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NatureGirl

New Seed Offer 08/16/21

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NatureGirl

New Seeds available:  +  Shipping by weight/zone
Licuala peltata var. ‘sumawongii’ - .25 each.    
Socratea exorrhiza - .25 each.  $20/100
Hyophorbe indica - .25 each (only 40 available).        
Bentinckia condapanna - .35 each (only 90 available).     
Calyptrocalyx elegans - .35 each (only 125 available).     
Hydriastele longispatha - .20 each $8/50 or $15/100.        
Hydriastele hombronii - .20 each (about 140 available).     
Ptychosperma macarthurii - .15 each $6.50/50 or $12/100.     
Coccothrinax borhidiana - .20 each $18/100
Dypsis madagascariensis ‘mahajanga’ - $5/50 or $8/100

Beachpalms@cfl.rr.com

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ZenMan 1

Good Day Nature Girl

Calyptrocalyx elegans - .35 each x 40 =$14.00

Licuala peltata var. ‘sumawongii’ - .25 each. x25 = $6.25 

Will PayPal 

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NatureGirl

The Bentinckia, Calyptrocalyx and Hyophorbe's are Sold Out. Thx

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NatureGirl

Also Sold Out of Hydriastele hombronii. 

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ZenMan 1

Good Day, Nature Girl   Two special batches has arrived today. Perfect weather for growing more palms. Henri went bye last night.

Happy happy!  Thank you!

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NatureGirl

Only 85 Socratea left now. Still plenty of Hydriastele longispatha left @.20 each or $15/100

Licuala ‘Sumawongii’ ’ sold out now. I can get more if anyone wants some. I think I should tell everyone to crack and remove hard outer shell before planting. See pic below
If there in any interest in Verschafeltii splendida seeds please let me know, I can get these. See pic below
I also have a very late ripening of more Zombia antillarum (about 80) @.20 each

Also, I may get a couple hundred Dypsis psammophila, which are super easy to sprout.

E1CB18BE-6C58-4035-8CD4-3F4E7099FC01.jpeg

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CodyORB
On 8/16/2021 at 2:56 PM, NatureGirl said:

New Seeds available:  +  Shipping by weight/zone
Licuala peltata var. ‘sumawongii’ - .25 each.    
Socratea exorrhiza - .25 each.  $20/100
Hyophorbe indica - .25 each (only 40 available).        
Bentinckia condapanna - .35 each (only 90 available).     
Calyptrocalyx elegans - .35 each (only 125 available).     
Hydriastele longispatha - .20 each $8/50 or $15/100.        
Hydriastele hombronii - .20 each (about 140 available).     
Ptychosperma macarthurii - .15 each $6.50/50 or $12/100.     
Coccothrinax borhidiana - .20 each $18/100
Dypsis madagascariensis ‘mahajanga’ - $5/50 or $8/100

Beachpalms@cfl.rr.com

4CBCF342-F1D8-413C-AF2E-5FE5EF42024A.jpeg

DEDFE985-E68D-4C95-8110-56AD0C05AF77.jpeg

0DAD4F74-314A-46F0-AFF2-809D1ECEFC79.jpeg

80E3A098-D5B0-4C36-942C-4754133F5EF5.jpeg

I'm curious, where did you source the Socratea seeds from?

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