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Will

Pinnate palms similar to Chamaerops humilis hardiness

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Will

Hi,

I have been growing some Trachycarpus fortunei and Chamaerops humilis with some protection here in Eastern Austria. I think we are considered usda 7b/8a here. The Chamaerops had some winter damage this year but is coming back strong.

I was wondering if its possible for me to also plant pinnate palms other than Jubaea chilensis. Are there also other pinnate palms which would grow here? At least as hardy as Chamaerops?

I was thinking about some Butias but I haven't tried one yet. Does somebody grow pinnates here in Central Europe?

Cheers,

Will

 

Edited by Will

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Chester B

I think you're down to the following options that may need some protection from time to time, I would say these are all not as hardy as Chamaerops.

Butias - odorata, eriospatha - Some say eriospatha is slightly hardier

Jubaea chilensis

Chamaedorea radicalis

Might be hard to find but a Jubaea x Butia or Butia x Jubaea would be the other options.

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Will

Thanks! What about Butia capitata? How hardy is it compare to the others ones? 

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Chester B
45 minutes ago, Will said:

Thanks! What about Butia capitata? How hardy is it compare to the others ones? 

The real Butia capitata is a pretty rare palm.  What you see commonly sold as Butia capitata is actually Butia odorata. 

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Will

Interesting, didnt know that. Gonna try to find some eriospatha and odorata seeds :lol:

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Henoh

You need some kind of winter protection for Butia or Jubaea. I have had Butia odorata in mine 7b zone in inland Croatia that lasted for seven years with passive protection. Chamadorea radicalis is also good palm to try in good microclimate close to brick, stone or concrete wall and with mulching in winter months. It’s small and easy to protect. 

Edited by Henoh
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Will

Interesting. Must have been huge after 7 years in the ground :w00:

Is Chamadorea fast growing, if it freezes down?

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Henoh

Planted as young palm with base a bit smaller then handball ball and grow up to almost 3 m in 7 years. It’s protected with fleece, heavy mulching and covering over construction with tarpaulin against rain and snow. Palm died after winter 2017. 
Chamadorea radicalis is not fast palm in recovering after freezing. 

86F74419-9268-457E-BC81-005DDA0ED392.jpeg

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Laaz

Try Serenoa repens.

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Flow
2 hours ago, Laaz said:

Try Serenoa repens.

He is looking for feather palms. And anyway, Serenoa don't do well in western Europe. They grow slowly, lose more leaves than they grow and just die off at some point. Perhaps it is different in eastern Austria but I have never heard of any successful attempts.

 

@Will, I second everything Henoh has said.

In my experience, Jubaea is by far the most coldhardy pinnate palm you can grow in our neck of the woods. Butia struggle with the constant winter dampness here. If you are in the drier parts of Austria they might do better.

The hybrids are cool but very hard to find around here. I planted a Butia yatay x Jubaea in Ticino some years ago which does fine but I doubt it would be that easy in my garden.

Chamaedorea radicalis is really easy to protect and trouble-free. Mine lost all its leaves last winter when it saw -9C without protection. It survived and is growing its third new leaf now. It could be faster but we had a very bad spring and summer.

There are also people who grow Phoenix canariensis in Germany and other parts of Europe but this one always needs heavy protection and will outgrow any shelter pretty quickly. Phoenix dactylifera is coldhardy too in theory but we lack the proper summer heat for it to do well. Phoenix theophrastii will just be a huge clump of vicious spines for many years before it looks anything like a palm.

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Axel Amsterdam

My butia eriospatha never had a brown frond and i never protected them in -9c events with daytemps around -4C that sometimes last for a week. I cant tell you how budhardy eriospatha is because i (only) protect the growing point below -6C. I have seen a comparison between jubaea and eriospatha in some serious cold events on a german forum and i think they are very close. The eriospatha is much faster though, so better suited to comeback after loss of fronds.

Edited by Axel Amsterdam
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Will

Thanks for all the replies! I think I gonna stick with a Jubaea for the beginning. They might be easier to get. Have checked for Butia eriospatha but couldn't even find seeds online :mellow:

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Will

I would have another question, Is the hardiness Chamaerops and Jubaea, Palmetto similar?

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Flow
23 hours ago, Will said:

I would have another question, Is the hardiness Chamaerops and Jubaea, Palmetto similar?

Chamaerops show great variation in both form and coldhardiness. But they are comparable to Jubaea. I have no personal exprience with Sabal palmetto. They can be hardy too but they are routinely too slow and demand too much heat for our climate to recover fast enough after damage. Sabal minor has been bulletproof where I live.

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Will

Do you protect your Sabal minor? 

I have some Trachys with light protection, does that mean Sabal minor will not need any?

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Flow
3 hours ago, Will said:

Do you protect your Sabal minor? 

I have some Trachys with light protection, does that mean Sabal minor will not need any?

One is under the canopy of an Arbutus unedo and another one is under a rain cover that I provide for my succulents. The third one is completely unprotected. I have made the experience that they like being on the dry side here in winter (while they prefer ample water in summer).

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