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Paradise Found

Any Ti plants root hardy to z8

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Paradise Found

I've heard that Red Sister is hardy to z8 can anyone back that up? Thanks.

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Paradise Found

Looks like it will come back from the roots only in warmer z8, (southern state) and TX.

Oh Well, still makes a good house plant in winter. 

The reason I was asking is one nursery is saying it hardy to zone 8, in HI. 

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DAVEinMB

@Paradise Found I'm trying some, I'll let you know how they do this winter

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Edited by DAVEinMB
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Paradise Found

Hey Dave, fantastic looking Ti plant. :greenthumb:  I have one similar called black magic, to much sun and it goes from black to green.  

Yours is rocking that placement. Good contrast with the yucca. Looks really protected. You do have a pretty good microclimate, so it's got a good chance of making it... depending on weather, duration, whether you protect it.

Does the AC give off any heat in winter or coolness?

Dave's garden has some people in z8 saying theirs grow back from the roots every year with 'Red Sister'. 

I look forward to seeing how it does after winter.

Thanks for sharing your pics!

Edited by Paradise Found

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DAVEinMB
15 hours ago, Paradise Found said:

Hey Dave, fantastic looking Ti plant. :greenthumb:  I have one similar called black magic, to much sun and it goes from black to green.  

Yours is rocking that placement. Good contrast with the yucca. Looks really protected. You do have a pretty good microclimate, so it's got a good chance of making it... depending on weather, duration, whether you protect it.

Does the AC give off any heat in winter or coolness?

Dave's garden has some people in z8 saying theirs grow back from the roots every year with 'Red Sister'. 

I look forward to seeing how it does after winter.

Thanks for sharing your pics!

Thanks man, the leaves of the fruticosa are similar in shape to the yucca cane so I thought the purple/red would complement the grouping nicely. This area has a ton of wind protection and canopy and is also where I'm trying chamaedorea cataractum and strelitzia nikolai

The other planting where the ac unit is has decent canopy but it is more exposed to wind. I don't think the ac unit gives off much heat but a banana plant right next to it stays greener longer than some of my other perennials so it can't be hurting. I got a $12 queen planted in the same area that just came through its first winter in the ground without protection and had no burn. 

I've seen quite a few red sisters planted around town (mostly at hotels) but I'm not sure if they're being treated as annuals or are coming back every year. I'll have to keep my eye on them this winter and report back :D

Also because everyone likes pictures here's a couple more of the ac area. That pine straw wasn't put down by me, that's a byproduct of the natural canopy in that area :shaka-2:

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joe_OC

I would not recommend Red Sister.  It is one of the most common, but if it does not get the right climate, it dies pretty easily.

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Paradise Found

Dave, looks like you're all set for some interesting plant experiments. Love the queen. You'll have good luck with that than I would. I do have a hardy BxQ and its never had much damage thanks to the overhead protection. About the same height as your queen but with a much thicker trunk. 

I look forward to seeing how they all do and how the Ti plants do around town. 

Good Luck!

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mnorell

Most of my Cordyline terminalis would come back every year after hard freezes in Natchez, Mississippi (humid subtropical, 9a). This included long, hard freezes such as 2010 (three days below freezing, to 18F low) and 2018 (13F snap). Even the fabulous 'Peter Buck' would come back every year. Some were better than others at growing back, others stayed quite small because, though they were never killed at the roots, they couldn't get much size each season. But a few did keep decent size, some of course would stay up in warmer years (when lows hit 26-27 minimum and under some sort of evergreen canopy or overhang). They really didn't mind the chill of of the Deep South winter in wet soil, even in deep shade/northern exposure, so they are really much tougher than some people think, as long as winter doesn't go on too long. On the other hand, the Pacific Northwest has 8-9 months of that chill as opposed to the three months experienced in the warmer 8b and 9a (south of US84) Gulf areas. I've heard stories of people in coastal San Diego County having trouble with certain very sensitive types of Ti keeping going after the long, chilly winter and "spring" year after year, so moving up in latitude along the Alaskan Current to the Oregon/Washington areas might be a stretch for many of them. On the other hand, you would probably have much better luck with some of the cool-loving species such as Cordyline stricta, which gives a very similar effect in the landscape. I think you should find the warmest spot up against your house and go ahead and plant 'Red Sister' or any of the others, for that matter, that don't break the bank. 'Red Sister' and many others are dime-a-dozen landscape/houseplant material at the Big Box stores, so why not give some a try? And cut a few canes before your first frost, put their bases in moss in large ziploc bags for the winter, and make some backup plants for the following season. Good luck with your trials!

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Paradise Found

If you protect ( I think you should) wrap with frost cloth before it gets cold, and after the cold spell take off.

At least protect the roots. While the soil is warm put a 6" layer of leave, compost, something to help the roots stay warm.  Take away the mulch come spring.  That's one way to get them to regrow from the roots. 

It said that the darker leaf ones are the hardiest. 

If you use the box store make sure they don't have really thin trunks. 

Good luck with the Trial. 

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DAVEinMB

@Paradise Found here's one of the hotel plantings I was talking about. I'm in this part of town a lot so I'll be keeping an eye on them through the winter months

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Paradise Found

Thanks Dave, those look great and loving your climate.  Will be interesting to see how they do come winter/spring. 

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Paradise Found
4 hours ago, Paradise Found said:

Thanks Dave, those look great and loving your climate.  Will be interesting to see how they do come winter/spring. 

Also thank you so much for taking the time to photo shoot these and for any updates in the future. Thank You!

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DAVEinMB
20 minutes ago, Paradise Found said:

Also thank you so much for taking the time to photo shoot these and for any updates in the future. Thank You!

Absolutely! My overall palm/tropical venture has been really enjoyable and I find myself noticing plantings like this more and more. If I can contribute something I'm happy to :shaka-2:

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