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metalfan

Anthurium pedatoradiatum

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metalfan

I got these plants from someone in Central FL as a trade. I have never seen the for sale anywhere in the flesh (or online). I think this is the A. pedatoradiatum ssp pedatoradiatum from photos I have seen of the 2 types.

She was growing them outdoors, and they were significantly unhappy about being left outside in winter and had almost gone completely dormant. I got them in, I believe, December and immediately greenhoused i them. I planted one in the ground and containerized one. Both went completely dormant. I had given them up for lost, when, in August, both suddenly popped up out of the soil!

The leaves still look immature.

I was wondering if anyone else has experience with this Anthurium? How large does it eventually get? Do you have photos you can share?

Here are mine:

DSCN5371.jpg

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metalfan

And the one in the ground:

DSCN5372.jpg

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metalfan

Its weird but they almost look like 2 different plants

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aussiearoids

I found them a bit temperamental ...

sometimes they just collapsed into nothing and then grow back later .

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palmmermaid

This looks like something Betty and I got from Martha Merkel when Adams and Merkel went out of business.  Ours has done fairly well, assuming it is the same plant.  It is in the shade hoiuse and gets watered daily.  We didn't know what it was.  I will take another look and see if indeed it is the same.

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metalfan

Kitty,

like I said there are 2 ssp. Both come from Mexico. The difference in the ssp is how the radial leaf complex comes off of the stem.

It was in the high-30's to low 40's in the area my trader lived in when she had them going dormant.

Look on the International Aroid page at "The Anthurium Species" thingie that has all the photos...they have pics of both ssp.

I have 2 other anthuriums that are radial, podophyllum and polydactylon. Both are hard to locate but I am not certain I'd go so far as to say they are 'rare'. Supposedly pedatoradiatun is rather rare.

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XYZ

MF:

I agree with Mike that this sp. can be temperamental in cultivation. Unlike most anthuria, these originate from low elevation tropical wet forests, where they grow on limestone. Obviously, one of the tricks to growing it well is to provide them with very sharp drainage. Some people read that it's terrestrial and proceed to drop them in soil, etc. Not good. Like A. podophyllum, they appear to thrive when their feet are dry and they are kept warm and shady.

Over much of its range, it is often found growing alongside Anthurium clarinervium and several other distinctive aroids.

Here are a few pics taken in the wild in Guatemala near the Lacandón forest reserve on the opposite side of the border in Chiapas. Not terribly rare where it occurs, but it is localized in its distribution in both countries.

Anthuriumpedatoradiatumwildgroup.jpg

Anthuriumpedatoradiatumcloseup.jpg

Good luck,

SJ

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metalfan

You see, that's why I like this forum...there's always someone who actually KNOWS!!!

So, I should maybe dig out a hole in the ground in the GH, and fill it with lava rock?? Plant in that? Or maybe Aliflor??

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metalfan

These are the other 2 that superficially resemble A. pedatoradiatum...

First one is A. Podophyllum, which the literature I read said it is at times mistaken for

DSCN5389.jpg

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metalfan

And this is A. polydactylon, which I read could be trained to be epiphytic, so I am training it to grow up the totem you see in the picture, an dit has responded very well to this

DSCN5387.jpg

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metalfan

WOW! Nicely grown! I hope mine gets that big!!!!

Even though its not supposed to do well in soil, both mine are growing well. We will see!

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XYZ

Gene:

Nice stuff. Last two pics are pedato hybrids with ??? As you probably know, well-grown F1 progeny of anthurium hybrids often greatly exceed the size of their parents. ALL of the southern Mexican anthuriums in cultivation hybridize readily. A very nice cross that is seen on the market sometimes is clarinervium x pedato, that also occurs in nature.

Jay

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