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my palm tri garden

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tinman10101

Pleasantly surprised this morning when I walking around the front yard. Another butiagrus flowering :D

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tinman10101

with today being overcast, i knew it was a perfect morning to take pics.  a palm that has blown me away as far as survivability in zone 9b is dypsis prestoniana.  unfortunately i planted it way too close to other palms in my jungle and i will never be able to view it in its full glory.  it is just so tucked in there but the way the light casted on the base today really blew me away as far as colors.  below are just some pics of it tucked away.  the fronds are about 8-10 feet long but they are stretched.  

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another palm right next to it is everyone's favorite, hedyscepe canterburyana.  i actually have a couple and it is true that some are rockets and some are just duds.  this one is my rocket and is starting to pick up speed.  i believe it was planted about 8 years ago as a nice 3 gallon.  it puts up about 2-3 leaves a year now.  i know in socal there are huge ones and of course pauleen's is only a 45 min drive away but my temps and hers are drastically different.

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and just to give you an idea of how tucked everything is now unfortunately because of my amateur planting here is a pic i took with everything in perspective :(.  even the huge sabal mauritiiformis leaves are making a cameo.  

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LJG
On 9/5/2021 at 10:11 AM, tinman10101 said:

 

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I love this pic. I have it too. Still remember that day fondly. So much palm talk and laughter. Tri sneakily getting George to eat blood tofu was hilarious. Sad to think the two in the front are no longer with us. I do miss your bro, he was my introduction into true palm obsession that I would soon also have. 

Your garden is going off man. I wish I could make,it up there more often!

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Dypsisdean

Just seeing this for the first time. Thanks for taking the time to post your garden.

It's great to know your brother's obsession with palms was passed along and in good hands. Tri and I talked regularly, and he was one of the "go to" guys when I needed to ask a detailed question about a rare Dypsis, and talk about anything and everything related to finding and growing the "special" stuff. One of those guys you could stand next to, hovering over a newly introduced palm for a half hour, discussing it's characteristics as if nothing else mattered.

He would be very pleased and proud to know you have kept good care of that seed he planted within you. And I'm sure it is hard to enjoy your garden without thinking of him - just as it should be.

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BS Man about Palms
38 minutes ago, LJG said:

I love this pic. I have it too. Still remember that day fondly. So much palm talk and laughter. Tri sneakily getting George to eat blood tofu was hilarious. Sad to think the two in the front are no longer with us. I do miss your bro, he was my introduction into true palm obsession that I would soon also have. 

Your garden is going off man. I wish I could make,it up there more often!

That was the first thing I noticed too Len.. Two great people now gone... and a great day that was to be sure.

But Tin!! What a great paradise you've created! Tri would be so proud! Only because I know the area you are in can appreciate the difficulty it took to achieve what you have!! 
Your place looks so inviting and has some "Velezing" that we all are guilty of, but learn to live with and love...lol

 

Keep it up my friend and hope to see ya again soon!.... at the next tour maybe! 

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Josh-O
On 9/6/2021 at 7:48 AM, tinman10101 said:

so on the tropical side with the jubaea here are some of the key palms i planted.  first is a closeup of the c. humilis vulcano.  i have always loved the compact form and when it was younger it was so compact with no vertical height that it actually reminded me of a young hemithrinax ekmaniana.  here are a few close up shots of it with my dachsie photobomb.  i have a couple of variations of these plants that i have grown over the many years sourced from spain in a field planted population.  i had to grow them up to about 5 years before separating the different mutations and have saved the slow and compact forms.  i am not sure what i will do with the regular forms but probably guerilla plant them on back side of the hoa.  this one is one of the faster one and is about 8 years old.

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such a great looking palm

 

 

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tinman10101
13 hours ago, LJG said:

I love this pic. I have it too. Still remember that day fondly. So much palm talk and laughter. Tri sneakily getting George to eat blood tofu was hilarious. Sad to think the two in the front are no longer with us. I do miss your bro, he was my introduction into true palm obsession that I would soon also have. 

Your garden is going off man. I wish I could make,it up there more often!

yeah that was a great time Len.  i remember george wanted to impress tri that he could eat anything on the vietnamese menu and tri told me in vietnamese that he would get that coagulated pig's blood.  seeing george's face after seeing it and taking a bite when it came out LOL  but he was a trooper and ate it. LOL.  

13 hours ago, Dypsisdean said:

Just seeing this for the first time. Thanks for taking the time to post your garden.

It's great to know your brother's obsession with palms was passed along and in good hands. Tri and I talked regularly, and he was one of the "go to" guys when I needed to ask a detailed question about a rare Dypsis, and talk about anything and everything related to finding and growing the "special" stuff. One of those guys you could stand next to, hovering over a newly introduced palm for a half hour, discussing it's characteristics as if nothing else mattered.

He would be very pleased and proud to know you have kept good care of that seed he planted within you. And I'm sure it is hard to enjoy your garden without thinking of him - just as it should be.

thanks dean for sharing your memory.  tri talked about you and your garden and how you had the nerve to move to HI to grow palms.  LOL he really wanted to go to HI to see your garden too.  its funny because on this day we visited your CA garden as well.  a spectacular day and little did i know i was surrounded by some really good and true friends of tri's that he respected and admired.  i've heard great stories about tri after he passed about his knack for ID palms when they were two leaf seedlings LOL.  He was really a palm nut.  i remember he drove from miami to california to pick up palms only to drive it back another 3,000 miles to grow in his garden.  that was in 1996 unfortunately, i thought he was crazy at the time so i am not even sure what palm it was.  

yes ... everytime i see my jubaea out front it reminds me of him.  (appropriately so for his physical stature and love of palms) he helped me plant it and was so adamant about me planting one since he could not grow one in FL.  i mean gary gave me the jubaea from his garden that he dug up just because i was tri's brother.  now that is some camaraderie.  :greenthumb: he taught me alot about growing palms and how to care for them but ultimately, it was the friendships he had with you all that has ingrained in my  mind about his love of palms and his palm buddies.  

13 hours ago, BS Man about Palms said:

That was the first thing I noticed too Len.. Two great people now gone... and a great day that was to be sure.

But Tin!! What a great paradise you've created! Tri would be so proud! Only because I know the area you are in can appreciate the difficulty it took to achieve what you have!! 
Your place looks so inviting and has some "Velezing" that we all are guilty of, but learn to live with and love...lol

 

Keep it up my friend and hope to see ya again soon!.... at the next tour maybe! 

thanks so much bill.  the garden is starting to look like yours but without all the rarities.  im sure i will see you again because anytime there is a pra, you magically appear. LOL.  well whenever you are in the neighborhood, you are always welcome to see it although i know it doesnt really compare to yours.

 

i am sure tri and george are hovering over a palm and arguing over its ID somewhere now.  :D   

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Tracy
On 9/26/2021 at 9:52 AM, tinman10101 said:

image.png.45bc75596a8fc7fc5ec89df16ab503f1.png

another palm right next to it is everyone's favorite, hedyscepe canterburyana.  i actually have a couple and it is true that some are rockets and some are just duds.  this one is my rocket and is starting to pick up speed.  i believe it was planted about 8 years ago as a nice 3 gallon.  it puts up about 2-3 leaves a year now.  i know in socal there are huge ones and of course pauleen's is only a 45 min drive away but my temps and hers are drastically different.

This really is impressive growing these species where you are!

In one of the earlier comments someone mentioned your use of Aloes and Cycads.  They make great complementary plants to palms in Southern California climates as you show so well.  While the Aloes split off into Aloidendron get massive, those that remained in the Aloe genus tend to remain smaller and lower, which is nice as your palms start going overhead.  The same is true of cycads unless you are talking the few massive ones or are talking about many decades.  

Final comment is that even though you love your current garden, don't be aftaid to take the dive and move if that is what your wife wants.  Keeping a spouse happy is kind of important, at least on my list and the plus is that you get to start over again with the knowledge you have gained from your current garden.  It is a little easier if you live somewhere that things grow fast, but its still achievable here in California.  Great thread with the old shots interspersed with the new of your garden, something others new to the sport can see and learn from!

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tinman10101
19 hours ago, Tracy said:

This really is impressive growing these species where you are!

In one of the earlier comments someone mentioned your use of Aloes and Cycads.  They make great complementary plants to palms in Southern California climates as you show so well.  While the Aloes split off into Aloidendron get massive, those that remained in the Aloe genus tend to remain smaller and lower, which is nice as your palms start going overhead.  The same is true of cycads unless you are talking the few massive ones or are talking about many decades.  

Final comment is that even though you love your current garden, don't be aftaid to take the dive and move if that is what your wife wants.  Keeping a spouse happy is kind of important, at least on my list and the plus is that you get to start over again with the knowledge you have gained from your current garden.  It is a little easier if you live somewhere that things grow fast, but its still achievable here in California.  Great thread with the old shots interspersed with the new of your garden, something others new to the sport can see and learn from!

thanks tracy.  i have followed your garden and of course it is nothing short of spectacular with design as a major component.  

yeah ... happy wife, happy life, right?  i have learned a lot over the years and working on a new blank slate is exciting but the years are catching up to me.  lol.  but i suppose most of my aloes and cycads can be transplanted if i move local.  i only wish i had more real estate just like everyone else.  i even started planted on my back easement HOA property.  hopefully if i move, it will not be in a 9b again.  it has been an uphill battle from day one from the excessive heat, santa anas, snow, below freezing weather, clay .... LOL

cheers

tin

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JubaeaMan138
2 minutes ago, tinman10101 said:

thanks tracy.  i have followed your garden and of course it is nothing short of spectacular with design as a major component.  

yeah ... happy wife, happy life, right?  i have learned a lot over the years and working on a new blank slate is exciting but the years are catching up to me.  lol.  but i suppose most of my aloes and cycads can be transplanted if i move local.  i only wish i had more real estate just like everyone else.  i even started planted on my back easement HOA property.  hopefully if i move, it will not be in a 9b again.  it has been an uphill battle from day one from the excessive heat, santa anas, snow, below freezing weather, clay .... LOL

cheers

tin

Nothing like some African Cycads and African aloes together . 

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Tracy
2 hours ago, tinman10101 said:

i suppose most of my aloes and cycads can be transplanted if i move local. 

It has been done before!  I moved the key Cycads and took pups off most of the Aloes, Agaves and Bromeliads when moving to my current home.  I'm lucky and was able to leave a lot of them because I wasn't selling the previous home.  I was out walking in the neighborhood recently and went down a private cul-de-sac, where a nice palm/cycad garden was located as I had noticed a for sale sign out front when going by a while back.  Where there were once some nice Cycads in the front, there were brown patches or new smaller plantings of more common plants.  All the palms remained as far as I could tell.  It was kind of sad to me, as I appreciated being able to walk by and see that garden.  I never met the owner either.  Hopefully your neighbors appreciate what you have done with your garden as it must really stand out as unique.

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freakypalmguy
On 10/14/2021 at 11:37 AM, tinman10101 said:

yeah that was a great time Len.  i remember george wanted to impress tri that he could eat anything on the vietnamese menu and tri told me in vietnamese that he would get that coagulated pig's blood.  seeing george's face after seeing it and taking a bite when it came out LOL  but he was a trooper and ate it. LOL.  

thanks dean for sharing your memory.  tri talked about you and your garden and how you had the nerve to move to HI to grow palms.  LOL he really wanted to go to HI to see your garden too.  its funny because on this day we visited your CA garden as well.  a spectacular day and little did i know i was surrounded by some really good and true friends of tri's that he respected and admired.  i've heard great stories about tri after he passed about his knack for ID palms when they were two leaf seedlings LOL.  He was really a palm nut.  i remember he drove from miami to california to pick up palms only to drive it back another 3,000 miles to grow in his garden.  that was in 1996 unfortunately, i thought he was crazy at the time so i am not even sure what palm it was.  

yes ... everytime i see my jubaea out front it reminds me of him.  (appropriately so for his physical stature and love of palms) he helped me plant it and was so adamant about me planting one since he could not grow one in FL.  i mean gary gave me the jubaea from his garden that he dug up just because i was tri's brother.  now that is some camaraderie.  :greenthumb: he taught me alot about growing palms and how to care for them but ultimately, it was the friendships he had with you all that has ingrained in my  mind about his love of palms and his palm buddies.  

thanks so much bill.  the garden is starting to look like yours but without all the rarities.  im sure i will see you again because anytime there is a pra, you magically appear. LOL.  well whenever you are in the neighborhood, you are always welcome to see it although i know it doesnt really compare to yours.

 

i am sure tri and george are hovering over a palm and arguing over its ID somewhere now.  :D   

Don’t sell your garden short, it is magnificent and full of rarities, just because one garden can grow different palms than what you can, absolutely does not make it better. There tends to be this belief here with many, that only palms that can’t survive the cold are rare and worthy, “ I can grow what you can’t, therefore my garden is superior” is the attitude I’ve experienced here, it drove me away for years. I had one person visit my garden, then say “now come to my place and I’ll show you a REAL tropical garden” as if mine was inferior in some way. It really bummed me out. I finally said BS, and just enjoy the beautiful and rare species that I can grow, and ignore the grass is greener syndrome.  Sorry for the rant, I just hate to see you talk about your garden as if it doesn’t compare, when in reality it is something very special and unique.

 

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tinman10101
On 10/13/2021 at 10:46 PM, Josh-O said:

such a great looking palm

 

 

thanks josh.  i have one for you still if i ever make it down to see len and the gang.  LOL.  :D

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tinman10101
1 hour ago, freakypalmguy said:

Don’t sell your garden short, it is magnificent and full of rarities, just because one garden can grow different palms than what you can, absolutely does not make it better. There tends to be this belief here with many, that only palms that can’t survive the cold are rare and worthy, “ I can grow what you can’t, therefore my garden is superior” is the attitude I’ve experienced here, it drove me away for years. I had one person visit my garden, then say “now come to my place and I’ll show you a REAL tropical garden” as if mine was inferior in some way. It really bummed me out. I finally said BS, and just enjoy the beautiful and rare species that I can grow, and ignore the grass is greener syndrome.  Sorry for the rant, I just hate to see you talk about your garden as if it doesn’t compare, when in reality it is something very special and unique.

 

hey thanks so much matt!  i can see why you were MIA for so long.  honestly, if someone came over and saw my garden and made a reply such as that, i would just ask them to leave.  at the end of the day, its the achievement of such a garden is relative to its surroundings and the stakes are so much higher when you live in a ruthless climate such as yours and mine.  i definitely take pride in my garden and i can't tell you how many times i am approached by complimentary neighbors while i gardening .... that in itself makes me proud.  

i remember when i first started i would read all your post and salivate at the amazing palms and cycads you were growing knowing you had to fight the extreme heat, santa anas, cold and gophers just like i did.  I cant imagine how amazing your yard is now so thanks for the props.  a true palm enthusiast would admire the impossibility of a plant grown so devoid of its natural environment.  i have always admired a garden for the gardener rather than the plants themselves.  it is a testament to their devotion, resilience, and determination to grow a plant outside of its natural habitat.  at the end of the day, my brother taught me that they are just plants.  its the relationships and camaraderie that form from similar interest that matter most.  thanks buddy for reminding us all that every garden is unique and defining on its own.  :greenthumb:

 

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