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Parajubaea torallyi

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swamptreenelly

I potted up 16 of 32 Parajubaea tor. I bought from Ray Laub at Palm Patch Nursery in Northern California. I like the way the seeds look and that the Parajubaea will get large trunks. I hope they all make it in Union City, Ca.

My Parajubaea C. made it through 24 degrees two winters ago and is doing great. I have a bismarckia growing next to it and the bismarckia is starting to grow fast after 5 years in the ground in Newark, Ca.

The palm auctions at the Northern California Palm Soceity meetings have proved very beneficial to our collection.

I'm going to pot up some Phoenix rupicolas today. I might not see all these palms 50 years from now, but it is a nice feeling that some of them will make it. Future horticulturists will have some stuff to look at for sure.

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Jim in Los Altos

I potted up 16 of 32 Parajubaea tor. I bought from Ray Laub at Palm Patch Nursery in Northern California. I like the way the seeds look and that the Parajubaea will get large trunks. I hope they all make it in Union City, Ca.

Nelson,

You may already know it, but Ray Laub has closed the Palm Patch :angry: (property sold) and, as far as I know, moved to the Fallbrook area in SoCal where he will continue propagating palms. I miss him and his nursery up here.

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Exotic Life

Fantastic palm pictures! Thanks for sharing.

Robbin

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DoomsDave

Here's a baby I got at a local plant sale . . . .

post-208-1221101149_thumb.jpg

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DoomsDave

Nowhere near as grand as Gaston's, but I'm in love, and some day it will be grand . . ..

Look in post No. 117 and 118 to see HOW grand, in November, 2014.

post-208-1221101206_thumb.jpg

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DoomsDave

Smaller one, with the Shoe for scale.

post-208-1221101267_thumb.jpg

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Kostas

Great topic and with lots of :drool: pictures!!!!

Gaston,is there a chance we could see some big Parajubaea cocoides too? :) To cover the whole genus,you know :lol: I am growing 2 Parajubaea cocoides two years now and would love to see how big they grow...I love the photo of them on RPS but would like to see some showing their size proportions :)

Thank you very much in advance!

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Michel64

Here is a picture of my Parajubea tor. tor., planted in May. It's growing slowly, but still looking very good despite the change in it's environment.

How will it pass through next winter, the answer in a few months.

GBPIX_photo_111287.jpg

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JEFF IN MODESTO

I know this is a Parajubaea torallyi thread, but I figured I would push my way in and post a pic of my P. cocoides taken today... They do grow faster Sept through Nov... I bet my palm will add another foot by xmas.

Not sure why everyone is fascinated with Parajubaea torallyi, some say they are more hardy?

My P. Cocoides took the 24f - 25f in 2007 pretty well.

Jeff

post-116-1221167647_thumb.jpg

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turfpro01

How good will these do in central California heat? I was going to order seeds, but read they dony like heat? or is it just humidity they dont like.

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JEFF IN MODESTO
How good will these do in central California heat? I was going to order seeds, but read they dony like heat? or is it just humidity they dont like.

Well, They grow faster in spring and fall, Slow in Summer.

but this palm has done just fine with temps as hot as 113f and our low that day was 87f... for the week our average was near 110f.

We are very humid in the winter... lots of fog. And very hot and dry in the summer.

Jeff

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turfpro01

Thanks Jeff, Im in visalia right down the road from you. lol Im starting a palm tree nursery and will go ahead and add these to my list. Maybe ill find a a few liners and see how they do in containers.

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PalmGuyWC

I have about the same temps. as Jeff does in the Central Valley. August was very hot here but my night temps have been in the 60's, a little cooler than the Valley. I have about a dozen Parajubaeas in containers with fronds just begining to divide. They have continued to grow through the summer. My largest P T V T in the ground has fronds about 6' long and has doubled in size this summer. As mentioned, they seem to grow fastest in Sept. and Oct. They will take the heat, but it's the humidity with high temps. they don't like.

Dick

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AJQ

What about humidity and lower temps say 15C - 20C / 59F -68F ?

Regards Andy.

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JEFF IN MODESTO
What about humidity and lower temps say 15C - 20C / 59F -68F ?

Regards Andy.

Andy... That seems like the perfect range for my palm. Unfortunatly, my daily high temps only fall in that range for a short time in the early spring and fall. Still, it would seem that temps below say 20-22f might be fatal for a palm the size of mine. Mine did have about 50% leaf surface frosted in 2007 at 24f, but the palm was much smaller then.

Jeff

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PalmGuyWC

It has been my experience that anytime the temps. fall below 25F (-4C) and frost is on the foliage that Parajubaeas will show foliage damage, but they will survive much lower temps. Last winter I squeeked through with a low of 25.5F, but I threw a sheet over my P. T V T on the two coldest nights and it came through with no damage. The prior winter my low was 23.5F and it got about 60% foliage damage, but it recovered and grew very fast the following summer. The P T V T is to large to cover this winter, but I may put a couple of flood lights under it on the coldest nights.

Does anyone have a good sized P. sunkha? I hear it's the eaisest to grow and maybe the most cold hardy. I have one with divided fronds but I haven't planted it yet, and I think now, I will wait until next spring as I'm expecting a cold winter.

My Butia X Parajubaea came through the last two winters with no damage and it was unprotected and has no canopy. It's the fastest growing palm in my garden. TikiRick is going to post some pictures of it soon. It's a beauty.

Dick

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Roaringwater

Here is my tor-tor, planted in spring. It has been the coolest and wettest summer here in ages, but the palm has made very good growth. Now we'll see how it takes to our winter gales!

post-740-1221400891_thumb.jpg

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Al in Kona

I've always liked the Parajubaeas but had hesitation about trying to grow any of them here in Hawaii. They were discussed on this board a few years back and it was Gaston in Argentina who encouraged me to try since we are up slope at about 381 m (1,250 ft) elevation and on the leeward side (drier than the windward side of the island). This means we average 3 to 4 degrees F. cooler than down at sea level.

Anyway, I was able to find a tiny 2-strap leaf seedling in a liner at JD Andersen Nursery and decided to try grow it. I planted that tiny seedling almost immediately in the ground on a slope in pretty much full sun between two Bougainvilleas. After an initial delay in starting to grow it has since kept a slow steady growth rate and after about 3 years now stands at slightly over 1m (3 ft.) tall. It is kind of hidden away from view yet so rarely ever gets any supplemental watering or other care but doesn't seem to mind. It has not been fertilized yet either. I do weed it on rare occasions and throw them around the palm as a light mulch. Typically we have morning sun and afternoon cloud build-up with afternoon/early evening showers quite common during the summer months. Normally winter is drier, more all day sun, however, some winters can bring a few frontal low pressure systems that pass or sometimes stall bringing heavy rainfall. Wet or dry our humidity levels never drop very low. I tell you this so you can have an idea of the climatic conditions my Parajubaea torallyi var. torallyi is growing in and doing quite well - see photo below: Hope it continues to do well despite our tropical climate.

post-90-1221980002_thumb.jpg

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AJQ

Al, I have had one in the ground for 4 years now from strap leaf, it currently only grows 4 new fronds a year and is nowhere as big as the one in your photo. Also mine does not take the wind very well. It would seem your conditions would be better than mine even if it is a lot more tropical than my cool temperate climate. Nice one!

Regards Andy.

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Rafael

BUMP!

Just to show my parajubaea row, middle one is microcarpa.

post-3292-082890600 1295789449_thumb.jpg

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iamjv

Nice bump Rafael... my parajubaea microcarpa is about the same size as yours (but potted) and has seen temps of 26F twice this winter. These temps have only brought on a little bronzing on the older fronds. If the sun comes out later today I'll take a picture and upload it here. Jv

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kelen

Fabulous!!!! I`m crazy by Parajubaeas, it`s my dream

Edited by kelen

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pfancy

heres my tortor in the phoenix west valley thats been getting hammered by 110-115F temps for at least 6hrs/d for the last weekpost-5751-064388700 1314205284_thumb.jpg

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Michel64

Here is a picture of my Parajubea tor. tor., planted in May. It's growing slowly, but still looking very good despite the change in it's environment.

How will it pass through next winter, the answer in a few months.

GBPIX_photo_111287.jpg

The same today. Slow at first, it's speeding up now.

post-2014-005126000 1314212527_thumb.jpg

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ghar41

Parajubaea cocoides has been a wimp in my garden, burns every winter.

ParajubaeasSummer2011075-1.jpg

P tor tor does better in the winter.

ParajubaeasSummer2011078-1.jpg

But the real winner so far has been P. sunkha. Neither of mine have burned, and its a really nice looking palm.

ParajubaeasSummer2011073-1.jpg

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gyuseppe

BUMP!

Just to show my parajubaea row, middle one is microcarpa.

post-3292-082890600 1295789449_thumb.jpg

rafael how are your parajubaea ? the heat of these days some leaves burned ?

  • Upvote 1

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Rafael

BUMP!

Just to show my parajubaea row, middle one is microcarpa.

post-3292-082890600 1295789449_thumb.jpg

rafael how are your parajubaea ? the heat of these days some leaves burned ?

So far, no damage, growing like weeds!

And yours?

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gyuseppe

Rafael , I 2 times I tried to grow Parajubaea torallyi var. torallyi,but they always died in the summer heat :(

Perhaps you have cooler air in summer

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Rafael

We have 23/26ºC summer days. And 15/19º summer nights. Sometimes it goes until 33º C.

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gyuseppe

Rafael in Italy these days we have a heatwave from Africa,temperatures reach 40ºC during the day !

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Adam from Oz

Rafael in Italy these days we have a heatwave from Africa,temperatures reach 40ºC during the day !

My Parajubaea cocoides did quite well with the 46C we had in 2009 with 5% humidity. I simply gave it a spray of water every hour until the worst of it was over.

Best.

me.

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pfancy

well another 112F day here in Phoenix and the little tortor seems to be fine. weather is calling for 110F+ for the next 4 days which will make for ~10 straight days its been getting 6+ hrs/d of sun at these temps. will post more pix after the heatwave. BTW-i got this palm in Fallbrook, California on Aug 5th let it sit in 1/2day shade for 2 weeks then planted.

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pfancy

heres my tortor in the phoenix west valley thats been getting hammered by 110-115F temps for at least 6hrs/d for the last weekattachicon.gif Photo0621.jpg

Same palm two years later. I think it may actually be P. cocoides,tho.

post-5751-0-33765400-1374637693_thumb.jp

Edited by pfancy
  • Upvote 1

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Brahea Axel

heres my tortor in the phoenix west valley thats been getting hammered by 110-115F temps for at least 6hrs/d for the last weekattachicon.gifPhoto0621.jpg

Same palm two years later. I think it may actually be P. cocoides,tho.

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

Now that I see both pictures I am pretty sure that's not a parajubaea, it's either a mule palm or it's a fantastic natural hybrid with cocoides and butia. I think it's most likely a mule.

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pfancy

U r right. Got to b a hybrid. More pix

post-5751-0-52609100-1374639919_thumb.jp

post-5751-0-52532400-1374639971_thumb.jp

post-5751-0-47340100-1374640014_thumb.jp

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Sandy Loam

I have been looking around on the web for photos of mature Parajubaea Torallyi var. Torallyi with a person standing beside it to show how big it will grow to be. I have had difficulty finding any photos with people in them, so I am having difficulty envisaging their mature size.

I have a PTVT that I planted as a juvenile about 3 years ago, but it was planted too close to the surrounding plants, and now it is too late to transplant it elsewhere. At the time of planting, I didn't expect it to survive because of my humidity and occasional overnight freezes in winter. It was just an experiment, but has thrived so far and now I am expecting it to grow to maturity. My PTVT doesn't mind my humidity and has never suffered any cold damage in the past 3 years or so.

How wide is the trunk on the PTVT going to be in thirty years? What is your experience with a palm that grows too close to other palms? Does it simply adapt and grow with a narrower trunk? Will its growth be stunted in height?

I also have some questions about the size of the PTVT crown in 20 or 30 years. Is the PTVT's foliage going to be so wide that it will smother and shade out everything in its surroundings? If the foliage is quite feathery/whispy, I am not concerned because the sun will always penetrate through, e.g. like a syagrus romanzoffiana.

As of right now, my PTVT is planted:

- about 2 feet from a four-foot tall cordyline australis 'red star'

- about 3 feet from a still-juvenile bismarckia nobilis palm

- about 3 feet from a mule palm, aka. butia capitata x. syagrus romanzoffiana

- about 3-4 feet from a yucca elephantipes which is almost six feet tall

- about 5 feet from a small dypsis decipiens (this one doesn't concern me because the dypsis decipiens is so incredibly slow growing that I will probably never be able to enjoy it anyway)

What should I expect in the long term? My PTVT just became pinnate in the past year or so. It is still young.

As a final, unrelated comment, this old thread contained some observations about parajubaea sensitivity in wet and humid climates. I must say that my parajubaea sunka and parajubaea torally var. torallyi have never been sensitive to our high humidity or the unusually rainy weather that we have had in Gainesville, Florida. However, my parajubaea torallyi var. microcarpa died a couple of years ago at the end of a summer, presumably due to the extreme humidity that it could not tolerate. It was my fastest growing parajubaea, but it seemed to be the least adaptable to my climate.

Thank you in advance for your input, everyone.

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DoomsDave

Hi, PC

Here's a picture of my 800 Pound Gorilla right in front of my house. The Shoe is 12.5" (32 cm) long. It's very much in keeping with Ed's untitled picture above.

I estimate its width to be about 3.5 to 4 feet across. I had no idea it would get that big when I planted it. If I'd known, I'd have put it further from everything.

I planted it as a juvenile in 2006, more or less. If you scroll up to post no. 85 you'll see a picture of what it looked like in the spring of 2008. It was about 5 - 6 feet tall then.

post-208-0-04457900-1417151760_thumb.jpg post-208-1221101206_thumb.jpg

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DoomsDave

This is the 800PG from my roof; it's the big palm on the left, with silvery under-leaves. A one-story house. The overall height of the plant is about 20 - 25 feet now.

There are other plants near it, which don't stunt it at all. I suspect something really huge might do that, but 800PG has just grown above its neighbors. It shaded out a Tibuchina, and is about 3 feet away from a large, about-to-trunk Kentiopsis oliviformis. It doesn't seem to bother the other plants right nearby,which include Chamadorea ernest-augustii and metallica, plus Dypsis baronii, and a Pinanga javana.

Just make sure you have the space.

post-208-0-12709600-1417152065_thumb.jpg

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Rafael

Hi, PC

Here's a picture of my 800 Pound Gorilla right in front of my house. The Shoe is 12.5" (32 cm) long. It's very much in keeping with Ed's untitled picture above.

I estimate its width to be about 3.5 to 4 feet across. I had no idea it would get that big when I planted it. If I'd known, I'd have put it further from everything.

I planted it as a juvenile in 2006, more or less. If you scroll up to post no. 85 you'll see a picture of what it looked like in the spring of 2008. It was about 5 - 6 feet tall then.

attachicon.gif001.JPG attachicon.gifIMG_4700.JPG

This is what i expect my 6 tor tor to turn into in a couple of.... well maybe in 10/15 years! And i will be a lucky guy :)

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