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Plantking165

Cold damage on my coconut palm?

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Plantking165

So recently we have been hitting the low 50s and an occasional 45 to 48 at night and my coconut palm is showing severe yellowing with brown spots all over it. I'm not sure if it's a disease or the cool weather that is causing it ill show pics below of what it looked like in September vs now. The last pic it has yellow patches all over I have no idea why.

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kinzyjr
37 minutes ago, Plantking165 said:

So recently we have been hitting the low 50s and an occasional 45 to 48 at night and my coconut palm is showing severe yellowing with brown spots all over it. I'm not sure if it's a disease or the cool weather that is causing it ill show pics below of what it looked like in September vs now. The last pic it has yellow patches all over I have no idea why.

It's chill damage from the prolonged cool.  Getting heating cables for the ground can help if the damage is because the soil temperature has gone below 60F.  If you want to minimize the foliage damage in its formative years, get some C9 Christmas lights and wrap it.  Make sure the bulbs don't touch the trunk or leaf bases.  I've not used the Christmas lights before, but the way this year is looking, it may not be a bad idea.

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Plantking165

Yeah I was gonna get an extension cord and a heating cable and wrap the trunk with the heating cable. and put a tarp over the tree to seal in tbe heat. I don't think the heating cables will harm tbe trunk or leaves what do you think? It's odd that the tree is showing alot of damage most days get into the 50s and 60s at night with daytime Temps from 70 to 80. 

Edited by Plantking165

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Plantking165

See here's the recent weather we're having, enough to cause the damage I'm seeing 

Screenshot_20211120-013842_Weather.jpg

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Jimbean

The damage should be mild.  As long as you have consistent day time highs in the 70's and your lows stay above 40F, you should be fine. 

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Plantking165

The brown spots all over it is that a part of potassium deficiency or fungal disease?

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Mr. Coconut Palm
39 minutes ago, Plantking165 said:

The brown spots all over it is that a part of potassium deficiency or fungal disease?

Potassium deficiency.  Coconut in Florida and in South Texas develop this this time of year.  Liquid Seaweed helps as a foliar spray, or any good organic foliar spray.  I use MicroLife Ocean Harvest 4-2-3 as a foliar spray on mine a few times throughout the late fall and winter, along with MicroLife Ultimate 8-4-6 as a granular slow release fertilizer at the root zone (applied 4 times per year in mid February, mid May, mid August, and mid November).  Some varieties are more susceptible to Potassium deficienccy and cool/cold injury than others.  Yours appears to be a Golden Malayan Dwarf, and they along with the Yellow Malayan Dwarfs are more susceptible than the Green Malayan Dwarfs, Jamaican Talls, Panama Talls, and Maypans are.

John

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Plantking165

Yes mine is a yellow malayan dawrf. I just had to be sure because I know it has a few leaf spot issues before this.  and I really didn't want this to be another disease that it has. It's even on the new leaves up top spreading from the top down the leaves it just looks really bad considering we stay in the 50s and 60s at night 

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kinzyjr

I agree with @Mr. Coconut Palm on the various cultivars.  Overall, I'd say that my Maypan is the most care-free at my location, followed closely by Jamaican Tall.  My garden does not currently have a Panama Tall, but I am told they hold less fronds over the winter than their Jamaican Tall counterparts.  If any of mine perish, I might replace it with a Panama Tall just to see what they do.

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Plantking165

If mine comes out and starts growing well in the spring and summer I might add a Jamaican tall or west coast tall somthing like that although I don't know where to find any of the different varieties I always see darwfs for sale.

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kinzyjr
1 hour ago, Plantking165 said:

If mine comes out and starts growing well in the spring and summer I might add a Jamaican tall or west coast tall somthing like that although I don't know where to find any of the different varieties I always see darwfs for sale.

If we don't get anything nasty this winter, it should be fine with just cosmetic damage.  I get mine from Calusa Palms: http://www.calusapalmsnursery.com/ProductList.html

You can call or email them and they can put one aside for you for curbside pickup or bring one to a show for you.  The show at Edison this weekend is a pretty good haul.  The one at Florida Botanical Gardens in Largo next month is a much shorter drive, so I may head over and get a Panama Tall then.

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Plantking165

They have some nice ones definitely by summer depending on how this one I have is doing because it has its own issues I wouldn't wanna spread it to a new one I got. But if all goes well I might have to get a Panama tall or red spicata from them. 

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Mr. Coconut Palm
On 11/20/2021 at 10:54 PM, Plantking165 said:

If mine comes out and starts growing well in the spring and summer I might add a Jamaican tall or west coast tall somthing like that although I don't know where to find any of the different varieties I always see darwfs for sale.

Jacob,

There are some nurseries in South Florida and South Central Florida that carry Maypans and Panama Talls.  You will just have to look around to see which ones carry what.  In the case of the Jamaican Tall, due to Lethal Yellowing disease, nurseries quit carrying them decades ago, but don't let this stop you from getting one, since they are the most cold hardy variety in your area, and the disease from what I can tell has pretty much run its course over there compared to how bad it used to be back in the 1970's and '80's.  Now, I think it is much more sporadic than it was back then, and there seems to be some natural genetic strains of the Jamaican Talls that seemed to have some degree of natural resistance to the disease, as when I lived in Coral Springs and would travel around South Florida back in 2000 and 2001, I would see healthy mature Jamaican Talls that showed no signs of the disease whatsoever and that did not have antitbiotic injectors in the trunks to keep them alive that many had in their trunks.  Anyway, look for healthy sprouted nuts beneath healthy mature Jamaican Talls along the beaches in Central and South Central Florida, at some public parks, etc.  Sometimes, you can even find healthy mature Jamaican Talls growing in vaccant lots, and you may be able to find viable ripe nuts beneath them that you can sprout, or already sprouted nuts growing beneath them.  There are two healthy mature Jamaican Talls growing at Kopsick in the St. Petersburg area, that people get good viable nuts from, and there are probably some people on here that could send you a sprouted Jamaican Tall nut.  But let me caution you with this.  I had a beautiful, healthy Jamaican Tall that was sent to me from Florida several years ago, and I killed it by transplanting it too early.  I came to find out that they, unlike other varieties, do not like to have their roots messed with when they are young, so if you get one, plant it straight into the ground in the spring where you want to grow it, or pot it up in a large enough pot that it can grow in for a couple of years till it's about 8ft. or 9ft. tall in overall height, and then plant it in the ground.

John  

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Plantking165

See I love coconut palms I had one when I was a little younger frost killed it i was like 12 or something but im back now to try it again. I would try getting another one now and overwinter on cold nights inside plant it out in spring but I'm too concerned with the current health of my coconut, because all the spots on it reminds me of a severe leaf diseases or coconut seedling blight it's spreading quick too from from tip down the leaf.

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Mr. Coconut Palm
4 hours ago, Plantking165 said:

See I love coconut palms I had one when I was a little younger frost killed it i was like 12 or something but im back now to try it again. I would try getting another one now and overwinter on cold nights inside plant it out in spring but I'm too concerned with the current health of my coconut, because all the spots on it reminds me of a severe leaf diseases or coconut seedling blight it's spreading quick too from from tip down the leaf.

From the photos you provided and description, it just sounds like Potassium deficiency.  I get it on all my Coconut Palms here, both in the ground and ones in pots too, to varying degrees, based on variety, size, overall healthy of the palm, etc.  Some get it worse than others.  Prolonged warm weather, usually cures it, but as we are heading into winter, it will continue to varying degrees throughout the winter.  Severe cases of it can kill palms,  but it is not contagious, so one palm WILL NOT give it to another palm.  It is a nutritional deficiency brought on by chilly/cold weather, and NOT a disease, even though it may initially appear as a disease, as multiple Coconut Palms and other susceptible palms can have the condition at the same time, giving the appearance that it is a rapidly spreading disease, when it is not.  I assure you, it is strictly a condition in the palms brought on by extended cool/chilly weather.  Some varieties can develop it after just one or two nights of cool to chilly weather, while other varieties won't even be affected at all at the same time!  To cure it (affected leaves will remain ugly and not recover, but as long as they have green on them, don't cut them off, as palms need as much green foliage as possible to produce photosynthesis), and to prevent it from occurring in the first place, or from recurring later on, use Liquid Seaweed according to the directions as a foliar spray, and use MicroLife Ocean Harvest 4-2-3 as a foliar spray several times throughout the late fall and winter, and even into the early spring, then a couple of times throughout the rest of the year, to help with palm health.

John

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Plantking165

Alright ill definitely order some of the foliar spray. I can't wait for next year because my palm is moving from the seedling stage to having full fronds developed just a few more fronds and it will be out of the seedling stage.

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Plantking165

This is what I got for the potassium deficiency hopefully it will do the trick.Screenshot_20211124-142212_Chrome.thumb.jpg.79caaaf18f62315707716dbad209ae8c.jpg

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Plantking165

@kinzyjr I think I'm going to call that place and have them bring down a coconut to the show on the 11th idk what one I want yet I was thinking the red spicata or a Fiji dawrf how big are the ones in a 7 gallon. There are a few I want on this list but I'm gonna choose 1

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kinzyjr
11 minutes ago, Plantking165 said:

@kinzyjr I think I'm going to call that place and have them bring down a coconut to the show on the 11th idk what one I want yet I was thinking the red spicata or a Fiji dawrf how big are the ones in a 7 gallon. There are a few I want on this list but I'm gonna choose 1

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A 7G is usually somewhere in the neighborhood of 6-10 feet in overall height unless noted diffrently.  I typically get the 3G since I have a compact car.  I'm not sure about the typical hardiness you could expect from those varieties you mentioned in particular.  The Fiji Dwarf only gets about 4-8 feet of trunk and has a very wide crown.  You'll need some room around it.  For cold tolerance, the Atlantic Tall, Pacific Tall and Green Malayan are typically the way to go (typically in that order).  The Pacific Tall may have a small advantage for a longer chilly spell vs. a shorter and more intense cold spell, but I haven't tried one yet.  I'll probably ride over and get a Panama Tall 3G just to see how it does here.

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Plantking165

It says they have 3g Panama tall for 15 bucks and 6 to 7ft that's great I might get that one or the 7g Fiji dawrf ima call them tomorrow and inquire about them ask for pics too I always like to see things before I buy etc.

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Plantking165

Well I found a proper comparison for what's wrong with my palm take a close look at the circle shaped spots on both of these no idea what disease it is they didn't name it unfortunately 

Screenshot_20211125-180556_Gallery.jpg

Screenshot_20211125-180533_Gallery.jpg

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kinzyjr
4 hours ago, Plantking165 said:

Well I found a proper comparison for what's wrong with my palm take a close look at the circle shaped spots on both of these no idea what disease it is they didn't name it unfortunately

Were you thinking it was a leaf spot? https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/PP142

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Plantking165

Bipolairis incurvata almost seems to have a matching description of how it spreads and works it says at Temps 68 or lower it spreads quick. And higher Temps around 90 it is not conducive to its spread. This leaf disease isn't one that affects just lower leaves it also affects the canopy and new leaves, so that explains why I see it worse on some of the newer leaves than the older ones.

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AZ_Palm_Guy

@Plantking165 have you thought of making a small pvc enclosure for it? Your palm is small enough you can place it on it overnight and take off during that day. Your enclosure can be made of pvc and use dewitt frost fabric on the outside to keep it protected from the cold. Here is mine so you can kind of get an idea of what I'm talking about. 

20211128_105055.jpg

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GottmitAlex
22 minutes ago, AZ_Palm_Guy said:

@Plantking165 have you thought of making a small pvc enclosure for it? Your palm is small enough you can place it on it overnight and take off during that day. Your enclosure can be made of pvc and use dewitt frost fabric on the outside to keep it protected from the cold. Here is mine so you can kind of get an idea of what I'm talking about. 

20211128_105055.jpg

Kinda like this but with PVC:

 

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Plantking165

Yeah I was thinking of making somthing like that 

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julie42
On 11/19/2021 at 10:20 PM, kinzyjr said:

It's chill damage from the prolonged cool.  Getting heating cables for the ground can help if the damage is because the soil temperature has gone below 60F.  If you want to minimize the foliage damage in its formative years, get some C9 Christmas lights and wrap it.  Make sure the bulbs don't touch the trunk or leaf bases.  I've not used the Christmas lights before, but the way this year is looking, it may not be a bad idea.

I am agree with you. this is due to cold weather.

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kinzyjr
14 hours ago, julie42 said:

I am agree with you. this is due to cold weather.

Thank you for chiming in and welcome to PalmTalk!

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