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Sandy Loam

fastest screening palms

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Sandy Loam

I'm looking for some sort of palm or other vegetation that will screen out views up to a height of perhaps twelve feet or so. Even higher is fine.  The classic hedge/screening palm in coastal central Florida,USA is the areca palm. Yet, how quickly does that type of palm grow? Should I be considering something else instead? I don't want to wait 10 years for those small 3 gallon areca palms to turn into a true screening hedge. At the same time, I don't want to pay more money for huge 25 gallon pots.

I would consider a fast-growing fucus hedge instead,  but I have heard that the roots are terribly invasive.

Any suggestions or thoughts? Thank you.

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Sandy Loam

PS. I am not interested using screening bamboo.

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kinzyjr
32 minutes ago, Sandy Loam said:

I'm looking for some sort of palm or other vegetation that will screen out views up to a height of perhaps twelve feet or so. Even higher is fine.  The classic hedge/screening palm in coastal central Florida,USA is the areca palm. Yet, how quickly does that type of palm grow? Should I be considering something else instead? I don't want to wait 10 years for those small 3 gallon areca palms to turn into a true screening hedge. At the same time, I don't want to pay more money for huge 25 gallon pots.

I would consider a fast-growing fucus hedge instead,  but I have heard that the roots are terribly invasive.

Any suggestions or thoughts? Thank you.

Dypsis lutescens would be a bit of a stretch.  There were clumps burned to the ground in the rural area between here and Tampa this year.  The Zephyrhills Airport (KZPH) recorded 24F for a January minimum temperature, with a few more nights in the high 20s.  Since Plant City Municipal (KPCM) recorded a January minimum of 32F, I'd say that area was probably closer to what Zephyrhills recorded.

If you want a good hardy privacy screen, I'd recommend podocarpus.  It's very hardy and mine that were planted only a few years ago to screen in my coconut bed are already approaching 15 feet tall.  Not a palm, but at least a suggestion.  They do a good job of mitigating winter wind as well as blocking views.

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Sandy Loam

I'm talking about Volusia County right on the beach - - well, just one street away from the beach, so basically on it.  There are old Dypsis lutescens there. 

You are talking about inland places which get colder, like plant city.  Yeah, Zephyrhills and dade city get really cold (even more than plant city), but that is not the same climate to where the privacy screen would be planted.

So, how fast does Dypsis lutescens grow? 

Thanks. 

 

 

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JohnAndSancho
1 hour ago, Sandy Loam said:

I'm talking about Volusia County right on the beach - - well, just one street away from the beach, so basically on it.  There are old Dypsis lutescens there. 

You are talking about inland places which get colder, like plant city.  Yeah, Zephyrhills and dade city get really cold (even more than plant city), but that is not the same climate to where the privacy screen would be planted.

So, how fast does Dypsis lutescens grow? 

Thanks. 

 

 

Not fast enough to make you happy. 

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Gottagrowemall

Arecas grow slow. I planted 2 from a 7 gallon 2 years ago and they’re definitely taller and wider but if I was using them for privacy I’d be heavily disappointed. I sell clumping bamboo mostly graceful for people who want fast screening but since you’re not interested in that here are some options,

sea grapes, viburnum, bird of paradise white (still a bit slow), 

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Christopher Dillman

Might want to check out Arborvitae. Hardy enough for full sun here in SoCal.

I had this fantasy of lady palm screens in my zone, alas they require shade. :(

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Sandy Loam

Thanks all.  There are some interesting suggestions here. 

 

Chris, I will check out arbitvitae.  Here, lady palms (rhapis exelsa) can be grown in full sun too because of our humid  climate (unlike the California or Arizona desert), but they are simply too slow and short to form an effective screening hedge.

 

Gotta Grow Mall, how fast is seagrape? I have seen a lot of full seagrape hedges down in south Florida and - - wow -- they look fantastic, but it is rare to see that in Central Florida. Maybe it's worth a try???

 

What do you all think of a clusia rosea (or clusia guttufera) hedge, or perhaps even a copperleaf hedge?   Are they fast-growing? Those are common tall hedges down in South Florida, but not in central Florida.  

 

Also, what do you think of growing a Ficus hedge anywhere in coastal central Florida? I see those hedges everywhere in South Florida and sometimes in coastal SW FL from Sarasota southward to Naples, but I don't really see those being grown in Central Florida.  If they were a possibility near the beach, which type?... Ficus nituda?... or the other one?..... or are they simple too root-invasive? I have heard about fucus roots invading pipes, damaging swimming pools, creeping into the cracks in house foundations, etc, but I don't know whether any of that is true.  If it were true, then why does every house in coastal Palm Beach, FL have a giant 14-foot fucus hedge?

 

I have also grown a livistona chinensis (Chinese fan palm) screening wall before from dwarf multi-trunk cluster pots  (lots of fan leaves), but eventually they get to the point of having short, fat trunks and can no longer serve their screening purpose without taking up too much space or encroaching on a neighbour's fence.  Also, the Volusia property does not have the wet clay soil that my other place had (wet clay is much loved by Chinese fan palms, so they were pushing up 12 - 14 foot high fan leaves after about five years from 3 gallon pots, only if grown in full sun).

 

I read your Viburnum suggestion as well. Several of my sweet viburnum have caught botryspora fungus at a different property, so I am reluctant.  Maybe it is because of the clay soil on that other property (?)  However, yes, they can become a screening hedge very quickly if grown in sun.  My viburnum awabuki have not caught the fungus and are more exotic looking, but they do not seem to grow nearly as fast either.  

 

Yeah, GottaGrowMall, I had three clumps of big cane bamboo at a different property and they absolutely grew like wildfire to the point of being out of control. However,  they were growing in wet clay soil,  in a rain-collecting spot and in full sun, so there was no way to slow them down in those conditions.  AMaybe I should consider a skinny cane bamboo that won't be so aggressive,  especially when growing in beach sand.  Can you recommend one type in particular that would fit the bill?

 

Thanks everyone. Please keep the advice coming! I do appreciate it. Sorry that this post is so long.

 

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kinzyjr
14 hours ago, Sandy Loam said:

I'm talking about Volusia County right on the beach - - well, just one street away from the beach, so basically on it.  There are old Dypsis lutescens there. 

You are talking about inland places which get colder, like plant city.  Yeah, Zephyrhills and dade city get really cold (even more than plant city), but that is not the same climate to where the privacy screen would be planted.

So, how fast does Dypsis lutescens grow? 

Thanks.

That makes a big difference.

Dypsis lutescens grows like a weed here once it gets a rootball.  As seedlings, they sit still for way too long.  Starting from a 2G or 3G, you're probably talking 4-5 years min. for a tall 12' hedge with typical or above average winters and an aggressive watering and fertilizing regimen.  Be wary of radiational freezes though.  A 2010-style freeze can put you back at the rootball.

For a demonstration of 4 years of growth, here is a house on Cleveland Heights Blvd in Lakeland that is using them as hedges:

May 2011:

202205011345_Dypsis_lutescens_May2011.jpg

August 2015:

202205011345_Dypsis_lutescens_Aug2015.jpg

The sea grapes typically do well on the Atlantic coast.  If you get the 2G or 3G plants at one of the home improvement centers, you'll have a pretty good sized hedge in only a few growing seasons.  The do require some maintenance to keep in check for a more formal landscape.

I have to whack mine back twice a growing season to keep them from taking over the garden beds and have given away a few dozen volunteers.

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aabell

I was going to suggest Clusia, they seem very fast growing and one of the go-to large hedging options here. I don't know how hardy they are, seagrapes need a very solid zone 10, possibly Clusia is a bit tougher.  Has a nice tropical Ficus-like look without some of the downsides that come with Ficus. Are they used at all in Lakeland @kinzyjr?

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Brian M

My neighbors yard has lots of screening plants aka overgrown jungle. But along part of the property line they do have a mix of rhapis excelsa, fire bush, angels trumpet, shell ginger, loquat trees, and a bunch of other small stuff. 

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kinzyjr
38 minutes ago, aabell said:

I was going to suggest Clusia, they seem very fast growing and one of the go-to large hedging options here. I don't know how hardy they are, seagrapes need a very solid zone 10, possibly Clusia is a bit tougher.  Has a nice tropical Ficus-like look without some of the downsides that come with Ficus. Are they used at all in Lakeland @kinzyjr?

We have Clusia here.  I don't personally have any, but they have some large ones around town.  If I can remember where I saw them I'll take some photos next time.  I know Common Ground has a few of them, but they have only been in the ground a little while.

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Gottagrowemall

I always recommend graceful bamboo if you do clumping. It’s so easy to maintain. No low branching, grows like a V straight up and down. It’s the best for smaller yards and areas. I sell it if you’re interested pm me. 
 

multiplex is super bushy but gets too wild for most people. 

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Merlyn

Interesting, I thought Clusia was less hardy than seagrapes!  My several clusters of sea grapes got burnt to the ground at 24F in the backyard, and 26-28F in the front yard.  So if your local temps drop down there regularly it won't make a good privacy hedge.  It is fast growing though, going from roots to 8' tall in one summer at my house.  The sea grapes took mild to moderate damage with frost around 30-35F.  If your temps maybe hit freezing once a year then sea grapes would be an awesome hedge, and obviously very tolerant of salt air.  I'll have to try out Clusia in the slightly warmer front yard. :)

I have had a couple of Viburnum randomly die, but out of about 325 linear feet of Viburnum hedge I've only had to replant 3 of them.  I am in very sandy soil, which might make a difference.

With Lutescens/Areca mine get torched with any temps under about 28F.  They grow back, but a 10' cluster 8' diameter is now about 5' tall and sparse...and it'll be the end of the summer before it looks good again.  If you don't go under 30F and don't have significant frosts it'll be a great long-term solution. 

The Textilis type bamboozles are good tight clumpers at the ground.  The problem is that the taller ones are bare near the ground, maybe 4-8' depending on the variety.  So at low heights you can see right through a clump.  Gracilis is better than the bigger Textilis, but pretty sparsely branched down low. 

Asian Lemon is a fast grower and maxes out around 20-25' and maintains good low branching for privacy.  A single culm 3g pot I planted in February 2020 is now a 6' diameter clump at ground level and 20' tall with dense leaves.  And that's after I took off 3 big chunks to divide into other plantings around the yard.  It took zero damage at 24-26F. 

Bambusa Maligensis (Seabreeze) is a fast growing tight clumper that'll get 30+ feet with dense culms and decent lower branching.  But it gets big FAST and might be in the too-big-too-fast area for you.

For an ornamental mix to a hedgeline you could add Bambusa Suberecta "Jesse Durko"  with nice variegated leaves and moderately small at 20-25' max.

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chinandega81

I bought a clump of 2 foot tall arecas 2 years ago. They are now 6 feet tall. I am not sure why people say they are slow growing...I was thinking to slow down on the watering to make them less happy and to grow slower, because they grow VERY fast. I think when they are 10 years old or older, they lose some appeal, at least here in South Florida as they become very large and leggy and the clump turns into a mound. I find them most attractive when young and robust with lower crowns though.


Regardless, assuming you buy a large clump that's about 5 or 6 feet tall, like what Home Depot sells, and water and fertilize generously, they will serve the purpose you want within 2 years. The more water and fertilizer, the better. Obviously if your lows get into the 20s, they will burn back and that will delay them maturing. But they certainly aren't slow growing in full sun under those conditions.

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Sandy Loam
4 hours ago, Gottagrowemall said:

I always recommend graceful bamboo if you do clumping. It’s so easy to maintain. No low branching, grows like a V straight up and down. It’s the best for smaller yards and areas. I sell it if you’re interested pm me. 
 

multiplex is super bushy but gets too wild for most people. 

Do you mean bambusa textilis gracilis? Those are medium canes, aren't they?.... Perhaps an inch or more thick? They aren't super fine like "hedge bamboo" or Alphonse Carr bamboo, right? ..... Also, will bamboo look bad in beach sand?  It looked amazing in my wet soggy clay soil, but I just couldn't keep it in check there, so all of my former clumps eventually met their fate with a stump grinder. 

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Sandy Loam
2 hours ago, Merlyn said:

Interesting, I thought Clusia was less hardy than seagrapes!  My several clusters of sea grapes got burnt to the ground at 24F in the backyard, and 26-28F in the front yard.  So if your local temps drop down there regularly it won't make a good privacy hedge.  It is fast growing though, going from roots to 8' tall in one summer at my house.  The sea grapes took mild to moderate damage with frost around 30-35F.  If your temps maybe hit freezing once a year then sea grapes would be an awesome hedge, and obviously very tolerant of salt air.  I'll have to try out Clusia in the slightly warmer front yard. :)

I have had a couple of Viburnum randomly die, but out of about 325 linear feet of Viburnum hedge I've only had to replant 3 of them.  I am in very sandy soil, which might make a difference.

With Lutescens/Areca mine get torched with any temps under about 28F.  They grow back, but a 10' cluster 8' diameter is now about 5' tall and sparse...and it'll be the end of the summer before it looks good again.  If you don't go under 30F and don't have significant frosts it'll be a great long-term solution. 

The Textilis type bamboozles are good tight clumpers at the ground.  The problem is that the taller ones are bare near the ground, maybe 4-8' depending on the variety.  So at low heights you can see right through a clump.  Gracilis is better than the bigger Textilis, but pretty sparsely branched down low. 

Asian Lemon is a fast grower and maxes out around 20-25' and maintains good low branching for privacy.  A single culm 3g pot I planted in February 2020 is now a 6' diameter clump at ground level and 20' tall with dense leaves.  And that's after I took off 3 big chunks to divide into other plantings around the yard.  It took zero damage at 24-26F. 

Bambusa Maligensis (Seabreeze) is a fast growing tight clumper that'll get 30+ feet with dense culms and decent lower branching.  But it gets big FAST and might be in the too-big-too-fast area for you.

For an ornamental mix to a hedgeline you could add Bambusa Suberecta "Jesse Durko"  with nice variegated leaves and moderately small at 20-25' max.

Thank you! I had bambusa malingensis at a different property and it became huge fast - - out of control.  That type of cane is way too thick for what I am looking for anyways.  Someone else suggested multiplex bamboo which, if I am not mistaken, would stay small with fine canes and, therefore, less likely to take over the yard.  Yet, it would still provide screening (I hope) because it is leafy - - right? Thanks. 

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Sandy Loam
8 hours ago, Brian M said:

My neighbors yard has lots of screening plants aka overgrown jungle. But along part of the property line they do have a mix of rhapis excelsa, fire bush, angels trumpet, shell ginger, loquat trees, and a bunch of other small stuff. 

Thanks Brian.  I did not know that Firebush provided year-round screening up in your location. I just clicked your profile and it said Jacksonville Beach. In that region, do they stay evergreen year round and constantly blooming too? I would never have thought of Firebush, but it has piqued my curiosity.  IFAS might be wrong about its hardiness in north Florida: 

https://gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/plants/ornamentals/firebush.html#:~:text=Firebush is a perennial or semi-woody shrub that,including the zebra longwing and gulf fritillary butterflies.

 

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Sandy Loam

Wow. Thanks to everyone for your amazing suggestions! I really appreciate it. 

I also have seen many large and colourful ixora hedges in South Florida, but I don't recall seeing them as giant hedges in central Florida.  Do they get as big in central Florida?.... And are they fast growers? 

 

As for copperleaf, I have seen many of them around central Florida, but never as giant hedges (common in South Florida). Would they grow to that size in Central Florida, and quickly? 

 

I suppose a hibiscus hedge could also work, but the blooms just get chopped off whenever it is trimmed, so.... 

 

Thanks! 

  

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spike

Hmm, if not for the trellis cost I'd think some kind of vine would be great. 

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Gottagrowemall
6 hours ago, Sandy Loam said:

Do you mean bambusa textilis gracilis? Those are medium canes, aren't they?.... Perhaps an inch or more thick? They aren't super fine like "hedge bamboo" or Alphonse Carr bamboo, right? ..... Also, will bamboo look bad in beach sand?  It looked amazing in my wet soggy clay soil, but I just couldn't keep it in check there, so all of my former clumps eventually met their fate with a stump grinder. 

Yes that’s the one. It won’t look as good in sandy soil, but if you mulch it in or amend the soil with some black kow it’ll change that. You’re right though bamboo really only looks it’s best when it’s getting lots of water.

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Stelios

Acoelorrhaphe wrightii. If it's a bit slow to grow you can combine them with some bananas that they should grow faster. Even some fast growing tropical looking vines if you have a support to grow on to, maybe passion fruit.

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Merlyn
9 hours ago, Sandy Loam said:

Thank you! I had bambusa malingensis at a different property and it became huge fast - - out of control.  That type of cane is way too thick for what I am looking for anyways.  Someone else suggested multiplex bamboo which, if I am not mistaken, would stay small with fine canes and, therefore, less likely to take over the yard.  Yet, it would still provide screening (I hope) because it is leafy - - right? Thanks. 

Yeah, of the ~22 bamboozles I have planted, Maligensis is the fastest and most likely to get WAAAAAAY out of control.  Textilis Gracilis is about 20-25' tall and maximum of about 1.25" diameter culms.  If you like the fine culm ones, it's a good choice.  There's also Multiplex "Golden Goddess" which is supposed to get only 6-12' tall and 0.25" diameter culms.  Bambusa "New Guinea Black" is supposed to be a smaller Lako, at 20' and 1" diameter.  You could shop around the descriptions at Tropical Bamboo, there are other short/small diameter types available.  Probably half of my collection is from them, bought as 3g mailorder.  I amend with compost as Gottagrowemall mentioned.

I've thought of doing copperleaf here, it might do okay if you don't get heavy freezes.  I don't think it'll grow over 10' tall, but probably would make a good low-ish screen.

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DoomsDave

@Sandy Loam hmm. Do you know if Rhapis humilis will grow over your way? If it does, it's faster and taller than Rhapis excelsa. I have some that are about 8 feet tall that make a nice hedge, though they do get a bit invasive.

In any case, best of luck and show us what you do and what the results are. You'll add to our greater body of  knowledge.

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Kim

What are you screening and how large is the open area available for planting? Sometimes tall narrow hedges are not the most effective screen, depending on the view you wish to block. From a design perspective, sometimes a single well-placed tree does a better job and is more attractive than a hedge. Can you provide a photo or describe the situation? 

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Merlyn

It occurred to me that there is an idea bamboo for your application - Bambusa Guangxiensis aka "Chinese Dwarf" or "Chinese Hedge."  I'm not sure if it's salt-tolerant, but it is super dense  with leaves and lower branches, fast growing up to around 15-20', and cold hardy down to around 28-30F.  It completely defoliated at 24F but is mostly regrown now.  Apparently it's easy to trim to as short as an 8' hedge, but I haven't tried it.  I'm using it to block a neighbor's 2nd story windows, and it took about 1 year to get good 12' tall coverage from a single 3g planting.

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Sandy Loam
7 hours ago, Stelios said:

Acoelorrhaphe wrightii. If it's a bit slow to grow you can combine them with some bananas that they should grow faster. Even some fast growing tropical looking vines if you have a support to grow on to, maybe passion fruit.

Ah yes -- the Everglades Palm!   I don't see those for sale very often.   Do they "screen" out neighbours all the way down to the ground?   They look like they might only screen out at the top of the foliage..   Also, it now appears that I will need something quite narrow (not a space taker) for screening, so I'm not sure what to do any more.  

 

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Sandy Loam
3 hours ago, DoomsDave said:

@Sandy Loam hmm. Do you know if Rhapis humilis will grow over your way? If it does, it's faster and taller than Rhapis excelsa. I have some that are about 8 feet tall that make a nice hedge, though they do get a bit invasive.

In any case, best of luck and show us what you do and what the results are. You'll add to our greater body of  knowledge.

Thanks DoomsDave.  Yes, I believe Rhapis Humilis grown here in Florida, but you'd have to go to a botanical garden to see them.   I don't recall seeing them for sale out here.  Rhapis Excelsa are pretty common out here, but I have found them to be slow at my other property.  Perhaps that is because they are growing in shade.  They are certainly leafy right to the ground, but it takes a while for them to get tall, doesn''t it?  ....and they never get to be 12-14 feet tall ever, right?  

If I were in California like you, I would simply use the classic California screening hedge:  Italian Cypress.  However, we simply can't grow those in Florida.  I have tried.  They absolutely hate the humidity and keep turning brown and often remain stunted.    Maybe they would work in the fine sandy soil at this other property, but they absolutely hated my wet, soggy, gooey clay soil at the Gainesville, FL house.   

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Sandy Loam
3 hours ago, Kim said:

What are you screening and how large is the open area available for planting? Sometimes tall narrow hedges are not the most effective screen, depending on the view you wish to block. From a design perspective, sometimes a single well-placed tree does a better job and is more attractive than a hedge. Can you provide a photo or describe the situation? 

The goal is to block out the view of neighbours on 3 sides.  I see now that the lot is not a big as I initially thought and I will have to plant something quite narrow to block out the views.  At the same time, I don't want to block out all of the sunshine either.   The houses are low (one storey) on two sides, but they house to the left is a large two-storey home.  I guess I will have to rule out wider hedges like seagrape and viburnum.   I might have to go with a skinny bamboo and just hope that it won't escape its rhizome barrier if I install one.  ..... this is going to be a tough decision.   

 

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Sandy Loam
2 hours ago, Merlyn said:

It occurred to me that there is an idea bamboo for your application - Bambusa Guangxiensis aka "Chinese Dwarf" or "Chinese Hedge."  I'm not sure if it's salt-tolerant, but it is super dense  with leaves and lower branches, fast growing up to around 15-20', and cold hardy down to around 28-30F.  It completely defoliated at 24F but is mostly regrown now.  Apparently it's easy to trim to as short as an 8' hedge, but I haven't tried it.  I'm using it to block a neighbor's 2nd story windows, and it took about 1 year to get good 12' tall coverage from a single 3g planting.

Wow,  thank you!   I will definitely look into this one, for sure.   Does it spread quickly enough to fill out the gaps between clumps in a few years?   Is it too aggressive to remain within it rhizome barrier?  The big clumping bamboos that I used to grow would never have stayed within a rhizome barrier.  They went too deep and were strong enough to move anything.  However, those really skinny bamboos are totally different, so....  Yes!  Bambusa Guangxiensis might actually respect a rhizome barrier. 

I looked up Bambusa Guangxiensis on the Tropical Bamboo website down in Loxahatchee, FL.  It looks really short, but apparently it quickly covered a 2nd storey neighbour for you, right?  If so, that's perfect.  What height will it max out at?  

 

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DoomsDave
2 hours ago, Sandy Loam said:

Thanks DoomsDave.  Yes, I believe Rhapis Humilis grown here in Florida, but you'd have to go to a botanical garden to see them.   I don't recall seeing them for sale out here.  Rhapis Excelsa are pretty common out here, but I have found them to be slow at my other property.  Perhaps that is because they are growing in shade.  They are certainly leafy right to the ground, but it takes a while for them to get tall, doesn''t it?  ....and they never get to be 12-14 feet tall ever, right?  

If I were in California like you, I would simply use the classic California screening hedge:  Italian Cypress.  However, we simply can't grow those in Florida.  I have tried.  They absolutely hate the humidity and keep turning brown and often remain stunted.    Maybe they would work in the fine sandy soil at this other property, but they absolutely hated my wet, soggy, gooey clay soil at the Gainesville, FL house.   

Okay, I wonder if there's an Italian cypress look alike that will make it for you? DON'T mess with Lombardy poplars! 

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Brian M
18 hours ago, Sandy Loam said:

Thanks Brian.  I did not know that Firebush provided year-round screening up in your location. I just clicked your profile and it said Jacksonville Beach. In that region, do they stay evergreen year round and constantly blooming too? I would never have thought of Firebush, but it has piqued my curiosity.  IFAS might be wrong about its hardiness in north Florida: 

https://gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/plants/ornamentals/firebush.html#:~:text=Firebush is a perennial or semi-woody shrub that,including the zebra longwing and gulf fritillary butterflies.

 

It was a voluntary plant so assuming there's more around here somewhere. It's not evergreen year round but it's already filling back in and blooming from the freeze. It's probably 6 or 7 ft tall. It popped up last year out of nowhere and hummingbirds loved it.

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Fishinsteeg234

I’ve seen rows of Monoon longifolium, or Mast tree’s lined up to make a good hedge. They would also be ideal for a tall, narrow spot to fill. 

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Sandy Loam
3 hours ago, Fishinsteeg234 said:

I’ve seen rows of Monoon longifolium, or Mast tree’s lined up to make a good hedge. They would also be ideal for a tall, narrow spot to fill. 

Wow. Thank you! Do the stay evergreen where you are located in Central Florida? 

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Fishinsteeg234
12 minutes ago, Sandy Loam said:

Wow. Thank you! Do the stay evergreen where you are located in Central Florida? 

Here is a row that was planted 1 year ago last spring in the Orlando area, zone 9b. This homeowner is attempting to create a privacy hedge along a very busy highway. Google street view is from this year 2022. They survived this past February, with lows close to 28-30 degrees in this area. No leaf drop is seen in these photos. Granted, these are all on the south side of a 5’ block wall for some protection. reading up on the mast tree, it says it’s a zone 10a tree, reaching heights of 30-40ft with 5-6ft width. I’m not sure how long it will take to fill the gaps still visible in this hedge, but it will be interesting to watch and see how it does in the upcoming years. You might be able to squeeze the spacing a bit tighter. I believe this tree is still quite rare in nurseries, I don’t see too many around yet.

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Palm Tree Jim

Perhaps these pictures can help you. This bamboo is used quite frequently here in Costa Rica as both hedges and privacy walls. They do require some maintenance every few weeks but do not produce runners from my experience.  The height is approximately 8 feet tall and they become very dense as well.

 

b1.jpg

b2.jpg

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Sandy Loam
3 hours ago, Palm Tree Jim said:

Perhaps these pictures can help you. This bamboo is used quite frequently here in Costa Rica as both hedges and privacy walls. They do require some maintenance every few weeks but do not produce runners from my experience.  The height is approximately 8 feet tall and they become very dense as well.

 

b1.jpg

b2.jpg

Wow. Nice! What is the name of that bamboo variety? Is it Bambusa Guangxiensis?  I love that it is so fine/thin that it likely does not even need a rhizome barrier to prevent spreading.  It is a clumping form, isn't it?  Lastly, how tall does it grow?  Will it screen out a second storey window?... Just one storey?  Thanks Jim. 

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Merlyn

My guess is that Palm Tree Jim's bamboo photos are a type of Textilis, but there are a lot of small-ish types that respond well to trimming. 

Here's my Guangxiensis, as you can see it's currently about 15-18' tall.  The culms are bigger and wider spaced at the base, so you can see through them near ground level.  This is partially because these were 100% defoliated at the end of January.  And partially because there's a hedge of Viburnum behind it, and white bird of paradise on either side.  So if you wanted a complete privacy block then a smaller and denser clumper at the base would be a better choice.  But last fall you couldn't even see the neighbor's house...

 

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The outline, of course, is the neighbor's roof.

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Merlyn

And this is the culm view of Asian Lemon, about a 2 year old clump that's been thinned out twice by transplanting sections of culms.  It was also a single 3g pot and is currently 4-5' diameter at ground level.  About a month ago I cut off every lower branch, because it keeps sending feelers out across my pathway.  As you can see, it just keeps regrowing low branches, and the culms alone are so dense that you can see through less than 5% of it.

546218279_20220503_120421BambusaAsianLemonculms.thumb.jpg.b3abbd9402845d58ced45936f727f367.jpg

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Palm Tree Jim
1 hour ago, Sandy Loam said:

Wow. Nice! What is the name of that bamboo variety? Is it Bambusa Guangxiensis?  I love that it is so fine/thin that it likely does not even need a rhizome barrier to prevent spreading.  It is a clumping form, isn't it?  Lastly, how tall does it grow?  Will it screen out a second storey window?... Just one storey?  Thanks Jim. 

Not sure on the type of bamboo but in the first picture the height is about 10 feet tall.  It does appear that they grow higher but I'm not sure how much. And it is a clumper without spreading out to much.  Tomorrow I will be at a nursery and will ask what type it is. They are very fast growers as well, at least here in Costa Rica.

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