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elsi

Kentia palm - is it over-potted?

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elsi

I bought Kentia palm in 22cm pot (the photo in a box).  I repotted the Kentia into 33cm pot  as the original pot was broken.

I haven't touch much the root and kept the surrounding old soil.  Only put new soil around it. 

I used Plant mix (Kings House Plant Mix - 10l | Compost and Mixes | Kings)   about 8 litre.  

It has been only one day since repotting.  

I am a bit scared if I used too big pot.  It seems like more pale and yellowish leaves with wet top soil.

How long should I wait to see if the top soil and deep soil dry? 

Should I leave it outside (under the sun with roof) to dry or bring the plant inside? I will use indoor 43cm cache-pot.

And why some leaves are wide and crumpled? 

Should I take the small dry branch at the bottom off? why is it dry? (When I bought this Kentia,  this dry leave were there)

Thanks to help this complete beginner.

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D. Morrowii

The pot size is fine I think but you’ll want to remove that saucer from the bottom so the roots wont rot. The potting soil should drain very quickly and remain moist without being soggy. The pot should have at least one or multiple holes to allow extra water to drain away. You can check for moisture regularly and water as needed 

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PalmsandLiszt

That's really pale for a kentia. Were they all that colour when you bought it?

The dry leaf looks like natural senescence of a very old leaf and nothing to worry about. Anything dry and crispy can be cut off without harming the plant.

Not familiar with your potting mix as I'm on the other side of the world, but I'd amend any general-purpose mix with perlite/pumice/bark chips/etc. as they never seem to be free-draining enough for palm or cycads, whatever they claim.

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elsi
On 11/25/2021 at 2:51 PM, D. Morrowii said:

The pot size is fine I think but you’ll want to remove that saucer from the bottom so the roots wont rot. The potting soil should drain very quickly and remain moist without being soggy. The pot should have at least one or multiple holes to allow extra water to drain away. You can check for moisture regularly and water as needed 

Yes, the colour was like when I bought few days ago.  The colour seems a bit pale despite being outdoor in the shop.  

Thank you, PalmsandLiszt.  Next time,  I will remember to mix the potting mix with other stuff for sufficient drainage. 

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elsi
On 11/25/2021 at 2:51 PM, D. Morrowii said:

The pot size is fine I think but you’ll want to remove that saucer from the bottom so the roots wont rot. The potting soil should drain very quickly and remain moist without being soggy. The pot should have at least one or multiple holes to allow extra water to drain away. You can check for moisture regularly and water as needed 

D. Morrowii. Do you think so? Phew... that's a relief. :)

I didn't put the saucer when I was watering and waiting to drain the water out of pot. 

The pot has many holes but the volume of soil seems to keep the moisture long time. 

That makes me to worry. 

Lol...however, I bought a soil moisture tester.  awaiting to be delivered. 

I cannot wait to see if this soils keeps moisture long time.

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Rickybobby

I would have left it in the original pot. Or the same size but decorative. Until the roots bust out they are just fine in smaller pots. Just make sure the soil doesn’t stay soggy. Nice area where do you live??

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piping plovers

I try to pot in a container that is approximately 1 inch larger around the existing rootball.  If you can’t find something immediately then following advice of the other posters here ( fast draining medium, empty the saucer, water when approaching dry) should protect you from root rot in the meantime. Looks like a robust kentia for that size.

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elsi
On 12/5/2021 at 7:40 AM, piping plovers said:

I try to pot in a container that is approximately 1 inch larger around the existing rootball.  If you can’t find something immediately then following advice of the other posters here ( fast draining medium, empty the saucer, water when approaching dry) should protect you from root rot in the meantime. Looks like a robust kentia for that size.

This is day 19 post watering. The moisture indicator showed 7 which mean 'need watering' (-when below 8 for Kentia).  But the soil seems still lots of moisture in it. 
And this one leaf showed yellowish with curved shape.  Do you think it required repotting to small pot? 

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oasis371

It's a bit of a balancing act with most palms, none will appreciate their roots to dry out, NONE, however, most need an excellent, fast draining mix. So, I aim for mixes and pot sizes that dry out sooner rather than later. Better to plant in a pot and mix that needs more frequent watering, than infrequent. I use a lot of orchid bark, and perlite in my palm soil mixes and keep the pots on the smallish size. I am in Northern Hemisphere, Zone 7 climate (so it is the darkest part of winter now), but still, the palms get a lot of winter sun as they sit in southern and eastern windows. I water just about once a week.  I lost a large Howea a couple of years ago,  due to excessive soil moisture in the winter, so I learned my lesson big time.  Good luck!

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piping plovers
34 minutes ago, elsi said:

But the soil seems still lots of moisture in it. 
And this one leaf showed yellowish with curved sh

I don’t use the soil meters so I’m not too familiar with them.  I got familiar with what a freshly watered pot felt like by lifting the pot right after watering and then when it felt light in weight I’d water it thoroughly until it drained; empty the saucer. 

 

8 minutes ago, oasis371 said:

So, I am for mixes and pot sizes that dry out sooner rather than later. Better to plant in a pot and mix that needs more frequent watering, than infrequent. I use a lot of orchid bark, and perlite in my palm soil mixes and keep the pots on the smallish size. I

What Oasis posted is what I follow also, i lost a Howea 20  years ago by over watering too.  Not making that mistake again.  Not sure if you got peat moss in there….but if you do make sure to amend with approx 2/3 mix with fast draining media, stuff like what Oasis mentioned and/or also leca clay pellets.  Peat based soil mix should be 1/3 or less of your mix.  
 

My Howeas have to beg for water in winter, right now the pot sizes and mixes are such that they require water once a week only and they are thirsty on day seven.

 

i know it’s frustrating but I’ve learned to error on side of underwatering. I’m going through this with my cherished $$$ Joey palm that I screwed up watering because it was too deep in the sunroom for me to properly do the lifting test , I got lazy and I don’t know if I overwatered or underwatered weeks ago. I’m on pins and needles checking it but am keeping it on dry side because that’s safer than error ing on the wet side for most indoor palms in winter.

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oasis371

I just wanted to add, that the mix seen in the pic does look peaty. Peat has two problems that make it a problem if it dominates a mix. 

1.) It can stay wet for two long, especially under indoor conditions after a thorough watering.

2.) It becomes extremely hydrophobic once it does dry, ESPECIALLY OUTDOORS in the SUN.

All my plants basically go out in the warmer months for (March-December for some of the hardiest). Howeas go out from about late April - October where they get some morning sun or otherwise filtered sun the rest of the day.  I really see a big growth spurt when they are outside and don't worry about water at that time of year. (We got 30 inches of rain from July to September and they were fine).  But indoors, in the winter, I cut way back on watering, as I did once lose a large specimen due to overwatering in the winter/indoors. I see that the OP is in New Zealand so summer and if your mix is too retentive of moisture and it's indoors, it could be a problem.  I would suggest you amend the soil by taking it out of its pot gently brushing off some of the current soil and amending with orchid bark, perlite and maybe some coarse sand or other available materials to lighten the mix and lessen your anxiety about overwatering. Lighter mixes also hold more oxygen and palm roots are also oxygen loving. 

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