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Scott

Parajubaea torallyi

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Scott

This is a really nice palm. Mine is still strap leaved, and would love to see some examples of different stages of it's growth.

If you have one - let's see it!

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Gaston in Argentina

Here´s some pictures of this beautytaken in habitat eight years ago.

parajubaeatorsucreub2.jpg

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Gaston in Argentina

A young one, volunteer  growing near its mother, also microcarpa growing in Sucre city, the city of the torallyis.-

parajubaeatorallyimicrowc8.jpg

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Gaston in Argentina

Two pictures of the var. torallyi,

the first an young one, fruiting for first time, partialy shaded by an Erythrina falcata canopy.-

The second, a bad cared waterless, still young var. torallyi, photo in winter (the dry season). Cochabamba bot. garden.- Bol.-

parasnk7.jpg

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Gaston in Argentina

A semiwild old sunkha in Vallegrande, Bol.-  

sunkhainwildjl4.jpg

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Gaston in Argentina

All this pictures show the same palmera, var. torallyi, the garden was built with the house a hundred years ago.-

torallyiinprivategardenwa3.jpg

From the base of the trunk.-

vartorallyibe1.jpg

Cheers. Gaston

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PalmGuyWC

Gaston,

Thanks for the great pictures of the Parajubaeas.  I've  been wanting to see what a "teenager" would look like. They seem to have "upright" fronds which is what I was hoping for. I planted my P. T V T near some Trachycarpus and I was hoping it would grow faster and above the Trachs. and give them some shade. So far, the T. wagneranus are growing faster than the Parajubaea. They have exploded with growth this summer, and each one has grown about 10 new fronds this growing season, and I can expect about 2.5 more months of warm weather and growth.

This has been a great summer in my location, not to hot but with warmish nights. "Warmish" is around 60F (16C), sometimes a little cooler, sometimes a little warmer. (Sometimes I invent words).

Dick

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Kris

Dear Friends  :)

thanks for the visuals and i realised that this palms also falls under high maintanence palm,meaning it needs constant triming to make it appear neat & tidy !

thanks & love,

Kris  :)

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MattyB

Awesome pictures Gaston!  Thanks.  I was just thinking about donating one of these to a local cafe.  They redid their front patio area and it's a bit sparse.  I think the Parajubaea is a palm that can take low maintenance in our climate.

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Jim in Los Altos

(Gaston in Argentina @ Aug. 24 2007,02:29)

QUOTE
Two pictures of the var. torallyi,

the first an young one, fruiting for first time, partialy shaded by an Erythrina falcata canopy.-

The second, a bad cared waterless, still young var. torallyi, photo in winter (the dry season). Cochabamba bot. garden.- Bol.-

parasnk7.jpg

Man! I had no idea the trunks of these grew so wide! Judging from the picture with the man next to the young P. torallyi, it looks similar to the width of a CIDP. Looks like, in a few years, I'll need some of my driveway/walkway carved away to make room. I've got three fast growing juveniles (pinnate 3 to 4 footers) within inches of concrete and flagstone. This will be interesting because those palms aren't being moved for ANY reason!

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Scott

Gaston - thanks for the pics! It certainly sheds some light on this palm at different stages in it's life.

I love the shot of the "volunteer" and of the one looking up with all the fruit. Great shots!

Thanks

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Gaston in Argentina

torallyis group are the best of the best for you, californians.-

Regarding cool nights for this palm: I get an average of 10 days of summer with hot nights (conditioned air for sleeping needed) and they look also healty the same,  in fact just some bit nights in my summer the temps. are lower then -18°-20° C. and sometime 30° C. with conditioned air for sleep.-

I see the cultivated torallyis at my place had destroyed many growing early myths belived for cultivating this species, mostly based in habitat growth conditions.- Here, they are surviving very well to freeze temperatures of winter (frost temps, some snowfall), high temperatures of summer nights, clayish soil, fertilizer, small pots, growing speed, some excess of watering and others.-

Regarding the trunk diameter, much of that young palm trunk is just a dense layer of fibre, still they are wide, but never as their cousins JUBAEAS.-

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PalmGuyWC

Jim,

I have a similar problem although I allowed 4 feet away from my driveway. Apparently P T V T grows to be a monster palm and is more compairable to Jubaea than C I D P. The ones pictured are growing in habitat, so with some water and fertilizer....and baring no hard freezes.....these things may grow to monster preportions.

Dick

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Scott

I think the photos in deezpalms Jubaea post illustrate what your saying. Those trunks are quite large.

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Gaston in Argentina

Not just in wide.-The heigh can be a problem also in 300 years if theres powerlines nearly....:-) or... for the flyers cars of the future...

microcarpajd8.jpg

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PalmGuyWC

Gaston,

You are THE MAN when it comes to providing us with beautiful photos, and cultural conditions for growing Parajubaeas. It sounds like you and I have a very similar climate, though we very rarely get snow.

This past winter was brutal here.....night after night of hard frosts, and freezing and my P T v T was about 60% damaged, but it had only been in the ground for less than a year. With warmer weather, it has come back like gang busters and is growing very fast. I expect when they get older and have formed a trunk, and the crown is further away from the ground, that they will be much more resilent to cold.

I think you are right....P T V T is the palm of the future for the San Francisco Bay Area and many areas of California. I wish I could be around to see the results 50 years from now, but it gives me great satisfaction that I'm helping lay the ground work.

Dick

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NCpalmqueen

Gaston, thank you for all the good data and for the photos.  I have a tor var tor as well, albeit in a pot.  This has been one of the hotest summers on record here in NC, so I expected my parajub to croak as soon as the extreme heat started.  I had lost one before.   Alas, my parajub actually looks happy...it is out of direct sunlight, however.  If it can make it through this summer, then maybe I won't be so worried about it tolerating heat anymore.  Next worry--->NC winters.    :(

-Ms. Worrywort

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Al in Kona

Here is one at Ralph Velez garden in Orange county, Southern California taken 8-06

post-90-1188004492_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

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merrill

Hi, Gaston:

How some of us in humid locales like Florida envy you your Parajubaea!  Do you think Pj survive to greater heights than many other cocosoid palms?  Thanks again for the photos. - merrill

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Gaston in Argentina

Hola Merrill.- I sawyou in the pictures with ButiaXJubaeas, nice palms!

The same then Washingtonias, (and grapefruits -vineyards?, olea europea, peper tree and those sun lovers plants) here grow, but never so good,  nice looking and so tall as those around Mendoza or Salta city with a samme climate then much of centrla and south california, both knew as grapefruits/wine production.- Someone should try the torallyis in central Florida, backly then the delicated P. cocoides, torallyis are showing us to be, by far, more addaptable to different climates respecting temperature ranges.-

Also i have here an average of 10 - 15 days with hot of 40° C. in summer, strong sun, and no problem for torallyis, backly, they seems happy the same.-As bigger, better.-

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merrill

Hi, Gaston:

As we say here, I may have put my money on the wrong horse.  My P. sunka seem to be growing O. K. here  in North Florida.  Of course, they will be protected, but not necessarily forever!  Best Wishes, - merrill

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AJQ

I got this one early on this year.

It's a Parajubaea torallyii microcarpa. I will protect it for the first couple of winters.

We don't normally get offered ParaJubs this size over here, so I was quite pleased to get hold of one.

The tree to the right will be trimmed accordingly, as required and / or eventually removed.

IMG_1286.jpg

Regards Andy. :)

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osideterry

I just recently picked up a 5 gallon Parajubaea sunkha. My SoCal guide lists it as slower than both P. cocoides and P. torallyi, but equally coldhardy. Anyone here have experience with the sunkha?

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deezpalms

I have seedling of both torallyi & sunkha. Both of the same age, grown from seed and the sunkha is almost twice the size of the torallyi's.

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osideterry

By the way Andy, that's a nice palm you scored there. All I can find here are strapped leaf versions. I'd be trying it in 9a as well.

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merrill

Hi, Gaston, osideterry and deezpalms:

Recently one of my small P. sunkha here in North Florida began to grow at a quite respectable rate; as fast as typical Syagrus [except for the steroidal queen palm!]. It hasn't really received any special treatment.  Growing this well at this early age in Florida is quite promising.  

Gaston, can you compare growth rates of Jubaea and any of the Parajubaea in your part of the world?

Best Wishes, merrill

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Gaston in Argentina

Hola Merrill.

torallyi grow very fast here, sunkha not so but as a Butia, Cocoides is slower of all for me and Jubaea is very slow.-

In all the cases, Jubaea incluided, i see they speed their growth rate everyyear, so, make them fastest as they take bigger.-

By pictures i can see Parajubs. grow fastest in California then here.

Cheers. Gaston

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steve 9atx

Gaston

Do you know of any Butia/Parajubea cocoides hybrids there?  I'm curious to know how fast they grow in your area compared to the species you mention.

Steve

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Jim in Los Altos

(steve 9atx @ Aug. 29 2007,21:24)

QUOTE
Gaston

Do you know of any Butia/Parajubea cocoides hybrids there?  I'm curious to know how fast they grow in your area compared to the species you mention.

Steve

Steve,

My Butia X Parajubaea grows just slightly faster than a pure Butia at its age. I bought a strap leafed two year old two years ago and it's now a fully pinnate 32" tall X 32" wide plant. I believe it will really pick up speed when its got several inches of trunk width. Overall its hardy and vigorous. FYI, it's growing in partial sun. Full sun may have made it grow faster.

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PalmGuyWC

I've posted the following info in another thread, but heer goes again.  I have a P. T V T and a Butia X Parajubaea growing about 30 feet from each other.  They both get early morning and mid-day sun, but are shaded in late afternoon. They are fully exposed with no overhead protection and they both have been in the ground for about a year and half.

With the summer heat, ample water, and fertilizer, they are both growing at a rapid rate right now. I'd have to say the Butia X Parajubaea is the fastest growing palm in my garden.  It has already more than doubled in size since it was planted and now it's higher than my head. So far it has taken my dry summer heat and a very cold winter with no signs of stress. The Parajubaea was about 60% burned in the freezes this past winter, but it's sprung back into growth with warm weather.

I have read that Parajubaeas slow their growth in mid summer, but I haven't found that to be true. It does seem that they grow fastest here in Sept. and Oct. as the days become shorter and the nights cooler. About mid November as the night temps fall below 50F (10C) most of my palms shut down for the winter and growth is hardly detectable until spring.

Patrick Schafer was visiting yesterday, perched on the top of a tall ladder, emasculating male flowers from a Syagrus, and working in 100+F. temps. He also pollinated a couple of the last Butia inflorescenses of the season. The poor guy was exhausted by the end of the day, and I don't see how he does it, but he's dedicated to his hybridization program.

The other Patrick (Iwan) will be visiting this weekend and taking some pictures here, and we hope to get them posted soon.

Dick

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PalmGuyWC

Woops, my apology. I meant to say "Robert" (Iwan) will be visiting, and I hope, photographing.

Dick

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Alberto

(Gaston in Argentina @ Aug. 24 2007,15:14)

QUOTE
I see the cultivated torallyis at my place had destroyed many growing early myths belived for cultivating this species, mostly based in habitat growth conditions.- Here, they are surviving very well to freeze temperatures of winter (frost temps, some snowfall), high temperatures of summer nights, clayish soil, fertilizer, small pots, growing speed, some excess of watering and others.-

Gaston,do your tortors also grow in clayish soil? My best soil here is red clayish ,but that is surprisingly well draining.

    My first germinated tortors I planted in very sandy soil on little soil mounts,and mixing more sand to it!!!!

    Do you think I can try some tortors at this more clayish (=more fertile) areas of my place?

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35HD

GASTON ARE YOU SURE THAT'S JUST A TORALLYI AND NOT A MICROCARPA? MOST TORALLYI I'VE SEEN HAVE 'MESSY' FIBROUS TRUNKS. THE T. MICROCARPA IS SAID TO BE JUST AS HARDY.

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Gaston in Argentina

35HD

Im completely sure that those are var. torallyi and not microcarpa because i have seen the palms by myself, harvested their fruits etc.

All the subtipes have abundant fibres in the trunk base and crown.- The sunkha show best quality, finner fibre.-

Alberto, i have claysh soil also and not problema for torallyi, just i have digged an big hole before and prepared the soil inside (with humus, organic, wood chips, sand), after the time, the roots are forced to enter in the clay without trouble.- Parajubs specialy have very strong, thick and agressive roots.-  

Something gived me excelent result in torally pots, pumice.-

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Greg in Lake Forest CA

(Gaston in Argentina @ Sep. 01 2007,00:50)

QUOTE
35HD

Im completely sure that those are var. torallyi and not microcarpa because i have seen the palms by myself, harvested their fruits etc.

All the subtipes have abundant fibres in the trunk base and crown.- The sunkha show best quality, finner fibre.-

Alberto, i have claysh soil also and not problema for torallyi, just i have digged an big hole before and prepared the soil inside (with humus, organic, wood chips, sand), after the time, the roots are forced to enter in the clay without trouble.- Parajubs specialy have very strong, thick and agressive roots.-  

Something gived me excelent result in torally pots, pumice.-

Hola Gaston,

Thanks for the reply. Your comments are always appreciated. Would you happen to have any more recent photo's of of Parajub sunkha? Please feel free to post any Parajub photo's. So few larger plants in the U.S.

Thanks, Greg

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35HD

GOOD TO KNOW, THANKS GASTON. I JUST GOT INTO PARA'S, ABOUT ABOUT 30 OF EACH.

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merrill

I imagine several of us, perhaps many of us, would really appreciate a photo of P. sunkha as large as possible.  merrill

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Gaston in Argentina

Heres some pictures of old Parajubaea sunkha growing semiwild sunkhaquebradazorrox2lv3.jpg

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Gaston in Argentina

A picture of the same then the previously showed but with another screen.- The day was windy.- Note the dry low thornbush vegetation.-

sunkha2vallx1bv1.jpg

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Gaston in Argentina

I like this pic  of Parajubaea sunkha that was showed before.- Many of the firsts seeds sent in bulk quantities to the US come from this five palms.-

sunkha5x1om8.jpg

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