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Pacific Northwest Arctic Outbreak?

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Paradise Found

Here is Livistona chinensis with out to much damage, protected in pop up greenhouse with heat. 

IMG-2717.JPG

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MarkbVet
On 1/4/2022 at 1:51 PM, Trustandi said:

Cold damages so far from 4 days of below freezing with low of 17F:  

1: Filibusta wrapped with bedsheet and Christmas light.  The fronds are exposed to the snow.

2. Philodendron selloum - unprotected

3. Aloe striatula - unprotected buried in snow

 

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You think your Philodendron has any chance of survival?  Is it the 'hope' variety, supposedly root hardy to 7b?   :-)

Edited by MarkbVet
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Chester B
1 hour ago, MarkbVet said:

You think your Philodendron has any chance of survival?  Is it the 'hope' variety, supposedly root hardy to 7b?   :-)

@MarkbVet these are root hardy in our climate.  You don't need to buy the Hope variety, just the cheapo ones Home Depot brings in every year. for $7.98.  I've had mine for at least 4 years - 2 winters in a pot on the balcony and since in the ground.

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MarkbVet
52 minutes ago, Chester B said:

@MarkbVet these are root hardy in our climate.  You don't need to buy the Hope variety, just the cheapo ones Home Depot brings in every year. for $7.98.  I've had mine for at least 4 years - 2 winters in a pot on the balcony and since in the ground.

wow, nice...how big are yours getting in 1 season?   I like the hope variety, deeply split big big leaves, not like the common philodendrons I remember as a kid.   But the regular cultivar of the same species  (selloum) is beautiful and bigger, is that what you have? 

Edited by MarkbVet
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Trustandi
2 hours ago, MarkbVet said:

You think your Philodendron has any chance of survival?  Is it the 'hope' variety, supposedly root hardy to 7b?   :-)

I hope so. I was inspired by @Chester B and @Paradise Foundto plant it in the ground. We will see hehehe... I got it from HD. It was very root bound and had 2 chunky size plants. I separated them, the other one is in a big pot. 

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MarkbVet
Just now, Trustandi said:

I hope so. I was inspired by @Chester B and @Paradise Foundto plant it in the ground. We will see hehehe... I got it from HD. It was very root bound and had 2 chunky size plants. I separated them, the other one is in a big pot. 

Nice... good luck w/ it!   Plantdelights doesnt offer it anymore, but I like that species, deeply split and very large tropical leaves.  :D

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Trustandi
5 hours ago, Paradise Found said:

Here is Livistona chinensis with out to much damage, protected in pop up greenhouse with heat. 

IMG-2717.JPG

My Livistona nítida has one cold damage frond. 

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Trustandi
2 minutes ago, MarkbVet said:

Nice... good luck w/ it!   Plantdelights doesnt offer it anymore, but I like that species, deeply split and very large tropical leaves.  :D

Yes. I think I might have seen the Philodendron selloum 'hope' a couple days a go at Lowes. 

I do like the big leaves of normal selloum, it reminds me of Monstera deliciosa. 

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Chester B

The "hope" variety isn't nearly as nice as the regular one.  Hope is smaller, and not nearly as impressive.  Maybe Hope is all people can grow in zone 7, but hear in zone 8 the regular are just fine.

Mine is under my balcony so doesn't get a lot of sun so it slows its growth down but it gets a decent size by the end of summer.  I'll get another next year and put it in a sunnier spot to compare.

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MarkbVet
31 minutes ago, Trustandi said:

I hope so. I was inspired by @Chester B and @Paradise Foundto plant it in the ground. We will see hehehe... I got it from HD. It was very root bound and had 2 chunky size plants. I separated them, the other one is in a big pot. 

They remind me of Bear's Breeches a little too.  Of course, if u wanna go really big (and wet)  you could always plant a Gunnera.  :yay:

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Chester B
Just now, MarkbVet said:

They remind me of Bear's Breeches a little too.  Of course, if u wanna go really big (and wet)  you could always plant a Gunnera.  :yay:

Been there, done that.  Yanked it out last summer, not overly impressed by them, I think they really need to be planted next to a pond to look good, plus they are a slug magnet.  Every nursery here will sell them as Gunnera manicata but they never actually are, what you get 99% of the time is G. tinctoria.  True manicata are pretty hard to find.

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MarkbVet
14 minutes ago, Chester B said:

Been there, done that.  Yanked it out last summer, not overly impressed by them, I think they really need to be planted next to a pond to look good, plus they are a slug magnet.  Every nursery here will sell them as Gunnera manicata but they never actually are, what you get 99% of the time is G. tinctoria.  True manicata are pretty hard to find.

You have to provide very wet, almost boggy conditions (a pond works!) and fertilizer for them to be at their best.   Both G. manicata and G. tinctoria are large and relatively hardy.  In the right situation, they can be very impressive plants; I've seen some great specimens at the north and south coast e.g. Cannon Beach & Brookings (moist conditions there of course) but also at Farmington Gardens in Aloha (in the past... they might have re-landscaped since).  Having them at the bottom of a bowl-shaped depression with a good watering system works well... kinda the opposite of palms (except Sabal minor lol).   But yeah, they're a pain to set up in the right situation; mine never got huge due to lack of enough water (and probably sunshine) and eventually died out.  I won't replace it until I move to another place with larger yard, then will dedicate an area with a large depression that can be 'boggy'... or put it next to my pond.   Haven't given up though!

Edited by MarkbVet

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Trustandi
19 minutes ago, MarkbVet said:

They remind me of Bear's Breeches a little too.  Of course, if u wanna go really big (and wet)  you could always plant a Gunnera.  :yay:

Yes sir!

 

16 minutes ago, Chester B said:

Been there, done that.  Yanked it out last summer, not overly impressed by them, I think they really need to be planted next to a pond to look good, plus they are a slug magnet.  Every nursery here will sell them as Gunnera manicata but they never actually are, what you get 99% of the time is G. tinctoria.  True manicata are pretty hard to find.

I am kind of glad that the nursery sold the fake manicata "tinctoria", otherwise I wouldn't have any space left to plant more palm :D

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MarkbVet
31 minutes ago, Chester B said:

The "hope" variety isn't nearly as nice as the regular one.  Hope is smaller, and not nearly as impressive.  Maybe Hope is all people can grow in zone 7, but hear in zone 8 the regular are just fine.

Mine is under my balcony so doesn't get a lot of sun so it slows its growth down but it gets a decent size by the end of summer.  I'll get another next year and put it in a sunnier spot to compare.

Worth a try!  They supposedly like shade to dappled sun, not heavy sun, but with plenty of moisture they may grow better in stronger light, as you say.  Maybe morning sun?  Good experiment to compare the 2...let me know the results! 

Edited by MarkbVet

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MarkbVet
9 minutes ago, Trustandi said:

Yes sir!

 

I am kind of glad that the nursery sold the fake manicata "tinctoria", otherwise I wouldn't have any space left to plant more palm :D

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Now THAT's what i'm talkin' 'bout!!!  Boo-yah!    NICE Gunnera...and banana, and windmill (is that Wagnerianus?), and pindo palm... and..and...

Edited by MarkbVet

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Paradise Found
59 minutes ago, Trustandi said:

My Livistona nítida has one cold damage frond. 

Thats great man, I bet it will really take off this year if we don't see any super cold spells.  Well worth growing here for extra speedy growth compared to what I have. LOL!  I love the leaves of L. chinensisi. 

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Paradise Found
1 hour ago, Trustandi said:

I hope so. I was inspired by @Chester B and @Paradise Foundto plant it in the ground. We will see hehehe... I got it from HD. It was very root bound and had 2 chunky size plants. I separated them, the other one is in a big pot. 

What I have learn is to grow them in as much sun as you can give them within a protected microclimate. At least 4-6 hours of morning full sun.  Most important keep dry as possible in winter. 

Edited by Paradise Found

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MarkbVet
11 minutes ago, Paradise Found said:

What I have learn is to grow them in as much sun as you can give them within a protected microclimate. At least 4-6 hours of full sun.  Most important keep dry as possible in winter. 

For the Philodendron?   Never woulda guessed.  If that's so, then go for it @Chester B!!

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MarkbVet
53 minutes ago, Chester B said:

Been there, done that.  Yanked it out last summer, not overly impressed by them, I think they really need to be planted next to a pond to look good, plus they are a slug magnet.  Every nursery here will sell them as Gunnera manicata but they never actually are, what you get 99% of the time is G. tinctoria.  True manicata are pretty hard to find.

Ornamental Rhubarb varieties can get pretty big/tropical looking too, and may be easier in our climate.   :-)

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Paradise Found
9 minutes ago, MarkbVet said:

For the Philodendron?   Never woulda guessed.  If that's so, then go for it @Chester B!!

This is base on a big awesome philodendron in my area that grows in a big pot and has a small trunk and big leaves, I'll try and get a picture of it next week. 

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Paradise Found
4 minutes ago, MarkbVet said:

Ornamental Rhubarb varieties can get pretty big/tropical looking too, and may be easier in our climate.   :-)

That reminds me of 'Shocking Beauty' by Thomas Hobbs.

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MarkbVet
2 minutes ago, Paradise Found said:

That reminds me of 'Shocking Beauty'. 

You referring to my profile pic!  Er....no... maybe the gardening book...:blink:

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Paradise Found
1 minute ago, MarkbVet said:

You referring to my profile pic!  Er....no... maybe the gardening book...:blink:

The book. Has hardy big leaf plants in it. 

Edited by Paradise Found

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MarkbVet
3 minutes ago, Paradise Found said:

The book. Has hardy big leaf plants in it. 

Kinda figured lol.  :greenthumb:  Now you edited your comment with author name added...  so someone will read this and say 'what the hell?" Joke falls flat... thump. 

Edited by MarkbVet
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Trustandi
25 minutes ago, MarkbVet said:

Now THAT's what i'm talkin' 'bout!!!  Boo-yah!    NICE Gunnera...and banana, and windmill (is that Wagnerianus?), and pindo palm... and..and...

Thank you. It is the fortunei. Magnolia, leycesteria, buddleia, sabal minor, hardy swamp hibiscus, croscomia.

30 minutes ago, Paradise Found said:

Thats great man, I bet it will really take off this year if we don't see any super cold spells.  Well worth growing here for extra speedy growth compared to what I have. LOL!  I love the leaves of L. chinensisi. 

Right. We are not out of the woods yet. I like how the livistona chinensis puffy leaves look better than the nítida. I wish we could get Livistona boninensis. 

 

 

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MarkbVet
9 minutes ago, Trustandi said:

Thank you. It is the fortunei. Magnolia, leycesteria, buddleia, sabal minor, hardy swamp hibiscus, croscomia.

Right. We are not out of the woods yet. I like how the livistona chinensis puffy leaves look better than the nítida. I wish we could get Livistona boninensis. 

 

 

Nice!   That's NOT a typical Bellevue garden!  So that's not a big Rhododendron up against the house? 

Edited by MarkbVet

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Trustandi

Oh yes, it is Rhody. :floor: PNW' fav! 

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Paradise Found
13 minutes ago, Trustandi said:

Oh yes, it is Rhody. :floor: PNW' fav! 

I thought it was going to be a big leaf Rhody. LOL! do you have one?

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Trustandi

It is on my list - rhododendron sinogrande but I get sidetracked with agaves and sabals.

 

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MarkbVet
12 minutes ago, Trustandi said:

It is on my list - rhododendron sinogrande but I get sidetracked with agaves and sabals.

 

Haven't seen one in person; tell me what you think if you do get one.  My aunt had a rhody that was as tall as her 2 story house, had to cut it back 4 feet each year, basal trunk a foot thick.  Tried to get a cutting and failed to get it to root.  She and my uncle had dug it as a small plant in the coastal range mountains, back in the 1940's when no one cared.  There is a 'tree rhododendron' available online with typical looking rhody leaves/flowers, but supposedly gets up to 100 feet tall in the wild.  Wonder if it would look/act any different than typical rhodys in our neck of the woods (supposedly is hardy enough). 

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Chester B

I have a lone R sinogrande. I tried to kill it with sunshine so moved it to a much better spot. It’s still small so the leaves are big but not yet enormous. When they need water they let you know as the leaves droop. Essentially not too sunny, moist conditions and of course the ubiquitous “well draining soil”. Seems to grow at a reasonable pace. This year now that I have it in ideal conditions I’m curious to see how it does. That heat dome last year did a lot of damage. 

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Paradise Found
1 hour ago, Paradise Found said:

This is base on a big awesome philodendron in my area that grows in a big pot and has a small trunk and big leaves, I'll try and get a picture of it next week. 

Here is a picture from last winter after the big storm with cold temps.  Picture is from February 2021 I believe. It is growing in a pot that is keep dry in winter and has a large overhang above it. And lots of parking lot heat and faces south. A true microclimate. 

IMG-0128.thumb.jpg.40faebc0358f3c999fb25e26bfb609e5.jpg

Edited by Paradise Found
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MarkbVet
21 minutes ago, Chester B said:

I have a lone R sinogrande. I tried to kill it with sunshine so moved it to a much better spot. It’s still small so the leaves are big but not yet enormous. When they need water they let you know as the leaves droop. Essentially not too sunny, moist conditions and of course the ubiquitous “well draining soil”. Seems to grow at a reasonable pace. This year now that I have it in ideal conditions I’m curious to see how it does. That heat dome last year did a lot of damage. 

Yeah 117F will do that.   I was dumb enough (unlucky enough) to plant some new shrubs etc the week before the heat wave.  Plants got a big singed, even with daily hosing.  Survived though!  Bet your monster will take off once established.

 

Edited by MarkbVet

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Chester B
3 minutes ago, MarkbVet said:

Yeah 117F will do that.   I was dumb enough (unlucky enough) to plant some new shrubs etc the week before the heat wave.  Plants got a big singed, even with daily hosing.  Survived though!

 

I sent a few plants to the compost. Nothing died but I had some that always looked bad mid summer. This was my first year of being ruthless in the garden. My front yard is very heat and drought tolerant but my backyard not as much. I plan on transitioning to more heat and drought tolerant back there as well. I lost all my canopy trees so the sun can be relentless at times. 

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MarkbVet
2 minutes ago, Chester B said:

I sent a few plants to the compost. Nothing died but I had some that always looked bad mid summer. This was my first year of being ruthless in the garden. My front yard is very heat and drought tolerant but my backyard not as much. I plan on transitioning to more heat and drought tolerant back there as well. I lost all my canopy trees so the sun can be relentless at times. 

Good for palms and desert plants.  *wink*

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MarkbVet
43 minutes ago, MarkbVet said:

Haven't seen one in person; tell me what you think if you do get one.  My aunt had a rhody that was as tall as her 2 story house, had to cut it back 4 feet each year, basal trunk a foot thick.  Tried to get a cutting and failed to get it to root.  She and my uncle had dug it as a small plant in the coastal range mountains, back in the 1940's when no one cared.  There is a 'tree rhododendron' available online with typical looking rhody leaves/flowers, but supposedly gets up to 100 feet tall in the wild.  Wonder if it would look/act any different than typical rhodys in our neck of the woods (supposedly is hardy enough).  species is Rhododendron arboreum.

 

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Jesse PNW

After snow and a week of rain... comes floods.  Lots of roads and sections of highway are shut down.  What strange times we live in.   This area hasn't flooded since 1996, and isn't supposed to be in the 200 year floodplain.  

 

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Chester B

I saw your video - totally crazy!  Lots of flooding shown on the news tonight through SW Washington. They’re saying it should start receding. 

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Swolte

Holy crap, @Jesse PNW are you (and your palms) OK?

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Jesse PNW

@@Swolte I think we're good.  Appears water has stopped rising.  I think 2 of my neighbors got very lucky, water is up to their doors but I don't think water is actually in their homes.  Garages are flooded though.   

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