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tinman10101

Dypsis prestoniana in 9b

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tinman10101

Just looking at this today and very proud I have kept it alive from a 4" seedling from Floribunda about 10-11 years ago.  Very slow for me but the greater the risk, the greater the reward. :D

 

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Billeb

Looking good. But slow is right….

gonna be epic in another 10. Good work. 
 

-dale

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tinman10101
27 minutes ago, Billeb said:

Looking good. But slow is right….

gonna be epic in another 10. Good work. 
 

-dale

Thanks Bill.  You should be able to get this growth in half the time in your location.  Regardless, a must have in any palm enthusiast garden.

Cheers

Tin

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tim_brissy_13

Beautiful palm, I wouldn’t say that’s too slow either. 
 

There’s a whole bunch of D prestoniana hybrids floating around now in Australia and they are known to be promiscuous. I’m no expert, but by the look of yours I’d suspect there might be some blood of one of the cane type palms in it, maybe D cabadae, pembana or madagascariensis.  It just has a more upright growth habit and a smoother blue/white colouration to the leaf base than I’m used to seeing on D prestoniana. Of course that could also be environmental as it appears to be in the shade of other palms. But hybrid vigour might help to explain the hardiness and I believe there are many flowering Dypsis at Floribunda. 

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Looking Glass

Great job nursing a little fetus up to that.   Here’s a pic I took at the one at Searle Bros in South Florida last year.   Something to look forward to.  Wonder if someone bought it and dug it out before they closed the shop?  These are pretty great looking in middle age….

69780D51-920A-4960-A11A-89CCF1A7D7EE.thumb.jpeg.fbb007869c5fa7d5531e310f6bacc571.jpeg

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tinman10101
13 hours ago, tim_brissy_13 said:

Beautiful palm, I wouldn’t say that’s too slow either. 
 

There’s a whole bunch of D prestoniana hybrids floating around now in Australia and they are known to be promiscuous. I’m no expert, but by the look of yours I’d suspect there might be some blood of one of the cane type palms in it, maybe D cabadae, pembana or madagascariensis.  It just has a more upright growth habit and a smoother blue/white colouration to the leaf base than I’m used to seeing on D prestoniana. Of course that could also be environmental as it appears to be in the shade of other palms. But hybrid vigour might help to explain the hardiness and I believe there are many flowering Dypsis at Floribunda. 

Thanks Tim for your input.  It makes perfect sense the hybridization considering it looks strangely different than a regular prestoniana trunk.  I do know Jeff has many occurences of hybridization throughout his garden as well due to the close proximity of all his flowering dypsis and your cold hardiness assumption further supports your hypothesis.  

It is planted in a highly shaded jungle area so much that I embarrassingly cannot take a full picture of the leaves because it is crowded out by leaves from a foxy lady 1.5 feet from it and a mule palm.  Unfortunately, as a rookie way long ago, I just planted everything very carelessly spaced to one another.  

Cheers

Tin

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tinman10101
14 hours ago, tinman10101 said:

Thanks Bill.  You should be able to get this growth in half the time in your location.  Regardless, a must have in any palm enthusiast garden.

Cheers

Tin

Sorry I meant "Dale".

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Billeb
3 hours ago, tinman10101 said:

Sorry I meant "Dale".

Thanks Tin, I wasn’t gonna correct you :D

I do think you are correct, my climate/location would be ideal for this tree but as like nearly everyone near the beach, real estate is at a premium and I’m not confident I can shoehorn this one in anywhere. The example @Looking Glass gave is an awesome size. For some reason I thought they got way bigger ex: carsmithii?!?? 
 

-dale

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Tracy
7 hours ago, Billeb said:

For some reason I thought they got way bigger ex: carslmithii?!?? 

There is some variation in size and the one posted in the Searle Bros nursery looks like it has a narrower gauge trunk but still within the normal distribution.  I have two specimens that are quite a bit different in my yard, one narrower than the other.  It could be hybridization or just variation within the species. 

 tinman10101 ,Tin yours looks fantastic.  If it does turn out to have a little narrower gauge trunk it sounds like it wouldn't be a bad thing given the adjacent palms and I'm sure you won't complain if you have to do some editing to make room for it if it's a giant someday.  Great job.  To me, your Dypsis prestoniana is more a interesting and noteworthy achievement than Cocos nucifera growing in coastal Southern California, but that's an opinion and preference on my part.

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Josue Diaz

Dude! Very cool! I've had one from floribunda in 9b also, but I've had it only 4 (???) years. Yours looks great

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tinman10101
On 1/16/2022 at 6:20 PM, Tracy said:

There is some variation in size and the one posted in the Searle Bros nursery looks like it has a narrower gauge trunk but still within the normal distribution.  I have two specimens that are quite a bit different in my yard, one narrower than the other.  It could be hybridization or just variation within the species. 

 tinman10101 ,Tin yours looks fantastic.  If it does turn out to have a little narrower gauge trunk it sounds like it wouldn't be a bad thing given the adjacent palms and I'm sure you won't complain if you have to do some editing to make room for it if it's a giant someday.  Great job.  To me, your Dypsis prestoniana is more a interesting and noteworthy achievement than Cocos nucifera growing in coastal Southern California, but that's an opinion and preference on my part.

Tracy is correct.  I've seen variability in both trunk girth and leaf characteristics.  The one we see at Floribunda is much more robust but most likely attributed to environmental factors and genetic variability.

Thank you for the compliment Tracy.  I too feel that Cocos Nucifera is not more common in Southern California specifically because more people have not tried them except palm enthusiasts.  I think there would be a lot more niche micro climates discovered throughout Southern California if palm plantings (excluding big box store varieties) became a new fad.    :D

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tinman10101
On 1/16/2022 at 11:22 PM, Josue Diaz said:

Dude! Very cool! I've had one from floribunda in 9b also, but I've had it only 4 (???) years. Yours looks great

Thanks for the compliment ... definitely worth the wait and more importantly, self gratification.  

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