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Christopher Dillman

Need SoCal palm suggestion for upper wall planting

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Christopher Dillman

Many thanks for the insights on this board. Special thanks to @PalmatierMeg for identifying this palm's condition.

Looking for advice on a 30 gal or 45 gal palm size to go in the place of this stunted queen. This will be planted in Southern California, around Oct.

Something that can grow to get 'bushy' and provide good coverage, not get taller than 6 or 7 ft OAS.

In a spot where it will get full sun from morning till eve.

This wall is being replaced with cinder block concrete. I love the Jubaea in this spot, but worried the trunk over time will get too bulbous and risk pushing it out. Maybe I'm wrong.

Open for ideas and favorites!

Christopher 

20210907_091447.jpg

Edited by Christopher Dillman

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aztropic

Pygmy date palm triple.

 

aztropic

Mesa, Arizona

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ahosey01

Phil Bergman at Jungle music has a Phoenix acaulis for sale currently.  Similar to a pygmy date, but rarer, shrubbier and tougher.  I prefer them - I have two.  Will never get tall, but will look nice, stay small and won’t push anything out.  You’re right about a Jubaea.

Edited by ahosey01
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TomJ

Clumping Dypsis fits the bill.

Can control height and span by trimming/removing.

Dypsis Lutescens easiest to source.

Dypsis Pembana easiest to grow.

Dypsis Onilahensis 

etc...etc....

 

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Christopher Dillman
1 hour ago, TomJ said:

Clumping Dypsis fits the bill.

Can control height and span by trimming/removing.

Dypsis Lutescens easiest to source.

Dypsis Pembana easiest to grow.

Dypsis Onilahensis 

etc...etc....

 

Really liking the Dypsis Lutescens..

Any personal experiences growing it here in North County SD? Also known as a bamboo palm I see... does it spread like bamboo?

I would consider a clump of two or three of these to cover my upper wall area. Looks to be root friendly for retaining walls.

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Darold Petty

Arenga engleri would be very dense and not taller than your specification, however unlikey to find one so large.

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idesign123
2 hours ago, TomJ said:

Clumping Dypsis fits the bill...

 

I personally like the idea of clumping dypsis in that spot. If you haven't spent time on the "Palms for California" website yet, you should definitely check it out. The Jungle Music website also has great info on palms for our climate specifically. Here are the two pages on Lutescens (which you can find in most nurseries)...
http://www.palmpedia.net/palmsforcal/Dypsis_lutescens
https://www.junglemusic.net/The_Areca_Palm/The_Areca_Palm.html

On Lutescens, the main decision is to let it grow thick & bushy, which is great for places you want "screening".  Or you can periodically thin it out so show off the attractive orange-tinted trunks. I personally prefer the latter treatment.

Alternatively you can go with one of the less common clumping dypsis... the ones mentioned above are great. I'd also add Dypsis 'lafamazanga' & Dypsis lanciolata. I just planted some lanceolatea in an area I want to add some screening (they're still quite small).

IMG_9685.thumb.jpeg.a17ff311dd254f1687060729be971856.jpeg

And here's one of my "lafamazanga'... again small, but really colorful...

IMG_9877.thumb.jpeg.0646b4986719bd17a4af85e288a795dc.jpeg

For our climate, I'd also put Dypsis leptocheilos (teddy bear palm) and Chambeyronia macrocarpa (flamethrower) on your "must have" list. My garden is relatively new, but feel free to come by sometime if you'd like. Most of mine are relatively young, but I have a few larger specimens.

My lutescens aren't big enough to show off yet, but I *think* these are lutescens that I was drooling over at the Catamaran Hotel last week (not unusual, but can still be attractive is you keep them thinned out).

lutescens.jpeg.4d727a4cda24f1a04daff023a15ec378.jpeg

Edited by idesign123
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idesign123

I'm apparently more interested in your yard than my real work today. Three quick mockups...

Lutescens (often called "Areca Palm", though not in Areca family):


lutescensoption.jpg.3c2e83ebfa34a4ac7591d1af11f97ad8.jpg

Chambeyronia macrocarpa ("flamethrower")

flame.jpg.6d8acfb655de7e3da5bb77da5f13699a.jpg

Dypsis leptocheilos ("Teddy Bear"):

teddy.jpg.946d12c173a19e6ac24e4f1ee5a7fda6.jpg

All better than Queen Palms, which I can say with confidence after removing 8 Queens from my yard.

As for the skinny slot by the fence, if that's giant bird of paradise, remove it ASAP. I love them, but that's not enough space for their expanding base. I do have them (and they're a lot of maintenance), but only put those where there's lots of room, and use them where you need major screening).

For the spot by the fence (assuming you want to fill it), I'd personally look into Rhaphis or Bamboo Palm. Here's some Chamadorea costaricana I'm using in a very thin planter which is also quite hot. A couple of the leaves got a bit of brown tips this summer, but seem to be thriving otherwise (and lots of babies growing from the base). 

IMG_9881.thumb.jpeg.138fd25ddf53b72a59c901dec781647f.jpeg

Have fun!

Edited by idesign123
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GottmitAlex
27 minutes ago, idesign123 said:

I'm apparently more interested in your yard than my real work today. Three quick mockups...

Lutescens (often called "Areca Palm", though not in Areca family):


lutescensoption.jpg.3c2e83ebfa34a4ac7591d1af11f97ad8.jpg

Chambeyronia macrocarpa ("flamethrower")

flame.jpg.6d8acfb655de7e3da5bb77da5f13699a.jpg

Dypsis leptocheilos ("Teddy Bear"):

teddy.jpg.946d12c173a19e6ac24e4f1ee5a7fda6.jpg

All better than Queen Palms, which I can say with confidence after removing 8 Queens from my yard.

As for the skinny slot by the fence, if that's giant bird of paradise, remove it ASAP. I love them, but that's not enough space for their expanding base. I do have them (and they're a lot of maintenance), but only put those where there's lots of room, and use them where you need major screening).

For the spot by the fence (assuming you want to fill it), I'd personally look into Rhaphis or Bamboo Palm. Here's some Chamadorea costaricana I'm using in a very thin planter which is also quite hot. A couple of the leaves got a bit of brown tips this summer, but seem to be thriving otherwise (and lots of babies growing from the base). 

IMG_9881.thumb.jpeg.138fd25ddf53b72a59c901dec781647f.jpeg

Have fun!

Those three pictures look like the real deal!! Love your creative design skills! 

 

 

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idesign123
2 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

Those three pictures look like the real deal!! Love your creative design skills! 

 

 

Thanks! Was super easy to do since I already have those ones "masked out" in Photoshop from my own yard mockups. The colorful clump at the base just represents the idea of putting lots of random color around the base... not recommendations for any plant in particular. Though I do have both the "Queen Emma Lily" and "Brahea Decumbens" ones in my real-life yard... as well as a bazillion bromeliads (you can never have too many bromeliads).

Seriously, there are soooo many options for that particular space. If it were me, I'd put a "Tribear" there, but those are still hard to come by.  If he wants instant gratification, maybe buy a larger (expensive) flamethrower from Rancho Soledad, since they do get large ones periodically. Or like the rest of us start small and dream of what it will look like years from now (lol).

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msporty

Your first order of business should be fixing the issues that lead to this palm’s decline. The soil looks bone dry and devoid of organic material. Since it’s a terraced area, it will need more water. I have no experience with railroad ties, but I don’t know if leached chemicals are detrimental to palms. You could spend a pretty penny on a replacement palm, only to see it suffer a worse fate than this queen palm. I’ve seen many new plantings fail for this reason!

 

My vote would be Dypsis lutescens. They’re tropical, easy to grow, and readily available. If it’s sunny enough, you could plant a Bismarckia nobilis. If you want something maintenance free, but less tropical, maybe a Brahea or Butia. 

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DoomsDave

@Christopher Dillman nice to meet you!

Everyone's given you a banquet for thought, and I have a few questions:

1. How rigid is that six or seven foot height requirement?

2. Do you have wires etc., overhead?

3. What's your red-line money wise?

I ask, because that will help put your choices into better perspective. If you have a really rigid height requirement some of the plants suggested will get bigger.

Also, come to the PSSC meeting a week from Saturday. If you can't maybe charter a fun bus and come visit my garden with a few North Countians . . .

In any case, please advise and so nice to meet you.

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NorCalWill

I'm confused when you say you want a palm no more than 6' or 7' tall, but you also considered a Jubaea...

For an all day sunny location, I'd find a big Chamaerops humilis 'Cerifera', or Brahea decumbens, which you won't find very big. Both would close to your height requirement.

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ahosey01
45 minutes ago, NorCalWill said:

I'm confused when you say you want a palm no more than 6' or 7' tall, but you also considered a Jubaea...

For an all day sunny location, I'd find a big Chamaerops humilis 'Cerifera', or Brahea decumbens, which you won't find very big. Both would close to your height requirement.

X1000 for Brahea decumbens.  

That, or I stand behind my Phoenix acaulis suggestion.  Last time I asked, Phil at jungle music had one of each, which is close to your house.  You could probably plant both in that spot and watering requirements are similar.

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idesign123
19 minutes ago, ahosey01 said:

X1000 for Brahea decumbens. 

I have two decumbens, and love how they add a splash of white to an otherwise green landscape plan (it's the low white plant in my mockups above). Really glad to hear others like it as well, as it doesn't seem to get as much love as it deserves on this forum (at least in recent times). I would put a decumbens in every landscape layout if I could. But I wouldn't consider it a "feature" plant... more like a plant to add to a grouping to give visual variety (aka "a Bismarkia look for people who don't have room for an actual Bismarkia).

I was wondering about the 6' or 7' tall thing too.  If it's a legit limitation due to powerlines or similar then most of the palms I recommended wouldn't work. But if he set that limit out of concern that he would have to maintenance the palm (like the Queen & Washington palms that are constantly dropping crap)... then the palms suggested here would work great. In other words, I'm guessing the criteria is actually "max 6' or 7' if I have to maintenance it... or larger if it's self-cleaning".   But if I'm wrong and it's a firm limit then I do need to retract my earlier recommendations.

Edited by idesign123
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GottmitAlex
6 hours ago, NorCalWill said:

I'm confused when you say you want a palm no more than 6' or 7' tall, but you also considered a Jubaea...

For an all day sunny location, I'd find a big Chamaerops humilis 'Cerifera', or Brahea decumbens, which you won't find very big. Both would close to your height requirement.

Uhm.. You do you realize how long a Jubaea takes to grow. right? Just sayin' 

Case in point: My Alfie in a pot is 6 years into it and is a stump. The one I have planted in the garden is 7 years old and is way smaller than my 4 year old coconut palms which are beside it.

I read Beccariophoenix alfredii are a tick faster growers than Jubaeas (being facetious. sorry) . If that's the case, then the owners can enjoy their feather palm Jubaea chilensis / spectabilis for a longer time before killing or relocating it. 

Personally I would try a couple of bottle palms. (Hyophorbe lagenicaulis)

 

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Christopher Dillman
On 9/8/2021 at 4:25 PM, msporty said:

I have no experience with railroad ties, but I don’t know if leached chemicals are detrimental to palms.

Worth pointing out. One of many reasons I'm having that wall replaced with cinder block concrete. The previous owner back in 97 went on the cheapo and tossed in railroad ties, spackled in white plaster to make it look cinder block (Thought I'd never notice..!).

That said wall is being replaced first, then plantings. However I was told by someone on this board that the palm is stunted and no hope for recovery. I'd like to do what you suggest (water, nutrient the soil..) but sounds like wasted effort based on the stunted diagnosis.

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Christopher Dillman
On 9/8/2021 at 2:04 PM, idesign123 said:

I'm apparently more interested in your yard than my real work today. Three quick mockups...

Lutescens (often called "Areca Palm", though not in Areca family):


lutescensoption.jpg.3c2e83ebfa34a4ac7591d1af11f97ad8.jpg

Chambeyronia macrocarpa ("flamethrower")

flame.jpg.6d8acfb655de7e3da5bb77da5f13699a.jpg

Dypsis leptocheilos ("Teddy Bear"):

teddy.jpg.946d12c173a19e6ac24e4f1ee5a7fda6.jpg

All better than Queen Palms, which I can say with confidence after removing 8 Queens from my yard.

As for the skinny slot by the fence, if that's giant bird of paradise, remove it ASAP. I love them, but that's not enough space for their expanding base. I do have them (and they're a lot of maintenance), but only put those where there's lots of room, and use them where you need major screening).

For the spot by the fence (assuming you want to fill it), I'd personally look into Rhaphis or Bamboo Palm. Here's some Chamadorea costaricana I'm using in a very thin planter which is also quite hot. A couple of the leaves got a bit of brown tips this summer, but seem to be thriving otherwise (and lots of babies growing from the base). 

IMG_9881.thumb.jpeg.138fd25ddf53b72a59c901dec781647f.jpeg

Have fun!

Oh my goodness, thank you! This is such thoughtful work, and evidently you're a better wizard with Photoshop than my current trade skills. Foliage with clipping paths + masks are nutz, I know it. :)

Much to digest here, gosh I love all the directions. Really like the use of color and variety of palms + succulents you got there.

 

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Christopher Dillman
On 9/8/2021 at 6:47 PM, DoomsDave said:

@Christopher Dillman nice to meet you!

Everyone's given you a banquet for thought, and I have a few questions:

1. How rigid is that six or seven foot height requirement?

2. Do you have wires etc., overhead?

3. What's your red-line money wise?

I ask, because that will help put your choices into better perspective. If you have a really rigid height requirement some of the plants suggested will get bigger.

Also, come to the PSSC meeting a week from Saturday. If you can't maybe charter a fun bus and come visit my garden with a few North Countians . . .

In any case, please advise and so nice to meet you.

Thank you @DoomsDave for the warm welcome!

To answer your questions..

1. Height req is not rigid. The only consideration is the size of trunk as it grows, it may or may not have the strength to push out a cinder block wall. For ie I love the Jubaea, but that trunk gets quite plump as it grows. A full queen may be able to handle that space, or go with something more svelte like a dypsis.

2. No wires or any obstruction above.

3. Up to 2500.

A North Countian PSSC meeting? Great to know!

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Christopher Dillman
On 9/8/2021 at 1:03 PM, idesign123 said:

I personally like the idea of clumping dypsis in that spot. If you haven't spent time on the "Palms for California" website yet, you should definitely check it out. The Jungle Music website also has great info on palms for our climate specifically. Here are the two pages on Lutescens (which you can find in most nurseries)...

Any suggestions where I might find a clumping dypsis (like this size and clump) in North County?

dypsis-lanceolata-11750192_0_1_800x1600_38f67.thumb.jpg.e59c9ed9c82ee227ea1e5b95a251a872.jpg

This happens to be a Dypsis lanceolata, which is nice but doesn't have to be this exact. Only for general size goals and clumping trunks reference.

Also this one is evidently bigger than 45 gallon. 

Maybe wishful thinking on my part, but I would love to buy say 2 or 3 of these in 45 gal. I need a visit to Jungle Music this wknd, but any other nurseries you can think of that would carry it in the 30 or 45 gal size?

 

Edited by Christopher Dillman

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ruskinPalms

Clumping Dypsis of some sort is my vote. Just so happens I took a pic of the thinned out D. lutescens at the front of my house today for a different thread. These have been in the ground from barely pinnate seedlings for about 5 to 6 years. Things grow faster than you think! Views from a distance and as walking off my front porch. 
 


 

2EBD8688-7C75-4D02-874E-6F26A980EBC2.jpeg

5226D505-A53B-489C-BECC-112E95EF346C.jpeg

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ruskinPalms

And by the way, D. lutescens fruit like crazy and get messy quick if you don’t keep up with them. I’m guessing the other clumpers like pembana and cabidae fruit heavy too once they get their grove on. 

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idesign123
34 minutes ago, Christopher Dillman said:

Any suggestions where I might find a clumping dypsis (like this size and clump) in North County?

dypsis-lanceolata-11750192_0_1_800x1600_38f67.thumb.jpg.e59c9ed9c82ee227ea1e5b95a251a872.jpg

This happens to be a Dypsis lanceolata, which is nice but doesn't have to be this exact. Only for general size goals and clumping trunks reference.

Also this one is evidently bigger than 45 gallon. 

Maybe wishful thinking on my part, but I would love to buy say 2 or 3 of these in 45 gal. I need a visit to Jungle Music this wknd, but any other nurseries you can think of that would carry it in the 30 or 45 gal size?

 

Rancho Soledad had some relatively large Dypsis lanceolata last time I was there! Things to know about RS is that it's 1) Much more expensive than the other options, and 2) Stock varies a lot from week to week, as they bring plants in (at large sizes) from Hawaii. But if money isn't a big concern I recommend you drop by to see if they might have any palms that fit the bill. They're probably your best bet if looking at big sizes.

Jungle Music has a very large variety of palms, but mostly smaller sizes. And if you don't know what you're looking for it can be really overwhelming... as everything looks very similar when small. Don't get me wrong, I've bought several plants from Phil (aka JM), but mostly small stuff. Best to go there when you have a specific plant in mind. You can also educate yourself on what he sells here - https://www.junglemusic.net/New Plant Arrivals/new_plant_arrivals.html

I've probably bought most of my plants from Josh at Fairview Nursery - https://fairviewnursery.com/plants/palms/ - He's got a really large selection but you need an appointment. Mostly small to medium sized (not 45 gallon), but good quality and selection.

Maybe try Joe @ Discovery Palms too... he has some larger specimens. Here is a link to his Craigslist site, though I'm not sure how up to date it is - https://sandiego.craigslist.org/search/sss?userpostingid=7366500290 (call or text to ask what's in stock as he doesn't list everything).

Only biggie (that I"m aware of) that I haven't personally visited yet is @DoomsDave - He's North of us, but I've heard he has a HUGE assortment of palms. And he's incredibly knowledgeable & helpful. Might be worth a road trip (or you can contact him directly to ask if he has any specific palms).

Here's the sad fact though... The VAST majority of the cool palms are not available at large sizes. I was sorely disappointed to learn this at first, but eventually made peace with it (as evidenced by the dozens of tiny pots of palmy goodness I've acquired). For the large stuff it might be more of a hunt (and not possible for some palms). Maybe check out Rancho Soledad first to see what options they have for "instant gratification" palms from Hawaii Or if up for a (minor) road trip PM Dave to see what he's got in larger sizes.

Or if going with Dypsis lutescens (aka "Areca Palm") you should be able to track down a larger specimen somewhere.  That one is by far the most common of the clumping Dypsis.

* A compromise I settled on was to (over)pay for a few specimen palms from Rancho Soledad (for some instant gratification), then start gathering lots of smaller collectible palms (for future yard awesomeness). That seemed like a great compromise to me.

Hope that helps!

Edited by idesign123
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Dusty CBAD

Something to think about as well: a huge 45g or box specimen palm probably already has a trunk and at a minimum has spent a good chunk of its life in a pot. I would bet almost all of the most beautiful palms you see here on palmtalk were planted from 15g size and smaller. Including that stunning lanceolata. Some palms do fine in a pot and can look beautiful once planted in the ground. Others seem to get “stunted” or just not as robust of a look if they’ve spent too much time in a pot. 
 

If it was my yard, I’d split that $2500. Get a good size 15g of whatever you decide for that spot. At most it will cost you $500, probably less. Now you got $2000 to really get weird with. Start researching and dorking out with it, you’ll be amazed at how many rabbit holes you go down. In 2 years from now that 15g will be bigger and healthier than any boxed specimen. You’ll have a yard full of other palms, in the ground and in pots like the rest of us. 

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DoomsDave
3 hours ago, ruskinPalms said:

And by the way, D. lutescens fruit like crazy and get messy quick if you don’t keep up with them. I’m guessing the other clumpers like pembana and cabidae fruit heavy too once they get their grove on. 

Actually, mostly here the don’t at least not for me. My Dypsis pembanas and Canada’s are about 15 to 20 feet tall now.

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DoomsDave

@Christopher Dillman, @Dusty CBAD has a good idea. Fifteeners are nice and big and will leave you money for more palms if you want. 
 

Save a Jubaea for a BIG place; they’ll get trunks six feet across. 
 

Don’t hurry! Look around a bit.

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ruskinPalms
18 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

Actually, mostly here the don’t at least not for me. My Dypsis pembanas and Canada’s are about 15 to 20 feet tall now.

That’s good to know for the guy that asked for advice. Lutescens here fruit way to much and the fruit grows like grass. They started fruiting from four years after planted out as just barely pinnate palms for me. Fast! And messy! And quite beautiful if you are up for taking care of them. 
 

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Christopher Dillman
2 hours ago, Dusty CBAD said:

..Get a good size 15g of whatever you decide for that spot. At most it will cost you $500, probably less. Now you got $2000 to really get weird with. Start researching and dorking out with it, you’ll be amazed at how many rabbit holes you go down. In 2 years from now that 15g will be bigger and healthier than any boxed specimen. You’ll have a yard full of other palms, in the ground and in pots like the rest of us. 

I'm liking this advice, much appreciated.

How about I meet half-way and get a 30 gal. :D

I think it will depend on what I can find. All these recommendations have been great. Now leaning towards a clumping Dypsis that has good enough heft and size for initial takeoff.

 

 

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Christopher Dillman
3 hours ago, ruskinPalms said:

Clumping Dypsis of some sort is my vote. Just so happens I took a pic of the thinned out D. lutescens at the front of my house today for a different thread. These have been in the ground from barely pinnate seedlings for about 5 to 6 years. Things grow faster than you think! Views from a distance and as walking off my front porch. 
 


 

2EBD8688-7C75-4D02-874E-6F26A980EBC2.jpeg

5226D505-A53B-489C-BECC-112E95EF346C.jpeg

Wow, that's a beaute. And a Bismarck brotha by its side. :)

So thanks to you, I'm now geeking out over the dypsis lutescens, also known areca palm if I'm not mistaken? They can hedge like nutz. Although this pic is from South Florida, have no idea if it would take similarly in SoCal climes. And good to know this size in a 45 gal. 

45-gallon-areca-palm-trees.thumb.jpg.8dcd76a794416af2fc7ae828e05506bc.jpg

 

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ruskinPalms
3 minutes ago, Christopher Dillman said:

Wow, that's a beaute. And a Bismarck brotha by its side. :)

So thanks to you, I'm now geeking out over the dypsis lutescens, also known areca palm if I'm not mistaken? They can hedge like nutz. Although this pic is from South Florida, have no idea if it would take similarly in SoCal climes. And good to know this size in a 45 gal. 

45-gallon-areca-palm-trees.thumb.jpg.8dcd76a794416af2fc7ae828e05506bc.jpg

 

I definitely use them as a hedge too. Versatile palm really. Here is the end of a hedge I planted about the same time as the other I posted in an obviously more favorable part of my yard. Don’t mind the dying coconut palm….. it blocks out my neighbors porch from mine. 

 

DA782CED-BD18-4A9F-BF2F-7CE0B67CACC9.jpeg

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ruskinPalms

By the way, D. lutescens takes sun fine if provided plenty of water, at least here in FL. I’m not sure about out in Cali though. 

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DoomsDave
9 hours ago, ruskinPalms said:

By the way, D. lutescens takes sun fine if provided plenty of water, at least here in FL. I’m not sure about out in Cali though. 

Pretty much the same here, though cold can limit its uses away from the coast.

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Christopher Dillman
On 9/10/2021 at 5:59 PM, idesign123 said:

Rancho Soledad had some relatively large Dypsis lanceolata last time I was there! 

@idesign123 What a great referral, thank you! Just got back from Rancho Soledad. It's truly paradise in RSF. Could spend all day there..

Just got this one in the 15gal. :)

Found another spot for it in my yard, it will be more under a canopy between a big fishtail and jacaranda. Morning sun, partial shade in afternoons. Got the thumbs up from Rancho that would be the ideal spot. 

20210917_093722.thumb.jpg.71537ab9989592caeddfd526d20c7485.jpg

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idesign123
24 minutes ago, Christopher Dillman said:

@idesign123 What a great referral, thank you! Just got back from Rancho Soledad. It's truly paradise in RSF. Could spend all day there..

Yay! That's fantastic news... great place in Southern California for large "instant gratification" palms.  My budget could only afford a few specimen plants from them, but I'm really happy with the ones I bought. Things to keep in mind with RS plants...

1) Price
Much higher than other sources, though sometimes you just want a big plant!

2) Inventory varies from week to week.
Might be worth checking back in a few weeks to see what's new. I see something different each time I go (though admittedly it's been a while, since my collection is pretty large now).  And they don't carry everything (have never seen a Teddy Bear palm there for example).

3) Some of the plants they sell are rootbound.
The one you bought (which is stunning!) looks a little tight in its pot, but happily you're getting in the ground ASAP. Maybe put some "superthrive" on the roots to help wake them up. The other posters were correct about it being better to buy a little smaller and grow yourself, but that one already looks pretty amazing.

4) Some of the plants they sell won't grow here.
I saw a gorgeous "verschaffeltia splendida" there that was a heart-stopper. Happily I didn't buy it since it would have just croaked in my yard. I assume it was there for a conservatory or something.

5) Some plants need acclimating to our climate.
I bought a veichia arecina triple from them that fried pretty bad in the sun (it's now sheltered). A smaller version of the same plant that I bought from Jungle Music is doing much better in the sun. Some plants "sulk" after being taken from Hawaii (I know I would). Lanceolata is pretty tough... but if in doubt try giving it a little more sun each day and watch for burn.

All those caveats said, RS a great resource for larger palms. Though after you've bought a few larger ones from them I also vote that you take your remaining budget and as @Dusty CBAD said to "get weird with it" - collecting lots of healthy smaller specimens. I was disappointed that I couldn't buy large sizes initially, but am already loving watching my smaller palms grow... and you can often find them at super-low prices (by comparison). Have fun building your collection!

Edited by idesign123
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Christopher Dillman
5 hours ago, idesign123 said:

3) Some of the plants they sell are rootbound.
The one you bought (which is stunning!) looks a little tight in its pot, but happily you're getting in the ground ASAP. Maybe put some "superthrive" on the roots to help wake them up. The other posters were correct about it being better to buy a little smaller and grow yourself, but that one already looks pretty amazing.
 

Great information, thank you. I did indeed get smitten with that Lanceolata. Hard not to with everything they have in that acreage.

I swear by the SuperThrive hormone. It's saving the bacon on my Triple King. Do the pin-hole in 5gal bucket treatment, and it was great to know RS does the same technique.

 

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Butch
On 9/11/2021 at 7:19 AM, DoomsDave said:

Pretty much the same here, though cold can limit its uses away from the coast.

If you're still thinking of a D. lutescens for that spot, here is mine in La Mirada, S. OC, N. LA County, about 15 miles away from the ocean... It is pretty large (The wall behind it is 6-1/2'), and it does seed like crazy, at times...

 

On 9/10/2021 at 9:07 PM, DoomsDave said:

Actually, mostly here the don’t at least not for me. My Dypsis pembanas and Canada’s are about 15 to 20 feet tall now.

Dave do your D. lutescens seed?

gxtB9uV.jpg

gTRV2T3.jpg

Butch

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DoomsDave
10 hours ago, Butch said:

If you're still thinking of a D. lutescens for that spot, here is mine in La Mirada, S. OC, N. LA County, about 15 miles away from the ocean... It is pretty large (The wall behind it is 6-1/2'), and it does seed like crazy, at times...

 

Dave do your D. lutescens seed?

gxtB9uV.jpg

gTRV2T3.jpg

Butch

My single specimen does

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dalmatiansoap

What about a nice banana mat? To bad to waste a good spot until something better comes out.

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DoomsDave

Here’s a mature Jube.

It’s big; some are much fatter in the trunk. That’s an actual truck, not a prop. (The Shoe is too hard to see.)

EB5E6161-DEAB-4412-82C0-45F28C420AEE.thumb.jpeg.44d1cf2b7b59398eb1ade70fa35f18a8.jpeg

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Christopher Dillman
1 hour ago, DoomsDave said:

Here’s a mature Jube.

It’s big; some are much fatter in the trunk. That’s an actual truck, not a prop. (The Shoe is too hard to see.)

EB5E6161-DEAB-4412-82C0-45F28C420AEE.thumb.jpeg.44d1cf2b7b59398eb1ade70fa35f18a8.jpeg

Wow, how many years old?

Naive question - is there a way to grow a Jube wider and not taller? That is keep the trunk say 3 to 4 feet high and have those fronds burst outward. I've seen some Jubes this way, but maybe I was looking at younger ones.

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