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Coconut Growing Farthest From Equator

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Cluster

Adam,

Those values are wrong and Santa Catarina is not Funchal, it is the airport in the east, how many times do I need to tell you that:lol:. I am glad you are talking about this February because as you know the airport of Lanzerote reached 7.8 C, it is not normal at all. There are values for Ponta do sol 61-90 they have 13.5, for comparison Funchal was around  12,9 in 61-90. Lugar de baixo station that meets all the highest standards and far from UHI. Lugar de baixo is mostly volcanic with a few houses, smaller than a small village but that is not even where the station is. If you want I show you the source. The Bajamar person had a low of 8 in that thread Carlo said so. Bajamar is not that warm especially at higher elevations. 

Lugar de Baixo is a southwest zone so it is naturally sheltered, but it can't compete with Madalena do Mar or Paul do Mar which are warmer and more sheltered with more sun. Adam if you do not want to listen and learn I can't force you, sorry. 

 

 

 

Edited by Cluster
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Alicante
14 minutes ago, Nick1985 said:

Yes I’ve noticed constant comparisons for Canaries-Madeira-Azores. They’re all moderated by sea but in that order they are a few degrees warmer than the other. 

Looking at Canaries I would say they have a similar climate to northern New South Wales in Australia or possibly Gold Coast. Although coconuts grow and fruit unattended throughout northern NSW & SE QLD. I’m unsure what they’re like in the canaries. 

The Azores I think would be impossible for a coconut but please prove me wrong. No need to argue just make an attempt and good luck. It would definitely be the furtherest from the equator I’ve heard of. 

Coconuts fruit anywhere in the Canaries, but they do need irrigation because 95% of the coastal areas are very dry. 

hibiscus-flowers-coconut-palm-and-typica

About the Gold Coast/NSW thing, the Canarian winters are a lot warmer, especially when compared to northern NSW. The difference is huge, I see Byron Bay gets 19/12 in the coldest month. Gold Coast gets 21/12 in the coldest month I see, for example Tenerife south gets 22/15 or Hierro gets 21/16, amongst others.

To see similar winters to the Canaries, you must go further north to Gladstone, QLD (23º 50' S) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gladstone,_Queensland#Climate

I did some research on that zone you said, i'm surprised how Sunshine Coast can get colder than the Gold Coast even being 2º closer to the Equator. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunshine_Coast,_Queensland#Climate They even registered freezes (-0.7ºC). Just to let you know, Hierro in the Canaries for example is 12b, which is a typical hardiness zone you'd find in the tropics. Actually the Canaries are technically tropical if we use the 18ºC threshold in the coldest month, but they're too dry to have any kind of known tropical climate so they're hot desertic or hot semi-arid for instance. You have to keep in mind that they're surrounded by warm Oceanic waters after all! Still Canaries go from 27 to 29ºN, Madeira or Bermuda are at 32ºN so they win in furthermost! (at the moment)

Edited by Alicante

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Alicante
19 minutes ago, Cluster said:

Adam,

Those values are wrong and Santa Catarina is not Funchal, it is the airport in the east, how many times do I need to tell you that:lol:. I am glad you are talking about this February because as you know the airport of Lanzerote reached 7.8 C, it is not normal at all. There are values for Ponta do sol 61-90 they have 13.5, for comparison Funchal was around  12,9 in 61-90. Lugar de baixo station that meets all the highest standards and far from UHI. Lugar de baixo is mostly volcanic with a few houses, smaller than a small village but that is not even where the station. If you want I show you the source. The Bajamar person had a low of 8 in that thread Carlo said so. Bajamar is not that warm especially at higher elevations. 

Lugar de Baixo is a southwest zone so it is naturally sheltered, but it can't compete with Madalena do Mar or Paul do Mar which are warmer and more sheltered with more sun. Adam if you do not want to listen and learn I can't force you, sorry. 

 

 

 

What? :blink: They're the only official averages IPMA provides for Madeira. http://www.ipma.pt/pt/oclima/normais.clima/1981-2010/009/ a 10.8ºC low in Funchal is not that rare as you know, as the record is 7.4ºC. I know, but that 7.8ºC temp in Lanzarote broke the all time historical record low from the whole island!

And about the other things... they're just estimations my friend, because some months got warmer than normal it doesn't make a long term average. Madalena do Mar for example is just an estimation to be the warmest place, and still can't be proven with any source so it's most likely after all a personal opinion. It's not I don't want to learn, it's that no one can take something as valid without data backing it up. Mogan Port in southern Gran Canaria, always is very warm and would provide some 23/17 temps in January, so Mogan would be "ultra tropical", but I don't use it as the warmest place for some station, even if it's official by AEMET. We haven't got an official long term average to back it up, that's why I only use 1981-2010 averages, same as I use for Funchal. These are more realistic imho...

Edited by Alicante

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Nick1985
11 minutes ago, Alicante said:

Coconuts fruit anywhere in the Canaries, but they do need irrigation because 95% of the coastal areas are very dry. 

hibiscus-flowers-coconut-palm-and-typica

About the Gold Coast/NSW thing, the Canarian winters are a lot warmer, especially when compared to northern NSW. The difference is huge, I see Byron Bay gets 19/12 in the coldest month. Gold Coast gets 21/12 in the coldest month I see, for example Tenerife south gets 22/15 or Hierro gets 21/16, amongst others.

To see similar winters to the Canaries, you must go further north to Gladstone, QLD (23º 50' S) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gladstone,_Queensland#Climate

I did some research on that zone you said, i'm surprised how Sunshine Coast can get colder than the Gold Coast even being 2º closer to the Equator. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunshine_Coast,_Queensland#Climate They even registered freezes (-0.7ºC). Just to let you know, Hierro in the Canaries for example is 12b, which is a typical hardiness zone you'd find in the tropics. Actually the Canaries are technically tropical if we use the 18ºC threshold in the coldest month, but they're too dry to have any kind of known tropical climate so they're hot desertic or hot semi-arid for instance. You have to keep in mind that they're surrounded by warm Oceanic waters after all! Still Canaries go from 27 to 29ºN, Madeira or Bermuda are at 32ºN so they win in furthermost! (at the moment)

Yes I agree with you there. The high temps are more or less correct but the lows are lower than the Canaries by a few degrees. Some would say the Gold Coast has a tropical climate also, most years lately the average highs have been around 23-34. It’s a pleasant climate, almost perfect I would say. 

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Cluster

I talk to you in private anyway this is a topic about the furthest coconut. My bet if something viable can grow long term, maybe Azores, if not long term anything is possible.

 

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Alicante
12 minutes ago, Nick1985 said:

Yes I agree with you there. The high temps are more or less correct but the lows are lower than the Canaries by a few degrees. Some would say the Gold Coast has a tropical climate also, most years lately the average highs have been around 23-34. It’s a pleasant climate, almost perfect I would say. 

Gold Coast has very nice temps, the only thing is I don't like very rainy climates. But temps alone, Gold Coast is a 9/10 for me! Oceania is the best continent climate-wise, no doubt at all. And it's because of Australia, which is like, 95% of the continent? :D Even the desert of Australia is epic, it's not that hot as the Death Valley, Rub Al Khali or Sahara to put some examples. (Coober Pedy climate, 29ºS) or (Alice Springs climate, 23ºS) Australian deserts have an awesome climate!

Edited by Alicante

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Lior_Gal
On 12/14/2010, 8:10:27, Eric in Orlando said:

Can they grow coconuts in Israel ?

 

How far north in Egypt are they found?

 

Also, how far along the west coast of Morrocco ?

Hello There Eric, 

I grow coconuts in Israel, I did a few mistakes that cost me a lot (8 dead coconuts) but i kept on learning and studying, So I improve every year. 

Now as you can see, One of my friend purchased hawaiian tall coconut from me, its 4 meters high these days.5a8c59b111dd2_HawaiianCoco3.jpg.b2d755fd5a8c59a331cc8_HawaiianCoco2.jpg.b7fb0bc15a8c59b111dd2_HawaiianCoco3.jpg.b2d755fd

Hawaiian Coco1.jpg

Hawaiian Trunk1.jpg

Hawaiian Coco4.jpg

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Nick1985

Nice work Lior

if they can grow there. Potentially they could grow in Cyprus too?

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Alicante
35 minutes ago, Nick1985 said:

Nice work Lior

if they can grow there. Potentially they could grow in Cyprus too?

17.5/9.6 is the coldest month in the 30 year winter averages in Tel Aviv, which is significantly warmer than southern Cyprus.

As we're talking about Cyprus, within the Middle East Lior's zone has more potential to grow them, there is a forum user here growing one in southern Cyprus since 2012 I think but it's protected every winter. A couple of years ago, that place had a 0°C low and even well protected, the palm had strong damage but it recovered with a sunny spring. In Israel they won't need protection at all, or if anything just some days a year.

Edited by Alicante

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Lior_Gal
33 minutes ago, Nick1985 said:

Nice work Lior

if they can grow there. Potentially they could grow in Cyprus too?

Thanks NIck, 

The answer is yes, I have a Friend that lives in Cyprus, His name is Stelios, 

and he is also a PalmTalk Member, He Grows a Coconut Palm in the ground

for 6 years, So he is doing quite well... I hope it will make it through many more 

years, you can see it in the following link:

 

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Lior_Gal
8 minutes ago, Alicante said:

17.5/9.6 are the 30 year winter averages in Tel Aviv, while in the southern coast of Cyprus the long term ones are like 16.7/7.4°C. Cyprus is almost identical to southern Spain, although with warmer summers. I don't think a long term one is possible, just like here.

Lior's zone has more potential to grow them, there is a forum user here growing one in southern Cyprus but it's protected every winter. A couple of years ago, that place had a 0°C low and even well protected, the palm had strong damage but it recovered with a sunny spring. In Israel they won't need protection at all, or if anything just some days a year.

Exactly, 

This Year, it was a "Tropical Winter" ....Mostly sunny days, A few short storms, No frosts in tel aviv, and mild raining, So it was perfect for my coconuts, Even the Hawaiian 

Tall which is considered to be a Delicate variety, Made it through the strong storms (there where a few stormy says) No burned fronds, and it looks awesome 4 meters tall

with robust and huge trunk (as you know, the hawaiian tall fruits are huge with the husk) so you can compare the trunks size near the Fruit itself and see how thick it became.

It's just needs more care before winter, around January it should be watered once or twice with copper based anti fungi, and planting it in well drained soil.

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Mr. Coconut Palm
On ‎2‎/‎19‎/‎2018‎ ‎1‎:‎21‎:‎46‎, Nick1985 said:

I would be worried about the lack of warm weather in the Azores. The lows certainly are high enough but the highs not. Especially as I believe coconuts will only really stand 1-2 months with max temps below 20. Historically I don’t think sydney could do it. But average high temps over winter for the last decade have been around 19-20 so that’s the only reason I am trying. I think if I left it out on the odd day out high is 14-15 it wouldn’t survive. Looking at Europe that’s quite a common occurance. 

Nick,

You are right, they can only stand about two months tops of highs below 20C (68F).  I live at the northernmost limit on the Texas Coast where they can be grown, and they are very marginal here.  My average high/low in Dec. is about 20.5C/12.5C (68.9F/54.5F), in Jan. is about 18C/10C (64.4F/50.0F), and in Feb. is about 20.5C/12.5C (68.9F/54.5F) again, but after that, we significantly warm up to highs/lows in July of about 35C/25.5C (95F/77.9F), which is our warmest month here.  My annual average temp here is approximately 72F.  What makes it possible to grow them to maturity here is our warm springs, hot summers, warm falls, and relatively mild winters.  Even though we have what would be called a very cool wintertime climate compared to tropical Coconut Palm growing areas, we really warm up rapidly by mid to late Feb. here and stay warm into Nov. here.

John

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Nick1985

John you shouldn’t have an issue with those temps. Only worry would be the cold northerlies you occasionally get. 

Coconut aside. Pretty chuffed to harvest my first pineapple. Grown from a top chopped off one from the market. Have had 20-30 plants of it, have had to bin heaps of them. 

9EA016ED-A65D-42CA-876D-6464C08F31B7.jpeg

687863FB-5C03-4F36-9213-FE6AA536589F.jpeg

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Cluster

This is a very interesting discussion  and for years I believed it to be true, the magic 20 C (68 F) number.

I personally like to learn with others, their mistakes and successes and my own of course.

But lets look at the actual facts. Sydney, Tel Aviv, Málaga, Limassol, Porto Santo (at least the only Station I know in the airport which is inland and higher elevation), none of them get 20 C average highs for at least a period of 3 months. Porto Santo however has lows that are higher for 6 months (and way higher in the coldest month) than all of these places and it is stable, especially in record low events, it is also the only place from all of these places I know a coconut can thrive long term totally unprotected. 

Do notice I am not saying the other places can't achieve the same feat, what I am saying is that at least one of those places, Porto Santo, does not meet the 20 C average for more than 2 months and it thrives there and is not using any "magic" to do so besides the very nice lows (in fact above Funchal/Observatory in the coldest month supposedly).

I believe, based on several observations and reports, sun, a very well drained soil (they really seem to love sand) and not much water when it is cooler in these marginal climates, might be as important if not more important than 1 or 2 C (2 to 4 F). However, I also believe good lows are very important and should not be discarded at all. Giving your coconut "magic", like sheltered spots, a balcony near your warm house, walls, some blankets if near frost and so on, in these conditions, might be the difference between succeeding or not. Last but not the least, you might have nice averages and in theory it is enough for a coconut to survive but if your weather is not stable enough and you go into the worst winters the typical average temperature scenario will then be far lower than what a coconut needs and there is not much to do about it, other than substantial protection. In some situations this happens every other year, others might have these every 10/20. 

In any case I know for sure 20 C is not needed, at least not necessarily for all locations on earth.

Possible Key points on the success of Porto Santo, that might help to explain why the coconut/s does good there at 33 N regardless of "low highs":

  • The cocos are near the beach as in less than 100 m (328 feet) and around 10 meter elevation (33 ft). At this location expect average lows of 14 C (57 F) for the coolest month since the airport, inland at 80 m elevation (262 feet), is already warmer than Funchal /Observatory in February. The record low seems to be around 5 C (41 F) for the airport, expect it to be a bit higher near the beach. Not sure about highs but the airport should be around 18.5+ C (65.3 + F) for the coldest month. A very stable climate overall.
  • It seems the cocos are using the native well drained soil near the beach which would be sand made of dead coral (many many years ago) mixed with the volcanic material from the island.
  • It barely rains there, with 382 mm (15 inches, the threshold of what is considered a desert climate) of rain per year and even winters do not have enough water for optimal coconut growth, this might be a curse but it is actually a blessing as you can control the water they get during the winter and will not stress the roots with cool water in the cooler days, especially with the sandy soil.
  • It is known that Porto Santo has more sunshine hours than Funchal/Observatory station which already has more sunshine than Corpus Christi in their respective coldest months. (However CC has more sunshine hours overall during the year than Funchal/Observatory and higher UV).

The cocos should be around this red zone from what i understood:

GnKaHHg.png

 

Lior so far succeed during his mild winter with an Hawaiin tall variety planted with good drainage (due to the sand mixed with the other parts he mentioned), near a wall corner and this pretty much seems to be working. Within the years more things will be clear for all of us, trying to push the limits.

PS: If there were palm enthusiasts in Porto Santo that beach would look awesome with cocos waving at us:)

 

Edited by Cluster
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Cluster
2 hours ago, Nick1985 said:

John you shouldn’t have an issue with those temps. Only worry would be the cold northerlies you occasionally get. 

Coconut aside. Pretty chuffed to harvest my first pineapple. Grown from a top chopped off one from the market. Have had 20-30 plants of it, have had to bin heaps of them. 

9EA016ED-A65D-42CA-876D-6464C08F31B7.jpeg

687863FB-5C03-4F36-9213-FE6AA536589F.jpeg

Hey nick!

I am curious because I also want to do the same, how is the taste of your pineapple? It grew totally unprotected right? How long did it take from the day it got into the pot till you got it ripe?

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Aussiepalm
On 20/02/2018, 22:24:48, Alicante said:

Gold Coast has very nice temps, the only thing is I don't like very rainy climates. But temps alone, Gold Coast is a 9/10 for me! Oceania is the best continent climate-wise, no doubt at all. And it's because of Australia, which is like, 95% of the continent? :D Even the desert of Australia is epic, it's not that hot as the Death Valley, Rub Al Khali or Sahara to put some examples. (Coober Pedy climate, 29ºS) or (Alice Springs climate, 23ºS) Australian deserts have an awesome climate!

Gold Coast is a lovely climate indeed. It is proper sub-tropical climate. 

There are far warmer desert areas in Australia than you have mentioned. Australia's hottest desert areas is in the Pilbara area, North West Australia.

Because of the vast area there are most certainly many extreme temperatures and climates and in Australia that go unrecorded.

Marble Bar is a great example of a very hot desert climate in Australia, see statistics below: much warmer than Death Valley in the cooler months. 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marble_Bar,_Western_Australia#Climate 

Further North closer to the coast in Western Australia we have extremely warm and humid climates such as Wyndham. Statistics below.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wyndham,_Western_Australia#Climate

Slightly off topic I realise, but always love sharing knowledge and facts about Australia's vast climates.

 

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kingdom67

Uruguay and Cape town it was forgotten...

I saw coconuts near Uruguay Rivera north.

Near Uruguay Rivera, east; I saw coconuts. The western part of Porto Allegro is inside.

These regions, like the Mediterranean climate; but more rainfall.

Edited by kingdom67

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Nick1985
7 hours ago, Aussiepalm said:

Gold Coast is a lovely climate indeed. It is proper sub-tropical climate. 

There are far warmer desert areas in Australia than you have mentioned. Australia's hottest desert areas is in the Pilbara area, North West Australia.

Because of the vast area there are most certainly many extreme temperatures and climates and in Australia that go unrecorded.

Marble Bar is a great example of a very hot desert climate in Australia, see statistics below: much warmer than Death Valley in the cooler months. 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marble_Bar,_Western_Australia#Climate 

Further North closer to the coast in Western Australia we have extremely warm and humid climates such as Wyndham. Statistics below.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wyndham,_Western_Australia#Climate

Slightly off topic I realise, but always love sharing knowledge and facts about Australia's vast climates.

 

I was going to get into this but felt it might cause a disagreement. 

For sure Australia has probably the harshest climates in the world. Darwin is one of the hottest cities in the world, Broome also and they’re coastal. As you said Marble Bar is a hot hot place. As is Cloncurry in QLD. Even Bourke in NSW can experience weeks with temps around 40-45c. These are harsh environments and extreme climates. 

As for the Gold Coast. Yes a perfect Subtropical climate. Aside from the 2-3 days a year it has max below 20c lately it would almost be considered tropical since the average the last few years has been around 23c in winter. 

I wouldn’t consider Alice Springs or Cooper Peedy awesome climates either. Can get pretty cold overnight in winter and stinking hot for months in summer. 

Edited by Nick1985

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Nick1985
7 hours ago, Cluster said:

Hey nick!

I am curious because I also want to do the same, how is the taste of your pineapple? It grew totally unprotected right? How long did it take from the day it got into the pot till you got it ripe?

I haven’t eaten it. I only got it last night. But the smell is very sweet, it’s going to be a good one!

yes completely unprotected. Not much watering in winter (only rainfall which was not much). I kept two plants and got two pineapples. One thing I think helped is there’s spiders living in the leaves. I think they help keep other bugs out 

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bubba

An area just mentioned by Kingdom67 that I had not considered for successful coconut cultivation in Uruguay. Specifically, a region referred to as Uruguay Riviera north, Uruguay Riviera east and Porto Allegro Uruguay. Montevideo, Uruguay is approximately 35 degrees South latitude. What are the latitudes of the above-referenced locations in Uruguay with successful coconut cultivation?

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Mr. Coconut Palm
21 hours ago, Nick1985 said:

John you shouldn’t have an issue with those temps. Only worry would be the cold northerlies you occasionally get. 

Coconut aside. Pretty chuffed to harvest my first pineapple. Grown from a top chopped off one from the market. Have had 20-30 plants of it, have had to bin heaps of them. 

9EA016ED-A65D-42CA-876D-6464C08F31B7.jpeg

687863FB-5C03-4F36-9213-FE6AA536589F.jpeg

Nick,

Yeah, our normal winter temps, while not pleasant for Coconut Palms, are certainly not killer temps, but like you said it is the occasional norther that brings down Arctic air from Canada that is the problem, along with wet and chlly Pacific fronts that bring us high temps around 48F to 52F for 5 to 7 days at a time with light rain and drizzle, that really present a problem for us. 

Wow!  Your pineapples look amazing!

John

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Daryl
On 2/20/2018, 9:24:48, Alicante said:

Gold Coast has very nice temps, the only thing is I don't like very rainy climates. But temps alone, Gold Coast is a 9/10 for me! Oceania is the best continent climate-wise, no doubt at all. And it's because of Australia, which is like, 95% of the continent? :D Even the desert of Australia is epic, it's not that hot as the Death Valley, Rub Al Khali or Sahara to put some examples. (Coober Pedy climate, 29ºS) or (Alice Springs climate, 23ºS) Australian deserts have an awesome climate!

The Gold Coast  does not really have a rainy climate...even though we usually get good rainfall, it is not very often...mainly from thunderstorms in the late afternoon or evening...most of the time it is just cloudless skies, which is why the beaches here are so popular. :)

As for the climate comparisons, the other variables to take into consideration are the warming and cooling times. Generally, the closer to the equator you get the longer the 'warm' part of the day is...so even though as an example, Hobart has a max temp of 30C, it it usually only for a short time during the day...the morning leading up to it is still cool and the afternoon cools significantly as well...compared to  a lower latitude city where it may be 30C by 8am and stays that way until after sunset...but ultimate max temperature is tempered by a trade wind off the ocean. Theoretically they have the same max temperature, but in real life they weather is worlds apart. You also have to consider the soil temps, water temps and solar radiation as these all impact on climate and growing conditions.

My relatives in Sydney often tell me how it is so 'tropical' at times, but it is all relative. I have lived for significant time in Sydney, Darwin and the Gold Coast, and have collected and grown palms the entire duration, so know from first-hand experience how the climates here compare. You could also apply this to the climates mentioned earlier in this thread as well, I'm sure.

At the end of the day, there is no substitute for lower latitude!  but this thread is not about that...I did have a coconut that survived for three years in the southern suburbs of Sydney...but it eventually succumbed to a cool winter. Microclimate is everything there.

 

Here's a recent pic of my young coconut, about 12 months in the ground...a long way from being the farthest from the equator, but it appears happy here on the Goldy! 

DSC_6706.thumb.jpg.a4dbeed649d541b7e9d28

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Nick1985
3 minutes ago, Daryl said:

The Gold Coast  does not really have a rainy climate...even though we usually get good rainfall, it is not very often...mainly from thunderstorms in the late afternoon or evening...most of the time it is just cloudless skies, which is why the beaches here are so popular. :)

As for the climate comparisons, the other variables to take into consideration are the warming and cooling times. Generally, the closer to the equator you get the longer the 'warm' part of the day is...so even though as an example, Hobart has a max temp of 30C, it it usually only for a short time during the day...the morning leading up to it is still cool and the afternoon cools significantly as well...compared to  a lower latitude city where it may be 30C by 8am and stays that way until after sunset...but ultimate max temperature is tempered by a trade wind off the ocean. Theoretically they have the same max temperature, but in real life they weather is worlds apart. You also have to consider the soil temps, water temps and solar radiation as these all impact on climate and growing conditions.

My relatives in Sydney often tell me how it is so 'tropical' at times, but it is all relative. I have lived for significant time in Sydney, Darwin and the Gold Coast, and have collected and grown palms the entire duration, so know from first-hand experience how the climates here compare. You could also apply this to the climates mentioned earlier in this thread as well, I'm sure.

At the end of the day, there is no substitute for lower latitude!  but this thread is not about that...I did have a coconut that survived for three years in the southern suburbs of Sydney...but it eventually succumbed to a cool winter. Microclimate is everything there.

 

Here's a recent pic of my young coconut, about 12 months in the ground...a long way from being the farthest from the equator, but it appears happy here on the Goldy! 

DSC_6706.thumb.jpg.a4dbeed649d541b7e9d28

Nice work mate. Looks great, that’s one thing I’m jealous of up there. Coconuts all along the beaches. I’ve got a place up there and will probably be up at some point in next few years. 

Sydney will be a struggle, my Palm will hopefully get through the next few winters, we’ll see. Any tips for a Sydney coco?

100% after with you on the latitude. In the GC I’m summer it feels 30c from 8-8 almost. That’s the humidity and UV. 

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GottmitAlex

When you folks mentioned Gold coast, I immediately thought you were referring to Ghana...

 

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Tyrone
On 19/02/2018, 9:22:57, Alicante said:

 

I agree with that, it should live in Sydney too, but a long term one probably is just a dream at the moment. That's why I was saying Perth sounds more realistic about a long term one, as it's warmer in winter.

Perth does have a latitude advantage over Sydney but Perth has much wetter winters than Sydney, which is not good for a coconut, but then perths deep beach sand substrate is perfect for coconuts. There are many Perth subclimate zones though. Perth suburbs technically stretch for around 160km in a north south direction. You would have a much better chance on the northern beach zones compared to Mandurah for example.

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kingdom67

I want to remind again, I told you ahead of time

bhj.PNG

Australia 33 degrees, but 36 degrees Turkey. I think Perth can catch it, why is there no coconut in Perth? Only latitudes or longitudes are not enough

Edited by kingdom67

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Tyrone

Perth is 32S and if you go into the northern suburbs high 31's and there is the odd coconut in Perth at least in the northern zones.

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Nick1985
17 hours ago, Tyrone said:

Perth does have a latitude advantage over Sydney but Perth has much wetter winters than Sydney, which is not good for a coconut, but then perths deep beach sand substrate is perfect for coconuts. There are many Perth subclimate zones though. Perth suburbs technically stretch for around 160km in a north south direction. You would have a much better chance on the northern beach zones compared to Mandurah for example.

Hows your one going Tyrone? 

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Alicante
On 21/2/2018 14:41:06, kingdom67 said:

Uruguay and Cape town it was forgotten...

I saw coconuts near Uruguay Rivera north.

Near Uruguay Rivera, east; I saw coconuts. The western part of Porto Allegro is inside.

These regions, like the Mediterranean climate; but more rainfall.

Are you sure these were coconuts? They can be easily mistaken with some other palms, specially when they're big palms, such as Howeas.

Coconuts in that area would be probably found just in some private gardens of palm lovers, but looking at the official averages, that area seems to lack warmth. Even if it's just at 30ºS. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rivera#Climate 6 months had extremes under freezing, two of them even up to -4.8 and -5.0ºC and the extremes ended in 1994 so probably it went colder in some point in the last 24 years and at least light freezes don't seem that rare in June and July, given the fact they reached -5.0ºC. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porto_Alegre#Climate Porto Alegre, Brazil can grow them but it's on the coast so the temps are warmer and the cold spells are much milder. 

Do you have some pics or hints about the zone? Now that area is fully covered by Street View.

About Cape Town, there aren't coconuts there, at least known by anyone because I tried to Google it and I didn't found nothing. Some guys tried to find it here some years ago but no success. Besides in Port Elizabeth, at the same latitude (34ºS) coconuts would grow without problem. Check their climate: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Elizabeth#Geography_and_climate winters are much warmer than in Cape Town. 

On 21/2/2018 22:38:35, bubba said:

An area just mentioned by Kingdom67 that I had not considered for successful coconut cultivation in Uruguay. Specifically, a region referred to as Uruguay Riviera north, Uruguay Riviera east and Porto Allegro Uruguay. Montevideo, Uruguay is approximately 35 degrees South latitude. What are the latitudes of the above-referenced locations in Uruguay with successful coconut cultivation?

Rivera is at 30ºN but still the climate seems too cool to hold one. Montevideo directly no chance. 15/7 in the coldest month... Bella Unión, Uruguay, it's in a zone with a warmer climate https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bella_Uni%C3%B3n#Climate_data , I think they can grow it without major problems. Both sun hours and natural rain are perfect for the palm and winters are warm. 

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Alicante
12 hours ago, kingdom67 said:

I want to remind again, I told you ahead of time

bhj.PNG

Australia 33 degrees, but 36 degrees Turkey. I think Perth can catch it, why is there no coconut in Perth? Only latitudes or longitudes are not enough

There aren't coconuts in Turkey, that place at 36ºN is the place which our Turk buddy has been using in this thread to show their averages. But they lack warmth in winter, two months have even high temps under 16ºC so that's directly discarded in my opinion. I think most people if not all would agree as well, that's not enough for a coconut. Also just as Tyrone said, coconuts hate lots of winter rain. And that zone of Turkey seems to receive most of it's rain during their winters. 

Edited by Alicante

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Anamurlu

I had a friend on the west bank of Preston Beach Australia who claimed to have a healthy coconut about 30ft long. He said even the fruits was extraordinary. He even thought it might be because of global warming. But Perth has never seen coconuts anywhere.

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Tyrone
On 24/02/2018, 3:58:46, Nick1985 said:

Hows your one going Tyrone? 

Dead now. The house was rented and tenants turned off irrigation for an extended period through summer and a percentage of the garden died. They were evicted and the house has been sold. I reckon it would still be alive if I was living there. It was given a lot of care by myself with particular care for nutrition and water and if any bugs got into it, I was right onto them. It lasted 9 years from planting had around 60cm of clear trunk and was well over 3m tall. Never rent your house out.

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Tyrone
9 hours ago, Anamurlu said:

But Perth has never seen coconuts anywhere.

Not true. In a protected spot in the right location you can get a coconut to live and grow in Perth, but only if you tend too it in a dedicated way. Neglect it and it likely will die over time.

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GottmitAlex
3 hours ago, Tyrone said:

Dead now. The house was rented and tenants turned off irrigation for an extended period through summer and a percentage of the garden died. They were evicted and the house has been sold. I reckon it would still be alive if I was living there. It was given a lot of care by myself with particular care for nutrition and water and if any bugs got into it, I was right onto them. It lasted 9 years from planting had around 60cm of clear trunk and was well over 3m tall. Never rent your house out.

Sorry to hear that T.

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Laisla87

On the east coast, coconuts have grown and survived in Sydney - Don Burke did a segment on one in the early 90s - but it is very hit and miss and they only survive in environments heavily modified by people. That usually involves being planted in a northerly position against a very old brick masonry wall in an elevated, sandy soil. In the late 1880s when most of the 2-3 storey homes in the (now) inner city were built, they used a type of brick and render that reflected a lot of heat and that (today) keeps things alive. A coconut planted in the open ground elsewhere without those conditions will not survive.

I recall one that was planted in the suburb of Redfern that did surprising well before the property was sold and the palm removed. It was in a raised spot on the southern side of a busy street beside hot tarmac. It was removed around 2003/2004 and had been growing since the early 90s. It was in the front garden in one of the houses in the pic. You can imagine the micro-climate there

Screen Shot 2018-02-25 at 3.27.47 pm.png

Edited by Laisla87
additional info

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Laisla87

BTW, I will visit Funchal in Madeira in July. Does anyone know where I can see coconuts there?

Thank you

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Mr. Coconut Palm
2 hours ago, Laisla87 said:

On the east coast, coconuts have grown and survived in Sydney - Don Burke did a segment on one in the early 90s - but it is very hit and miss and they only survive in environments heavily modified by people. That usually involves being planted in a northerly position against a very old brick masonry wall in an elevated, sandy soil. In the late 1880s when most of the 2-3 storey homes in the (now) inner city were built, they used a type of brick and render that reflected a lot of heat and that (today) keeps things alive. A coconut planted in the open ground elsewhere without those conditions will not survive.

I recall one that was planted in the suburb of Redfern that did surprising well before the property was sold and the palm removed. It was in a raised spot on the southern side of a busy street beside hot tarmac. It was removed around 2003/2004 and had been growing since the early 90s. It was in the front garden in one of the houses in the pic. You can imagine the micro-climate there

Screen Shot 2018-02-25 at 3.27.47 pm.png

Adam,

Sorry, but that palm in the photo is definitely NOT a Coconut Palm.  Notice the green crownshaft on the trunk under the crown of leaves?  Coconut Palms DO NOT have these.  And notice the cluster of small seeds hanging down on the right side of the trunk at the base of the crownshaft?  Coconut Palms have very large seed (the coconut) and they are borne on inflorescences (flower stalks) among the leaves in the crown.

John

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Nick1985
3 minutes ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Adam,

Sorry, but that palm in the photo is definitely NOT a Coconut Palm.  Notice the green crownshaft on the trunk under the crown of leaves?  Coconut Palms DO NOT have these.  And notice the cluster of small seeds hanging down on the right side of the trunk at the base of the crownshaft?  Coconut Palms have very large seed (the coconut) and they are borne on inflorescences (flower stalks) among the leaves in the crown.

John

Hi John

i think Adam was just pointing out the area it was growing. That’s an Ancrontophoenix cunninghamiana. Very common in Sydney. 

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