate the type of microclimate needed for a coconut to survive beyond a couple of years in Sydney. The coconut was removed well before the google-streetview pic. The site faces north-north east, is elevated and has heat pouring from the homes to the rear and off the 4-lane street.

That palm is indeed an Ancrontophoenix cunninghamiana - and quite a nice one at that!

Sorry, for the misunderstanding, Adam.  I assumed you were referring to the Archontophoenix since it is so visible in the photo.  It is a nice one, but no surprise since they are native to Australia!

John

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Alicante

Ok so at the moment, these are the results:

Northernmost growing without any kind of artificial protection: La Quinta, CA 33º40'N

Southernmost one: Port Elizabeth, SA 34ºS. Sydney comes close at 33º50'S but we'll have to wait for the next 2-3 winters.

 

Edited by Alicante
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kingdom67

ıkıpo.jpg

They look happy in the photo. Does salt support the roots of trees?

Sea Rim State Park I want to plant 10ft coconut on a beach in Texas, a few meters away from the sea.

Coconuts hate lots of winter rain. In northern texas, winters are rainy; do you think salt and warm ocean water can do the doping of the root?

For Meristem, the weather on this beach is adequate. The warm salty shore for the root, yes, what do you think about it?

Apart from the estate garden, did I try for the beach? :) Am I the first time in history?

I will make a video while sewing coconut.

Edited by kingdom67

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Nick1985
10 minutes ago, kingdom67 said:

ıkıpo.jpg

They look happy in the photo. Does salt support the roots of trees?

Sea Rim State Park I want to plant 10ft coconut on a beach in Texas, a few meters away from the sea.

Coconuts hate lots of winter rain. In northern texas, winters are rainy; do you think salt and warm ocean water can do the doping of the root?

For Meristem, the weather on this beach is adequate. The warm salty shore for the root, yes, what do you think about it?

Apart from the estate garden, did I try for the beach? :) Am I the first time in history?

I will make a video while sewing coconut.

The issues are the lows. I had a look at the climate for Galveston. Looks warm on first glance but has had lows of below -10c! 

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Xenon
6 hours ago, Nick1985 said:

The issues are the lows. I had a look at the climate for Galveston. Looks warm on first glance but has had lows of below -10c! 

There are fruiting coconuts in deep southern Texas where the record low is also -10 or -11C (set in 1899). It just doesn't happen very often, maybe once in a millennium or something like that. Although Galveston is a bit more freeze prone, the real problem is the cool winter. Average highs 16-18C are not going to cut it.  Near the Mexican border, average highs in the winter are 21-23C. 

Edited by Xenon
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kingdom67

The depth of the beach, warm under the sand. Moreover, it is as warm as 150 meters to the land.

It can be tried in Australian southern coasts and in european mediterranean coasts.

Seawater temperatures are similar to malaga spain; The only risk in my region is the wind that breaks the harvester.

00.PNG

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Xenon
38 minutes ago, kingdom67 said:

The depth of the beach, warm under the sand. Moreover, it is as warm as 150 meters to the land.

It can be tried in Australian southern coasts and in european mediterranean coasts.

Seawater temperatures are similar to malaga spain; The only risk in my region is the wind that breaks the harvester.

00.PNG

Do you actually live in Galveston? Coconuts will not last for more than a few seasons there even if you are lucky. Many ave tried before. Winters too cool. 

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Nick1985
16 minutes ago, Xenon said:

Do you actually live in Galveston? Coconuts will not last for more than a few seasons there even if you are lucky. Many ave tried before. Winters too cool. 

Yep no way a coconut can put up with freezes experienced there. That’s the issue with the US, they can get generally mild-warm winters but they get these polar freezes that ruin any chance. 

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kingdom67

I think I will give up.

Port Arthur and Mimamiden, as if the California have more wintering temperatures. Measurements are not so.

I witnessed the same freezing cold in miami during the winter, it's weird. I do not understand the difference.

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Nick1985
51 minutes ago, kingdom67 said:

I think I will give up.

Port Arthur and Mimamiden, as if the California have more wintering temperatures. Measurements are not so.

I witnessed the same freezing cold in miami during the winter, it's weird. I do not understand the difference.

It comes down to averages I guess, Miami and Florida have averages in the 20's. It also only rarely sees temps below 10c. 

I think it's different in Texas, particularly the northern area.

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kingdom67

 

 

a.PNG

b.PNG

 

d.PNG

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Punta+del+Diablo,+Rocha+Department,+Uruguay/@-34.0503649,-53.5483075,3831m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x95732d9bf6d89ed7:0xd1d3cc04626ecb77!8m2!3d-34.0423394!4d-53.5473322

Sydney, Perth, Zakynthos, Uruguay, Cape town, (average winter 60-65 ° F) Can this coastal method be applied in cool and rainy winters?

Rainy winters, coconut palm root, fungal disease and death...

The sea water is salty, the sand near the sea is warm in winter, salty, I wonder; can it give such a chance?

 

l78p.jpg

c.PNG

Edited by kingdom67
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Nick1985
7 minutes ago, kingdom67 said:

 

 

a.PNG

b.PNG

c.PNG

d.PNG

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Punta+del+Diablo,+Rocha+Department,+Uruguay/@-34.0503649,-53.5483075,3831m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x95732d9bf6d89ed7:0xd1d3cc04626ecb77!8m2!3d-34.0423394!4d-53.5473322

Sydney, Perth, Zakynthos, Uruguay, Cape town, (average winter 60-65 ° F) Can this coastal method be applied in cool and rainy winters?

Rainy winters, coconut palm root, fungal disease and death...

The sea water is salty, the sand near the sea is warm in winter, salty, I wonder; can it give such a chance?

 

l78p.jpg

But are there plants growing in these places?

 

Sydney record low is 2c, I have only ever seen 5c in my life. Max temps generally 18-21c through winter last decade or two, and even here is pushing it.

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kingdom67

The shoreline yellow sign in the photo. Is the sea waves, the point where the sea touches, the coconut planted? Did I ever try to do this? The coasts are a few degrees warm and salty; Salt is beneficial to coconut root :)

Edited by kingdom67

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GottmitAlex
1 hour ago, kingdom67 said:

The shoreline yellow sign in the photo. Is the sea waves, the point where the sea touches, the coconut planted? Did I ever try to do this? The coasts are a few degrees warm and salty; Salt is beneficial to coconut root :)

Yes, but salt won't save it from cold water constantly wetting the roots. 

I liked the 2300 ft location from the beach.

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Mr. Coconut Palm
13 hours ago, kingdom67 said:

ıkıpo.jpg

They look happy in the photo. Does salt support the roots of trees?

Sea Rim State Park I want to plant 10ft coconut on a beach in Texas, a few meters away from the sea.

Coconuts hate lots of winter rain. In northern texas, winters are rainy; do you think salt and warm ocean water can do the doping of the root?

For Meristem, the weather on this beach is adequate. The warm salty shore for the root, yes, what do you think about it?

Apart from the estate garden, did I try for the beach? :) Am I the first time in history?

I will make a video while sewing coconut.

Christian,

Sorry, but there is NO WAY a Coconut Palm, not even a Mexican Tall could make it at Sea Rim State Park.  We have a hard time growing Coconut Palms here in the Corpus Christi area (We are at the absolute northernmost limit of where they can be grown on the Texas Coast and are a good 200 + miles south down the coast of where you want to plant them.), and we are way down the coast from Sea Rim State Park, which as I recall is in the Port Arthur area at the northernmost part of the Texas Coast. Even on Galveston Island they can't make it through the winter.  I and others have tried there.  About 20 years ago, Moody Gardens in Galveston even tried 3 of them in the ground, but they only lasted about 2 years.

John

P.S.  If you would like to try planting some on the Texas Coast, plant some at some parks on North Padre Island, South Padre Island, or in a  not too visible spot at Boca Chica (the Rio Grande Delta), so it could get some size to it before someone would try to dig it up and take it home.  In these locations, especially the last two locations, they would make it through the winters quite well and grow to maturity if they got enough water.

 

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Mr. Coconut Palm
7 hours ago, kingdom67 said:

The depth of the beach, warm under the sand. Moreover, it is as warm as 150 meters to the land.

It can be tried in Australian southern coasts and in european mediterranean coasts.

Seawater temperatures are similar to malaga spain; The only risk in my region is the wind that breaks the harvester.

00.PNG

Average sea water temps in Galveston and the upper Texas Coast in Jan. are around 52F to 53F, and sometimes drop down to 46F to 48F with the passage of really bad Arctic fronts, so I don't know where you got these statistics from.  Even as far south as South Padre Island, the Jan. sea water temps average around 58F, which is too cold for tropical corals to grow on the jetties there.  Even the more cold hardy tropical corals, like some of the start corals, need a minimum sea water temp of at least 62F in the middle of winter.

John

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Mr. Coconut Palm
6 hours ago, Nick1985 said:

Yep no way a coconut can put up with freezes experienced there. That’s the issue with the US, they can get generally mild-warm winters but they get these polar freezes that ruin any chance. 

Nick,

Actually, our South Texas Coconut Palms that we grow on the South Texas Coast (as opposed to the North Texas Coast, like Galveston) can handle the occasional freeze down to the upper 20'sF if they aren't too severe and not every winter, better than they can handle the extended chilly damp conditions that the upper Texas Coast frequently has in December, January, and February, and that we sometimes have here on the South Texas Coast.  It is these prolonged days on end, sometimes a week or even a week and a half of high temps in the 40'S and lows in the 30'sF to around 40F, especially with drizzle or light rain that can really do in our Coconut Palms here, more so than the occasional light freeze once every few years.

John

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Mr. Coconut Palm
6 hours ago, kingdom67 said:

I think I will give up.

Port Arthur and Mimamiden, as if the California have more wintering temperatures. Measurements are not so.

I witnessed the same freezing cold in miami during the winter, it's weird. I do not understand the difference.

The difference is freezes are very rare in Miami, where it may get down to 31F or 32F once every 20 years and only for a very short duration.  Even on such rare mornings in Miami, they get back up into the 50'sF by the afternoon, whereas, the North Texas Coast has remained below freezing for days on end, even in the middle of the afternoon, like in the 1983 and 1989 freezes, but fortunately that is rare there, but once every 2 to 3 winters, though the Upper Texas Coast can have a day or so that they don't get above freezing.  Miami in particular, and South Florida in general average MUCH WARMER highs and lows in the wintertime than the Upper Texas Coast does, even warmer than the Rio Grande Valley, which is much further south than the Upper Texas Coast!  The Rio Grande Valley is just across the threshold of minimum wintertime average temps in which Coconut Palms can grow fairly well to maturity and even retain fruits on them in the winter.

John 

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Mr. Coconut Palm

Also, here in Corpus Christi, those of us on the east side of town near the water are JUST AT the threshold where a Coconut Palm can survive ( though not do well) in the wintertime, which is why it is possible to grow them here to a limited extent and to even occasionally get one to grow to maturity and to produce a few nuts, but even so, they are very marginal here, as opposed to the more suitable climate for them in the Rio Grande Valley south of here.

John

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Alicante
10 hours ago, kingdom67 said:

 

 

a.PNG

b.PNG

 

d.PNG

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Punta+del+Diablo,+Rocha+Department,+Uruguay/@-34.0503649,-53.5483075,3831m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x95732d9bf6d89ed7:0xd1d3cc04626ecb77!8m2!3d-34.0423394!4d-53.5473322

Sydney, Perth, Zakynthos, Uruguay, Cape town, (average winter 60-65 ° F) Can this coastal method be applied in cool and rainy winters?

Rainy winters, coconut palm root, fungal disease and death...

The sea water is salty, the sand near the sea is warm in winter, salty, I wonder; can it give such a chance?

 

l78p.jpg

c.PNG

Hey Kingdom, I think you don't understand completely the requirements of a coconut. Greece and most of Uruguay have way too cool winter highs for a coconut. Cape Town has a high average of 17.5ºC in the coldest month, but that was 1961-1990 averages so nowadays it's probably 18ºC, but that's a bit inland in the city, as the coastline is even milder, that is cooler lows. I don't think a long term one can stand in Cape Town but surely can more than anywhere else in Europe. 

In Uruguay they can maybe grow in the places I mentioned the other day, in the very north of the country (inland) such as Bella Unión, in latitudes between 30-31ºN such as this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bella_Uni%C3%B3n#Climate_data but 0 chance across the Uruguayan coast. In Punta del Diablo the winter is the wettest season as well, and as it was mentioned before by other users here, too much winter rain outside of warm climates (winters of at least +19/20ºC average highs) is harmful for coconuts. There are few exceptions like Porto Santo which at the same time have very mild lows (+13ºC)

In Greece they have been tried before but with 0 success. Zakynthos has 6 months with average highs under 20ºC, 3 under 16ºC and 2 only average with 14.4-14.5ºC highs. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zakynthos#Climate even in the warmest place Greece has, Crete (if i'm not wrong, Crete is the warmest) at 35ºN has highs which are still too cool for a coconut.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heraklion#Climate highs of 15-16ºC are not enough even if lows are 9-10ºC.

9 hours ago, Nick1985 said:

But are there plants growing in these places?

 

Sydney record low is 2c, I have only ever seen 5c in my life. Max temps generally 18-21c through winter last decade or two, and even here is pushing it.

Nope, I guess they're just suppositions. 

Edited by Alicante

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kingdom67
9 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Yes, but salt won't save it from cold water constantly wetting the roots. 

I liked the 2300 ft location from the beach.

I would like to thank all of you for the information they gave. 

I am also very grateful to GottmitAlex; the essence of this thing, thank you for catching. 

Do you know of a climate example in which this method can take place?

 

rr-000129-Dominikanische-Republik-shutterstock-medium - Kopya.jpg

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Nick1985
1 minute ago, kingdom67 said:

I would like to thank all of you for the information they gave. 

I am also very grateful to GottmitAlex; the essence of this thing, thank you for catching. 

Do you know of a climate example in which this method can take place?

 

rr-000129-Dominikanische-Republik-shutterstock-medium - Kopya.jpg

This would be almost equatorial i’d Imagine. Within 10-15degrees of the equator. 

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kingdom67

Yes Texas 14-15 ° F. The ocean water is also cold.

0.jpg

As long as there are no frequent and summit colds. I think it is not a dream on such wet and winter beaches, but only on hot sandy beaches.

I think the sea is not just salt, but the temperature of the coastal zone will be affected by one or two degrees.

I do not think the coast will be hotter and you will be affected by frost.

I will say that, there is no trial or error about this or no statistics; outside the property gardens.

2.jpg

Edited by kingdom67
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Anamurlu

What are these? I really do not understand anything.

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Nick1985
7 hours ago, Anamurlu said:

What are these? I really do not understand anything.

 

Edited by Nick1985

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kingdom67
17 hours ago, Nick1985 said:

 

Winter climate, average 60 ° F & 70 ° F
Winter sea temperature: 60 ° F

In these conditions, cultivating coconut is not a imagined, I think.

Property gardens are far from the sea...

On coastal land reached by sea waves; yes, this moist-wet points coconut should be tried.

The sea coast is a few degrees warmer; because, combined with sea water, for coconut, this could be a miracle.

In winter the rainwater will not be able to damage the coconut roots.

TurkishRiviera.jpg

2.jpg.16a8d0990a941bc2b773717c02a75b9b.jpg

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Tropicɑl desert
On 02.02.2016 14:56:51, kutsalangemon said:

I will try one to germinate in Turkey,Marmaris (Southwest part of Turkey) 36 51 degree next summer. I hope it work because so many tropical plants can easily germinate in South part of Turkey (Mango, Avocado, Pineapple, Coffee, Banana, Star Fruit, Papaya etc) but no one ever tried coconut. Winters are mild and summers are hot in Marmaris and humidity is the 2nd highest in Turkey. It is generally between 15 - 20C in winter time. You may find related climate info on pictures. What do you think ? Is it possible to grow coconut in South of Turkey Marmaris? If i plant it near the sea does coconut can import its water from sea in summer time (drought time) so there may not be insufficient water need?

monthly-Weather-Marmaris.png

average-relative-humidity-turkey-marmaris (1).png

Marmaris İklim Sınıflandırması.png

I am located in Iskenderun in Turkey, it is coconut can have in my district?

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Tropicɑl desert

Most information fiasco on this platform... Bot, robot, troll most things. Conflicting, confusing.

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