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tank

Got a new palmy house with one big bummer

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tank

Moved into a new house that was owned by a plant enthusiast.  Full of various cycads and other interesting plants along with a few nice palms.  One big bummer though.  Large 25’ Butia out in the front yard has ganoderma.

going to get it removed next week, hopefully…

 

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tank

Trying to not let it bum me out completely.  The house and yard are sill awesome.  This is in Gainesville, Fl.

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tank

Big ol mule acquired a long time ago by Merrill Wilcox.  No conchs on this guy…. Thankfully far removed from the infected tree.

 

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tank

Lots of cycads. Gonna need help id'ing some of these.  I get some straight answers from the previous owner but sometimes all I get is "Cuban Zamia", which isn't great but its better than nothing!  Luckily the previous owner is more than happy to discuss what's in his yard so I should be able to get everything Id'ed eventually.

 

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Edited by tank
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tinman10101

amazing property.  congrats  ... we can only dream of lot size like that in california.  what a bonus that the house of previously owned by plant addicts.  i am sure you will do the yard justice going forward.

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Chester B

and to think all I got when I moved in was some Norway maples and Bradford pears....

How fortunate of you to find this place.  Now, how is the house?  Or was it love at first site with the garden!

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tank
42 minutes ago, Chester B said:

and to think all I got when I moved in was some Norway maples and Bradford pears....

How fortunate of you to find this place.  Now, how is the house?  Or was it love at first site with the garden!

We like the house, too.  Comes with two greenhouses with propane heaters.  Previous owner was a big orchid collector.

Going to replace a few of the windows and resurface the pool at some point, but other than that, it’s in good shape.

 

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Edited by tank
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NOT A TA

Nice to buy a home with a mature landscape to work with!

Although there are isolated cases where Ganoderma zonatum APPEARS to infect healthy plants, I've been studying it (Ganoderma cases) for years in this area and in every case I've seen personally there has been another apparent cause of death (decline), after which Ganoderma comes in and does it's normal job. So although it's a shame to lose the one palm I wouldn't be too concerned about others becoming infected with Ganoderma. I'll also suggest there's no reason to get carried away with trying to disinfect the area after the tree is removed due to the Ganoderma. However sanitary removal of the plant parts including sawdust as well as tool cleaning before being used on any other plants should be done to avoid the possibility of spreading any other potential disease to other plants.

I keep threatening to start a thread on Ganoderma zonatum but hesitate because my personal observations are somewhat contrary to published bulletins and what some people believe has occurred on their properties. Because a conk is visible it's often presumed that the Ganoderma is the cause of plant decline and death however there can be other causes which then allow the Ganoderma to develop.

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tank
2 minutes ago, NOT A TA said:

Nice to buy a home with a mature landscape to work with!

Although there are isolated cases where Ganoderma zonatum APPEARS to be infect healthy plants, I've been studying it (Ganoderma cases) for years in this area and in every case I've seen personally there has been another apparent cause of death (decline), after which Ganoderma comes in and does it's normal job. So although it's a shame to lose the one palm I wouldn't be too concerned about others becoming infected with Ganoderma. I'll also suggest there's no reason to get carried away with trying to disinfect the area after the tree is removed due to the Ganoderma. However sanitary removal of the plant parts including sawdust as well as tool cleaning before being used on any other plants should be done to avoid the possibility of spreading any other potential disease to other plants.

I keep threatening to start a thread on Ganoderma zonatum but hesitate because my personal observations are somewhat contrary to published bulletins and what some people believe has occurred on their properties. Because a conk is visible it's often presumed that the Ganoderma is the cause of plant decline and death however there can be other causes which then allow the Ganoderma to develop.

Plant does not appear to be in decline, yet.  I've always been under the understanding that once you see the conchs, regardless of how the plant is doing, you remove the plant immediately.  The local botanical garden had a few trees get ganoderma in the middle of their palmetum.  They removed the trees and then burnt the surrounding root mass and soil using kerosene over a few day period.  Not sure if it worked but the palmetum is still there and the remaining trees are still doing there thing (as far as I know).

There are no palms within 20' of the infected plant.  There is a large Ceratozamia hildae about 10' away.  While I've heard that cycads are susceptible, I've never directly seen or heard of one getting ganoderma.

I always assumed that this fungus was a normal part of our soil flora here in Florida and unlucky and/or compromised trees were the ones to get it.  Obviously, if you've got an infected tree with fruiting bodies emitting spores and the underground mycelium in high concentration, there would be a higher chance for nearby trees to get it.

THAT SAID, I AM DEFINITELY NOT AN EXPERT ON GANODERMA!!

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DoomsDave

@tank gadzooks, you killed with that one!

That's a lot of land, and a forest. Nice house, too. Hope the roof doesn't leak.

I hope you can avoid being too much of an expert on ganoderma. Keep us apprized of what you end up doing and how it works.

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Merlyn

That's a remarkable collection of cycads!  I'd bet that @edbrown_III or @Scott W probably know that location and property!  I saw what I think are Presa Aleman (now officially Aurantiaca), a Lepidozamia Peroffskyana, probably a Rev x Deb hybrid (or maybe Micholitzii), some Zamia Fischeri (or Vasquezii), and I'm guessing a C. Simplicipinna or Apoa next to the door.  Great stuff!!! :D

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donalt

that is quite a nice piece of property and home! very nice collection of cycads. 

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Scott W

@Merlyn appreciate the mention, but unfortunately I don't know anyone in that direct area.  However, being Ed has been dealing with cycads and palms much longer there's a chance he could.

@tank lovely collection you've acquired, the house and pool are nice as well!

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kinzyjr

Love the property @tank!  Nice buy!

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KDubU

Like wow! Very nice property and house, congrats. I am interested to know what some of those are growing as well. Can you post up what they are when you find out?

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awkonradi

Beautiful property!  Maybe just get an alligator for the pool.

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Merlyn
13 hours ago, Scott W said:

@Merlyn appreciate the mention, but unfortunately I don't know anyone in that direct area.  However, being Ed has been dealing with cycads and palms much longer there's a chance he could.

Hah, whups.  I somehow conflated "Jacksonville" and "Gainesville" when I was reading @tank's post.  :D  It's remarkable to see so many not-cold-hardy cycads in that area.  L. Peroffskyana is supposed to burn pretty bad in the mid to upper 20s, though mine had no significant damage last year at 28F and frost.  A little bronzing, but it recovered quickly.

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redant

Good luck with the new jungle. Looks like with a little work it will be amazing. Don't worry to much about the ganoderma, I have had it here and there, while obviously lethal to that palm I haven't seen any major breakouts on my property. 

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Kailua_Krish

Congrats on the new property, its beautiful!

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tank
3 hours ago, redant said:

Good luck with the new jungle. Looks like with a little work it will be amazing. Don't worry to much about the ganoderma, I have had it here and there, while obviously lethal to that palm I haven't seen any major breakouts on my property. 

Thanks!  Ganoderma was always a boogeyman for me and I never got it at the previous house.  The last house was on VERY sandy and well drained soil so I speculate that that helped keeping it from getting established.  I appreciate your input.  Do you treat the soil/stump once the tree has been removed?  I don't think I can safely do the scorched earth technique as it is right up against a very healthy and very large loblolly pine and is in the mix of a bunch of large azaleas.

Also, any info on palms that never really get Ganoderma?  I've never noticed our native palms such as Sabal palmetto, Seranoa repens or Rhapidophyllum hystrix getting it, but that may just be based on my inexperience.  I did have about 20 massive palmettos at the old house.  Never had any problems.

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DCA_Palm_Fan

Beautiful property!   You were left with a very nice mature landscape and plant collection.  Sorry to hear about the gadnoderma.    Any chance you could leave the palm until it declines / dies?   I don't know too much about Gadnoderma I just know that it is either a killer or a harbinger of death for a palm, and that it can be contagious / spread?  

At any rate it looks like you have much else to enjoy there.  congrats! 

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redant
On 8/21/2021 at 1:57 PM, tank said:

Thanks!  Ganoderma was always a boogeyman for me and I never got it at the previous house.  The last house was on VERY sandy and well drained soil so I speculate that that helped keeping it from getting established.  I appreciate your input.  Do you treat the soil/stump once the tree has been removed?  I don't think I can safely do the scorched earth technique as it is right up against a very healthy and very large loblolly pine and is in the mix of a bunch of large azaleas.

Also, any info on palms that never really get Ganoderma?  I've never noticed our native palms such as Sabal palmetto, Seranoa repens or Rhapidophyllum hystrix getting it, but that may just be based on my inexperience.  I did have about 20 massive palmettos at the old house.  Never had any problems.

I have had maybe 12 or so non natives and one native (Royal a native?). Tons of palms around those and never spread to others. I do not do anything to try to rid the area, I can't do the scorched earth thing either. I have planted small palms right in the area where the big palm died, so far with zero issues doing that. Seems it always takes out big palms.  I have only a few sables, they are fine.  I have no rhyme or reason to which palms get it, it's been very varied. The ones that got it where both in sandy and wet areas so no correlation there.  Good luck with the new spread.

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hbernstein

There's a thin-leaflet cycad in a couple of the photos that looks like Ceratozamia norstogii to me, one of my personal favorites.

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Jesse PNW

Awesome place, thanks for sharing!  Love those cycads!

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wimmie

Jason, the broad leaved Cycad with your foot almost at it, is a Stangeria eriopus.

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