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Keys6505

Unhappy Lisa

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Keys6505

I bought this Lisa on PT last year.  It came in perfect condition, I let it acclimate in the pot a little and then planted it out.  This is the wettest corner of my yard, but about 10' in 1 direction there's a L. Chinensis and Arenga Englerii that are fine and 10' the other way is a Bizzie and my neighbors S. Mexicana that show no issues (I know, a lot of trees in one area).   My question is, could it be the wet ground that's upsetting her, or something else?  Has never held more than the 1-2 leaves at a time like it is now.  Since she was originally a potted tree is there any better chance of relocating her than a ground-grown Sabal?  I may be moving at some point so I'd probably just return her to potted life for now if the wet ground is the issue.

20220508_151711.jpg

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Swolte

How long has it been in the ground (since you moved it from a pot)? Were the roots disturbed?

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Collectorpalms

It looks sunburned and maybe planted too deeply. If it is already rooted in, then you can't move it without probably killing a small sabal. Maybe it is just finicky because its a mutation. Wet soil can cause nutrient issues. I have two in pots that are doing o.k.

Edited by Collectorpalms
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Keys6505
8 hours ago, Swolte said:

How long has it been in the ground (since you moved it from a pot)? Were the roots disturbed?

I got it almost exactly a year ago and then gave it a month or so to acclimate, so I'd say 10-11 months in ground.  No, I was careful about not disturbing the root ball because I know the Sabals are sensitive at this size.

 

6 hours ago, Collectorpalms said:

It looks sunburned and maybe planted too deeply. If it is already rooted in, then you can't move it without probably killing a small sabal. Maybe it is just finicky because its a mutation. Wet soil can cause nutrient issues. I have two in pots that are doing o.k.

Sunburn is what I had originally thought, but all the dead stuff you see was new growth from after planting.  Sunburn shouldn't affect new growth that came after it was planted in full sun, should it?  Do you think the fact that the root ball was pot-bound 10 months ago would make removal any easier than if it started life out in the ground?

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D. Morrowii

Not sure if it applies here but stuff that I had sitting in full winter/early spring sun without showing any damage recently started getting a little crispy with the wind, lower humidity and higher temps. In my experience (limited) palm leaves that withstood full all day sun a couple of months ago can start showing damage as the sun and heat intensify. It might be worth giving it a partial day sun break and extra water. Not sure thats you're problem but thats what I would look at. Good luck!

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Allen

Too much Fertilizer?

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PalmatierMeg

Looks neglected/ignored, i.e., planted too deep, not mulched and beleaguered by weeds. I said a few days ago and repeat, even here in FL I grow my Sabals in pots for a year or two to 3g size before planting. I never plant a small strap leaf seedling in the ground. I never stick it in the ground and walk away. I dig and prepare a proper planting hole, carefully place the palm so it's not too deep or too shallow. I clear away all grass & weeds in a 2-3' circle around, water it in, then apply a layer of mulch.

If this were a garden variety S. palmetto I would say compost it. But it's a rare Sabal Lisa and worth. trying to save. You could trench it over a period of weeks. But if you repot it all at once make sure to dig the largest, deepest rootball you can to avoid shattering the saxophone stem. Pot in a deep pot with a well draining mix and give it lots of time to establish itself. When you move to your new residence don't be in a rush to stick it back in the ground. Give it a year or two to grow up, maybe put out adult leaves. When you plant, prepare the site, then plant at the same level as the soil in its pot. Clear and mulch a circle around the palm.

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Bigfish

Sabal ‘Lisa’ seems to have more nutrient deficiency issues than regular S. palmetto.  Have you fertilized it this year?  I would give it a good shot of feed, making sure that it’s a fertilizer with plenty of K, Mg, Mn, and micros.

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tlow

I'm wondering if we got these from the same place, but if so, I received two recently and one didn't look all that great.  Planted it, and spear pulled after it dried out, but the petioles forming the young trunk are green and look OK.  I pulled it, put it into a pot because I needed something big in this spot now, and peroxide really makes it foam like crazy so there is something going on.  Peroxide, water, fertilizer, and patience.  I would be willing to bet this one will pull through just fine.  You'll likely be set back the next few months though.  Same as me.

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