Jump to content
KsLouisiana

Louisiana tropical landscape zone 9

Recommended Posts

KsLouisiana

Hey palm people! So we bought our house a little over a year ago here in Lake Charles, La zone 9.  And have been using the natural subtropical jungle feel of the area and putting a spin with different exotic things.  We get alot of rain and that helps but we have to struggle with some cold for a few months in the winter.  But I wanted to show off some of my favorite additions and if y'all have and tips of what we could ad that would be cool. Let me know what y'all think.

20220420_190554.jpg

20220420_184405.jpg

20220420_190606.jpg

20220420_190709.jpg

20220420_190725.jpg

20220420_190817.jpg

20220420_190933.jpg

20220420_190944.jpg

20220420_190840.jpg

20220420_190730.jpg

20220420_190802.jpg

  • Like 12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr

@KsLouisiana Wonderful house and property!  Looks like the landscaping is off to a solid start.  Bottlebrush, Sabal palmetto, Syagrus romanzoffiana, Washingtonia robusta, Butia odorata, Bismarckia nobilis, and Phoenix roebellenii with the tall hardwoods and pines isn't all that different than what you mostly see here in Central Florida.  A few suggestions for things to try might be the a few of the Chamaedoreas (mircrospadix, radicalis, cataractarum, and costaricana are my picks), Arenga engleri, and Rhapis excelsa.

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KsLouisiana
3 minutes ago, kinzyjr said:

@KsLouisiana Wonderful house and property!  Looks like the landscaping is off to a solid start.  Bottlebrush, Sabal palmetto, Syagrus romanzoffiana, Washingtonia robusta, Butia odorata, Bismarckia nobilis, and Phoenix roebellenii with the tall hardwoods and pines isn't all that different than what you mostly see here in Central Florida.  A few suggestions for things to try might be the a few of the Chamaedoreas (mircrospadix, radicalis, cataractarum, and costaricana are my picks), Arenga engleri, and Rhapis excelsa.

Thanks man! It's definitely not too far from that. I love that area and it's a big inspiration for my yard. So we've had alot of luck with the bismarckia doing good but have had trouble with queen palms. No idea why. They do great around here. We also planted more live oaks, cypress, pines, and citrus. I appreciate the advice. I will definitely give those a look!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KsLouisiana

Had to show off Kip since he enjoys the yard as much as anyone 

20220420_192845.jpg

20220420_192917.jpg

20220420_192753.jpg

20220420_192820.jpg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr
11 minutes ago, KsLouisiana said:

Thanks man! It's definitely not too far from that. I love that area and it's a big inspiration for my yard. So we've had alot of luck with the bismarckia doing good but have had trouble with queen palms. No idea why. They do great around here. We also planted more live oaks, cypress, pines, and citrus. I appreciate the advice. I will definitely give those a look!

Welcome!  Another Central Florida hardy favorite would be the Livistona genus.  In particular, Livistona chinensis and Livistona decora would probably do well.  If you're looking for a crownshaft palm to try under canopy, give Archontophoenix cunninghamiana a roll of the dice.  Queen palms are like that since they tend to be nutrient hogs.  How does Chamaerops humilis do there?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OC2Texaspalmlvr
30 minutes ago, kinzyjr said:

A few suggestions for things to try might be the a few of the Chamaedoreas (mircrospadix, radicalis, cataractarum, and costaricana are my picks), Arenga engleri, and Rhapis excelsa.

Kinzyjr is spot on with these suggestions. I'll plant 2 bizzies to every queen I might even think about planting =) Also any of the Butia hybrids from Patric should be tried !!! 

T J 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KsLouisiana
11 minutes ago, kinzyjr said:

Welcome!  Another Central Florida hardy favorite would be the Livistona genus.  In particular, Livistona chinensis and Livistona decora would probably do well.  If you're looking for a crownshaft palm to try under canopy, give Archontophoenix cunninghamiana a roll of the dice.  Queen palms are like that since they tend to be nutrient hogs.  How does Chamaerops humilis do there?

Okay I forgot those. I have 2 small Livistona Chinensis that I planted on the edge of the woods in shady areas. I see them doing great around town. So I'm excited to watch it all grow this summer. I also have a Cunninghamiana in a pot that I will plant when it gets bigger. I also planted a Chamaerops humilis just a month ago. They all seem to grow great here

20220213_105743.jpg

20210824_191204.jpg

16505037564823248954370751903882.jpg

16505037751583010988105822574298.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tropicdoc
18 hours ago, kinzyjr said:

@KsLouisiana Wonderful house and property!  Looks like the landscaping is off to a solid start.  Bottlebrush, Sabal palmetto, Syagrus romanzoffiana, Washingtonia robusta, Butia odorata, Bismarckia nobilis, and Phoenix roebellenii with the tall hardwoods and pines isn't all that different than what you mostly see here in Central Florida.  A few suggestions for things to try might be the a few of the Chamaedoreas (mircrospadix, radicalis, cataractarum, and costaricana are my picks), Arenga engleri, and Rhapis excelsa.

Agreed. I am in Houma and have these species in a jungle area under a large live oak. They do well, I have Trachycarpus martianus which is also cool and looks nicer than fortunei IMO. Rhapis is spreading pretty good from a potted plant. Plant some golden pothos to climb the tree in summer for instant tropical look. They should come back every spring. I have a Sabal bermudana which is doing great also. Looks a bit nicer than palmetto.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
amh

You are off to a great start. Anything in the Sabal genus with the various hardy Chamaedoreas mentioned earlier will work. Various cold hardy cycads will look good too. Non palm natives that will add to a tropical look are Passiflora incarnataAsimina triloba, and Asimina parviflora.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dartolution

@KsLouisiana Good looking start!
If you like tropical gardening consider incorporating various hardy gingers like Hedychium, Alpinia, and Curcumas ... can't go wrong there! 

Also - don't forget elephant ears - colocasia come in many cultivars with colors and patterns to choose from. Should love the rainfall over there as long as you feed them! 

:) 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KsLouisiana
8 hours ago, Tropicdoc said:

Agreed. I am in Houma and have these species in a jungle area under a large live oak. They do well, I have Trachycarpus martianus which is also cool and looks nicer than fortunei IMO. Rhapis is spreading pretty good from a potted plant. Plant some golden pothos to climb the tree in summer for instant tropical look. They should come back every spring. I have a Sabal bermudana which is doing great also. Looks a bit nicer than palmetto.

Awesome.  Thanks for the advice. I was thinking about putting a pothos on that big oak tree. I see them around and looking good. And I will for sure look into a sabal bermudana. I planted a sabal causiarium last year and the leaves all frozen at 26 degrees. That was a bit surprising. It's pretty small though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KsLouisiana
7 hours ago, amh said:

You are off to a great start. Anything in the Sabal genus with the various hardy Chamaedoreas mentioned earlier will work. Various cold hardy cycads will look good too. Non palm natives that will add to a tropical look are Passiflora incarnataAsimina triloba, and Asimina parviflora.

Thank ya. I have a sago palm that I found on the road that someone was throwing away... that's doing great but I'm not sure what other kinds of cycads would do well here.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xenon
2 minutes ago, KsLouisiana said:

Awesome.  Thanks for the advice. I was thinking about putting a pothos on that big oak tree. I see them around and looking good. And I will for sure look into a sabal bermudana. I planted a sabal causiarium last year and the leaves all frozen at 26 degrees. That was a bit surprising. It's pretty small though.

Better yet, get a Monstera deliciosa! It's slightly hardier and the leaves will get huuuugeee. 100% root hardy too 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KsLouisiana
7 hours ago, Dartolution said:

@KsLouisiana Good looking start!
If you like tropical gardening consider incorporating various hardy gingers like Hedychium, Alpinia, and Curcumas ... can't go wrong there! 

Also - don't forget elephant ears - colocasia come in many cultivars with colors and patterns to choose from. Should love the rainfall over there as long as you feed them! 

:) 

Lots of good info. Gingers definitely will be a great addition.  There are some green gingers around town that stay looking good all winter. I definitely need to track some down.  We have elephant ears that grow in the ditches here and they're great but I need to plant some giant one. Thanks man

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dartolution

@KsLouisiana Thats very surprising about the causiarum. I have seedlings in 4" pots on the patio that got down to 19F this past winter here. Only 1 of the 6 defoliated. The others stayed green and had no issue. I've since given most away but kept a couple for myself to plant one day. 

It seems that there is a good bit of variability in cold hardiness with some being defoliated or killed, others not really caring, and some showing intermediate signs of cold damage. 

 

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Centraltxpalm

Many causiarum are mislabeled as domingensis which isnt as hardy

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joe NC
10 hours ago, KsLouisiana said:
18 hours ago, Dartolution said:

@KsLouisiana Good looking start!
If you like tropical gardening consider incorporating various hardy gingers like Hedychium, Alpinia, and Curcumas ... can't go wrong there! 

Also - don't forget elephant ears - colocasia come in many cultivars with colors and patterns to choose from. Should love the rainfall over there as long as you feed them! 

:) 

Lots of good info. Gingers definitely will be a great addition.  There are some green gingers around town that stay looking good all winter. I definitely need to track some down.  We have elephant ears that grow in the ditches here and they're great but I need to plant some giant one. Thanks man

If you cant easily find any of the purely ornamental gingers, standard grocery store ginger is a decent tropical feeling plant.  Also... Asian markets and higher end grocery stores are a good source of turmeric and even galangal roots to grow. 

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
amh
14 hours ago, KsLouisiana said:

Thank ya. I have a sago palm that I found on the road that someone was throwing away... that's doing great but I'm not sure what other kinds of cycads would do well here.

Dioon edule, Cycas taitungensis, Cycas panzhihuaensis, Cycas debaoensis, Cycas guizhouensis, hybrids, Macrozamia communis, Zamia floridana, Zamia angustifoloa, Ceratozamia hildae, Ceratozamia kuesteriana, and probably a lot more. Getting into cycads, like palms can lead to obsession, so be warned.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KsLouisiana
On 4/22/2022 at 9:39 AM, Centraltxpalm said:

Many causiarum are mislabeled as domingensis which isnt as hardy

I was wondering if that was the case :/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KsLouisiana
On 4/22/2022 at 9:29 AM, Dartolution said:

@KsLouisiana Thats very surprising about the causiarum. I have seedlings in 4" pots on the patio that got down to 19F this past winter here. Only 1 of the 6 defoliated. The others stayed green and had no issue. I've since given most away but kept a couple for myself to plant one day. 

It seems that there is a good bit of variability in cold hardiness with some being defoliated or killed, others not really caring, and some showing intermediate signs of cold damage. 

 

Thanks for the info. I'm just going to let it get bigger and hopefully one day ot will be tougher and make it through a little bit of cold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KsLouisiana

Thank y'all for all your great advice and help. Today we're working on the landscape adding some plumbago and oleander....maybe some agapanthus.  I have another question. So we planted a sabal palm last October and it has a couple leaves on it. I was wondering if now would be an appropriate time to fertilize it or if I should hold off a while? What would y'all do?

20220424_085428.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dartolution

I see no reason why not to go ahead and apply a fertilizer. Nutrient uptake is highest at the newest roots, so applying a good palm fertilizer a little out from the base and watering thoroughly will likely aid in recovery. Just my 2-cents. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ZPalms

I can't remember if you updated it or not but did that sabal you pulled from a ditch ever survive?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Little Tex
24 minutes ago, ZPalms said:

I can't remember if you updated it or not but did that sabal you pulled from a ditch ever survive?

its the last photo in the first post

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ZPalms
2 minutes ago, Little Tex said:

its the last photo in the first post

Oh wow thanks! It really made a recovery, I didn't even recognize it! Love to see it! :D

Edited by ZPalms
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KsLouisiana
On 4/24/2022 at 9:37 PM, Dartolution said:

I see no reason why not to go ahead and apply a fertilizer. Nutrient uptake is highest at the newest roots, so applying a good palm fertilizer a little out from the base and watering thoroughly will likely aid in recovery. Just my 2-cents. 

Awesome! Will do. Thanks for the tips man!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • teddytn
      By teddytn
      Dwarf sabal minor, 19” tall. There’s 4 flower stalks at various stages of development Sabal minor mccurtain, first time flowering. I can stand on the upper bed to the left and the flower stalk is over my head, it’s easily 8’ tall now. 2 flower stalks Sabal Birmingham 3rd year flowering, 3 flower stalks, same every year so far always 3
    • DreaminAboutPalms
      By DreaminAboutPalms
      I germinated a pair of Sabal Bermudana seeds about one month ago (first pic is from May 1) and sowed then after and have had them covered to keep moisture in and on a heat mat. Still haven’t seen anything pop up above surface of soil yet and I’m wondering if they might be dead or are just really slow 


    • GoatLockerGuns
      By GoatLockerGuns
      I have a plethera of extra germinated Sabal sp. 'Praha' seeds to give away.  I had near 100% germination from the seeds I collected at the Praha, Texas site back in late February.  If you are not familiar with the ongoing Sabal sp. 'Praha' discussion, see the Palmtalk thread below:
      The extra germinated seeds I have are from the palm I labeled Sabal sp. 'Praha' #5 in the aforementioned post.  It is the palm currently thought to be the oldest at the Praha site by most who visit there (the rest are probably volunteers).  Reports of these palms in the Praha area go back to the 19th century.  In a nutshell, there is some mystery regarding what species of Sabal these palms actually are.  The seeds produced are too small to be Sabal mexicana, and larger than most Sabal palmetto specimens.  I am willing to ship for free to the lower 48; just agree to give them a good home.  PM me if interested (first come, first serve).
    • teddytn
      By teddytn
      This may seem odd. Everyone pushes the envelope with the palms they plant, like how far north can you grow a coconut palm etc. What about the opposite? If I moved to Hawaii of course I would jump both feet in with all the tropical palms I could get my hands on, but I would definitely plant all the cold hardy palms I’m a fan of now too. To me it would be cool to watch the growth rate of a cold hardy palm in a tropical environment. Anyone have sabal minor, sabal palmetto growing in paradise? I would love to see pics!!!
    • Palmphile
      By Palmphile
      I am having trouble with differentiating between Sabal x brazoria and Sabal x texensis 'Brazoria' , can someone tell me what makes them different and how different they really are? (Or if they're the same?)
×
×
  • Create New...