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MonkeDonkezz

Area Of New York City in zone 8a according to Wikipedia?

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MonkeDonkezz

Hello PalmTalk!

There is going to be a short introduction first.

My name is Yahor though I prefer you call me by my username and I am from Staten Island, a borough of NYC.

I don't feel comfy telling people my age, but I am 12-16 years old.

I first got my interest in palms when visiting Jacksonville Florida last year.

I want to start growing them.

So the reason I am making this post is something that has caught my eye for a while.  According to Wikipedia, on the page about NYC's climate, the climate data graphs and classifications section show that  areas of NYC might be in zone 8a.

LaGuardia has 11 F (-12 C) as the minimum for January.

Belvedere Castle in Central Park  has 9.8 F (-12.3 C) as the minimum.

JFK has 10 F (-12) as the minimum.

Sorry if the pictures look bad

I find the emotes on the forum funny :yay::beat_deadhorse::shaka-2::violin:

image.thumb.png.7b181cd4d51c470adbfa95ee6100bc49.png

 

image.thumb.png.07686a95c15dc2bc0e4ad4ad91ba363a.png

image.thumb.png.bdf5557c839f7d9eaa6d03a0d95e5a47.png

image.thumb.png.03bb9ca01540580cd3a93fdbccd53872.png

 

 

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MonkeDonkezz

Sorry If I posted this in the wrong forum!

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Fusca

Welcome to Palmtalk!  Probably better suited for the "Weather" forum but no problem.  If I'm not mistaken the cold hardiness zones are calculated from the average yearly minimum temperatures over the last 30 years for a given area and I don't see this data in the charts you displayed.  So you'd have to find the average of the lowest temperature from 1992, 1993, ... 2020, 2021.  Then the actual zone would be based on a range of temperatures set by the USDA.  According to the latest map that I've seen Long Island and parts of NYC are zone 7a.  Possibly some unique microclimates could be 7b but I seriously doubt zone 8.  These zones are just general guidelines for planting anyway and don't guarantee success for growing palms as there's lost of factors involved such as duration of freezes, number of freeze events, precipitation, etc.

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MonkeDonkezz

Thank you!

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MonkeDonkezz

METRONYCUSDAZoneMap1.jpg

I used this map to define zones of the nyc metro and it showed that zone 7b covered most of the city, with the exceptions of parts of Staten Island and The Bronx, though this is using the 2012 USDA map

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LeonardHolmes

I think you have discovered a jumbo microclimate.  It's probably the urban heat island effect.  Great post!  Welcome.

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Jimhardy

Another thing to consider is, look at the avg daily mean for JFK for January.

Its barely (32.8) above freezing, in a below avg temp year the avg temp would be

well below freezing and duration of cold presents problems as well as ultimate lows....

still putting some palms in the ground and not needing to cover them to often

 with to heavy of protection would make for a fun hobby there.

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Teegurr

Laguardia is not 8a according to the graph. It's 8a for January, but the average YEARLY minimum is 9f, which is a warm 7b.

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EJ NJ

Who cares about how cold it has been in the past 30 years 30 years is too long in my opinion! And I consider my area to be Zone 8a!

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SeanK

Your best bet is Trachycarpus fortunei. It is cold tolerant to 5 degrees F and temperate in its growth requirements. Unlike a Sabal, it won't need 8 months of tropical heat to grow.

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MonkeDonkezz

Thank you all for replying ^_^ 

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Gator

Welcome to PalmTalk !

If youre going to be a zone pusher like the rest of us... this is the place to be !

Enjoy

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Las Palmas Norte
On 1/20/2022 at 6:36 AM, EJ NJ said:

Who cares about how cold it has been in the past 30 years 30 years is too long in my opinion! And I consider my area to be Zone 8a!

LMAO !:floor: Frozen dead palms don't care.

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Jimhardy

It stays above freezing in my refrigerator and although I am not sure what zone that would be

I am thinking of growing some palms in there I just need to find a light that stays on when

the door is closed.....on another note. I went through the same thing when I was that age, went to 

Florida, Alabama etc and came back with an Y. Aloifolia and tried to grow it in StL Mo....that was 40+

years ago.....

I also started growing palms and banana plants-then I went to Arizona and got into cactus...

and then....I discovered plants from Madagascar and Southeast Africa that look like a combo

of cactus and palms....at your age the world(until it ends) is your oyster so I say go for it and enjoy the journey!

 

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MonkeDonkezz

Yeah, I'm gonna start growing yuccas first then move on to growing palms

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DAVEinMB
On 1/24/2022 at 2:53 PM, Las Palmas Norte said:

LMAO !:floor: Frozen dead palms don't care.

Yea, what's data anyways

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DAVEinMB
On 1/20/2022 at 9:36 AM, EJ NJ said:

Who cares about how cold it has been in the past 30 years 30 years is too long in my opinion! And I consider my area to be Zone 8a!

I like your optimism but you have to remember that if you take a small enough sample size you can manipulate data however you want. Hell if I picked one isolated week in the middle of the winter to base my planting on I might be Zone 11 or 12. 30 years worth of climate data is a large enough sample set to provide, with reasonable confidence, reliable temperature data to use when selecting plants for your garden. 

Take the last 4 winters in Myrtle Beach for example, two 9b winters sandwiched in between pretty solid 8b winters with ice events. 

Just food for thought...

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Nomad NYC

I actually live near JFK, so I'm definitely living in a solid 7B zone!

But according to the old 1990 USDA Hardiness Zone Map, thirty two years ago, my area was Zone 7A.

Oh well, I hope I do live long enough to see 8A though.

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Nomad NYC
On 1/4/2022 at 8:58 PM, MonkeDonkezz said:

METRONYCUSDAZoneMap1.jpg

I used this map to define zones of the nyc metro and it showed that zone 7b covered most of the city, with the exceptions of parts of Staten Island and The Bronx, though this is using the 2012 USDA map

Yes,  can easily see the NYC Metro region becoming an 8A / 8B zone in a couple of decades.

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