Jump to content

Recommended Posts

K2HI

Can anyone ID this palm?  It is growing very well near Pacifica, California. My daughter and son in law just bought a house nearby and would love to plant one. I’ve informed them that if this is a date palm (what species/cultivar?) that this is probably a very old tree. I would like to get a positive ID on this as I think it is a magnificent, absolutely gorgeous palm!  I wish we could grow date palms here as we love dates, and date palms are really beautiful, but our collection of palms is growing fast. Mahalo nui loa for your help!

5D414C61-AD73-464B-BE55-E16705E7C9A0.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fusca
1 hour ago, K2HI said:

Can anyone ID this palm?  It is growing very well near Pacifica, California. My daughter and son in law just bought a house nearby and would love to plant one. I’ve informed them that if this is a date palm (what species/cultivar?) that this is probably a very old tree. I would like to get a positive ID on this as I think it is a magnificent, absolutely gorgeous palm!  I wish we could grow date palms here as we love dates, and date palms are really beautiful, but our collection of palms is growing fast. Mahalo nui loa for your help!

5D414C61-AD73-464B-BE55-E16705E7C9A0.jpeg

It's a Phoenix canariensis (Canary Island Date Palm) or possibly a hybrid with canariensis.  The dates are edible but taste terrible.

Jon

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
awkonradi

Here is another type of palm, which would thrive in Pacifica's cool climate, just in case you may be interested in some other options.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • Klmoon
      By Klmoon
      Please help identify this palm. I believe it is a Mexican Fan Palm but it has multiple trunks. Some have died after a freeze in Houston and I need to know what if anything can be done to save the remaining trunks. I have two different palms and both have more thank one trunk….







    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      I have been growing this unknown Chamaedorea for a number of years. It is a clumper with long, skinny stems and I suspect it belongs to a species of "bamboo palm" Chamaedoreas. My problem is I have trouble differentiating between species of bamboo palms. This little darling is a female and this year is loaded with green seeds. Right next to it is a (male?) hybrid Cham named after the late Dick Douglas, which I featured in another topic. Closely related Chamaedoreas sometimes hybridize but more distantly related species won't.
      Can someone tell me what species my clustering palm is? And also tell me whether it might be possible that my Douglas hybrid is male and might be the pollinator of my mystery palm's seeds?
      Mystery Chamaedorea with seeds

    • Bill H2DB
      By Bill H2DB
      This is on Craigslist , and I just wanted to share ......
      Good grief !   Or am I more out of touch than I have already thought that I am ...
      https://daytona.craigslist.org/grd/d/palm-coast-date-palm-tree/7491191991.html
       
    • treelover
      By treelover
      how to grow ajwa date from seed?
    • Tracy
      By Tracy
      I have been doing battle with a perennial that keeps coming back despite my best efforts to extract it.  It appears to be a bulb that keeps pushing out new leaves every year for several years now.  I try to extract it, but have never gotten down far enough to the source bulb or roots.  The reason is that it popped up adjacent to a prized plant that I don't want to damage.  That plant is an Encephalartos inopinus, so I've been reluctant to dig too deep.  This spring, I've let it get much bigger than normal before trying to remove it, and thought I would see what the flowers look like.  I removed the flowers so they don't go to seed in my garden to add more digging, but brought them into the house in a small container so my wife could appreciate them.  The flowers are very fragrant.
      Anyone recognize this plant and flowers?  The strap leafed plant next to my E inopinus along with flower photos, and perspective on the plant I don't want it to invade (E inopinus).





×
×
  • Create New...