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ngservet

Charleston Medjool Dates

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ngservet

International African American Museum just install these Date Palms on east side of Charleston along the Cooper River.

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PalmatierMeg

They'll look great there.

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DCA_Palm_Fan

Those will look amazing there. I hope they will survive if theres a deep cold snap.   Only other concern with them is that they are being decimated by TPPD in lots of places.  Here in southern FL they are dying off at an alarming rate, and cities and the state have now taken to replacing them all with native Royal Palms.    Its a shame because there are (were) many extremely large, stately old  Phoenix Dactylifera lining many streets here in St. Pete.    Half of the ones on Central Avenue have died in the 4 years I've lived here.  Sad.    At least royals are a viable option here and are just about as large and stately looking.  

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kinzyjr
2 hours ago, DCA_Palm_Fan said:

Those will look amazing there. I hope they will survive if theres a deep cold snap.   Only other concern with them is that they are being decimated by TPPD in lots of places.  Here in southern FL they are dying off at an alarming rate, and cities and the state have now taken to replacing them all with native Royal Palms.    Its a shame because there are (were) many extremely large, stately old  Phoenix Dactylifera lining many streets here in St. Pete.    Half of the ones on Central Avenue have died in the 4 years I've lived here.  Sad.    At least royals are a viable option here and are just about as large and stately looking.  

I definitely miss the days of driving down US-98 through Lakeland and seeing large date palms in the median from Grove Park to downtown.  While the new crownshaft palms are nice in the spots where they're being put, it was good to have something that was hardy to the worst winters and pinnate.  Hope the ones in Charleston do well!

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DCA_Palm_Fan
Just now, kinzyjr said:

I definitely miss the days of driving down US-98 through Lakeland and seeing large date palms in the median from Grove Park to downtown.  While the new crownshaft palms are nice in the spots where they're being put, it was good to have something that was hardy to the worst winters and pinnate.  Hope the ones in Charleston do well!

Yeah I have the same thought.  They  can only use royals maybe as far north as Tampa  but thats about it.  They are bullet proof in Pinellas, especially the southern half.   The ones here will be just fine, but much further north they're going to have to start looking for another alternative pinnate palm that can replace them.  Maybe Jubaea?  I suppose Reclinata can work too, and they do look beautiful when they get old and theres 3-5 tall trunks in a clump.    I sure hope the ones up there make it too and do not suffer from TPPD! 

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kinzyjr
2 minutes ago, DCA_Palm_Fan said:

Yeah I have the same thought.  They  can only use royals maybe as far north as Tampa  but thats about it.  They are bullet proof in Pinellas, especially the southern half.   The ones here will be just fine, but much further north they're going to have to start looking for another alternative pinnate palm that can replace them.  Maybe Jubaea?  I suppose Reclinata can work too, and they do look beautiful when they get old and theres 3-5 tall trunks in a clump.    I sure hope the ones up there make it too and do not suffer from TPPD! 

Probably the best bulletproof alternative is Livistona decora at this point, even though it is not pinnate.  We've got a lot of tall Royals in Polk, but they haven't been used for median plantings yet.  They mostly are used in landscaping in private residences, public parks and buildings, and a few businesses.  Jubaea would be wonderful, but I don't think there are a dozen healthy Jubaea in the ground here in Florida.  There is supposed to be a healthy one in the Sarasota/Bradenton area, if I remember right.

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DCA_Palm_Fan
19 hours ago, kinzyjr said:

Probably the best bulletproof alternative is Livistona decora at this point, even though it is not pinnate.  We've got a lot of tall Royals in Polk, but they haven't been used for median plantings yet.  They mostly are used in landscaping in private residences, public parks and buildings, and a few businesses.  Jubaea would be wonderful, but I don't think there are a dozen healthy Jubaea in the ground here in Florida.  There is supposed to be a healthy one in the Sarasota/Bradenton area, if I remember right.

You may be right unfortunately.    I have not see any Jubaea here at all anywhere.  I wonder why?  do they just not do well in FL?  Id figure they would do great since they are pretty cold tolerant.  Unless of course they are arid / desert palms. 

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Josue Diaz
17 minutes ago, DCA_Palm_Fan said:

You may be right unfortunately.    I have not see any Jubaea here at all anywhere.  I wonder why?  do they just not do well in FL?  Id figure they would do great since they are pretty cold tolerant.  Unless of course they are arid / desert palms. 

They certainly don't do well in humid environments. I think that even the massive, 100-year-old specimen transplanted to the aquarium in Dallas has been declining since being moved there from CA. 

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DCA_Palm_Fan
1 hour ago, Josue Diaz said:

They certainly don't do well in humid environments. I think that even the massive, 100-year-old specimen transplanted to the aquarium in Dallas has been declining since being moved there from CA. 

I've watched that one for a long time.  Is it declining from humidity? Or from COLD?   I mean did it even live through the Texas palmageddon last winter? 

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Josue Diaz
5 minutes ago, DCA_Palm_Fan said:

I've watched that one for a long time.  Is it declining from humidity? Or from COLD?   I mean did it even live through the Texas palmageddon last winter? 

Perhaps both? Suffers in winter, can't recover properly in summer?

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DCA_Palm_Fan
1 minute ago, Josue Diaz said:

Perhaps both? Suffers in winter, can't recover properly in summer?

Probably very likely id imagine.   I wonder if its even still there. 

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DreaminAboutPalms

The Jubaea in Dallas did not survive Palmagaeddon this year unfortunately. It was never healthy there and was putting out stunted fronds. 

Jubaeas don't like a lot of heat/humidity,  that thing always looked better in winter 

Edited by DreaminAboutPalms

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DreaminAboutPalms

I'm not sure the Dallas Jubaea ever had a real chance.

In 2010 it was ripped out of the ground, transported 1700+ miles on a flatbed. Winter of 2011 was coldest since 1989 and then summer of 2011 had 70 days over 100 and a major drought. 

Last few winters before this year were very mild, 

Here are the pics in 2010 vs Feb 2020

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image.thumb.png.6707501e73c97aeca4dadf64501365c9.png

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UK_Palms
53 minutes ago, Josue Diaz said:

They certainly don't do well in humid environments.

We're pretty humid over here though, especially in winter, yet Jubaea seems to grow okay still. We may not get extreme winter lows like some places, but we do get quite a bit of prolonged wet-cold from November - March and quite a bit of rain. The rest of the year in general is relatively humid as well, so if humidity alone is the issue, shouldn't the Jubaea's be suffering here as well? It must be the hot summer nights in continental/tropical climates, combined with the high humidity and rainfall that is the issue.

Maybe they handle wet-cold winters better than they handle hot-wet summers? In their native range they are used to sunny 80F days and clear, cool 60F nights during the height of summer. 95F days and 80F nights are too hot and probably going to be an issue, combined with rainfall and high humidity. It may promote fungal growth in this species. Hence why Jubaea's handle the dry heat in California and the Mediterranean, but not wet-heat in Florida and Queensland. I'm not 100% on that though. I just know we have Jubaea growing here, despite the humidity.

Here are a few from London...

328694316_Screenshot2021-08-11at21_17_32.thumb.png.016513a793b87eb486ce0cc3f82ea49a.png

24642554_Screenshot2021-08-11at19_36_56.thumb.png.4eb3579e76ec6bde7596141a28050cdb.png

 

This one is in Richmond, southwest London...

212eb75b001dce5e4eab715d3552b8c0.thumb.jpg.cc5359724d2bd78579865dd1931a8ccc.jpg

thumbnail_image0-53.jpg.73f4d7cb97d65b8609f32860a98a4683.jpg

 

There's a big one up near Birmingham as well, which is pretty far north. About 100 miles further north than London and further inland from coast. It's hidden away in a back yard.

1649798774_Screenshot2021-08-11at21_33_51.thumb.png.78f1cfd68ba441cb5a75700cf2a1eaab.png

It has been there at least a decade now and it has to be about 30 foot tall. It has been flowering as well in recent years.

50232308247_a215f07ea1_b.jpg.9100c715f486c0b35dcda14d6fff623d.jpg

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52 minutes ago, Josue Diaz said:

I think that even the massive, 100-year-old specimen transplanted to the aquarium in Dallas has been declining since being moved there from CA. 

The Dallas Jubaea is totally kaput I think. It's just a stump now. That palm probably dated back to the 1890's as well. I think it was @Collectorpalms who posted this a few months back. I wonder if it stands a chance at pushing any new growth? With a trunk that size there is bound to be some live tissue in there pushing up, surely? Assuming it didn't just fizzle out this summer. Is it still there now, or have they removed it? The February freeze aside, summer nights are probably too warm in Dallas with the combined heat and humidity causing those issues it had.

80D255B2-726A-4DB3-8AF0-BD24B3FE8B2E.thumb.jpeg.a10127d27fd6f3d428559f9b265f070f.jpg.4823ac205424c0a5581195a3e8314843.jpg

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Laaz

Those Charleston dates look like they are down near the CPW building.

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ngservet
On 8/12/2021 at 7:29 AM, Laaz said:

Those Charleston dates look like they are down near the CPW building.

They are right next to the aquarium in front of the new African American Museum currently being built.

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Hutch

The Dallas... Jubaea....i think never got use to its new environment enough it takes time with these ...ive been felt the death card a few times here in Oregon..

16296818510814218350115392401365.jpg

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Hutch

Anyways ...those Date palms ate gonna looks great a year from now ...Keep us all posted!

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DCA_Palm_Fan
On 8/11/2021 at 7:06 PM, UK_Palms said:

We're pretty humid over here though, especially in winter, yet Jubaea seems to grow okay still. We may not get extreme winter lows like some places, but we do get quite a bit of prolonged wet-cold from November - March and quite a bit of rain. The rest of the year in general is relatively humid as well, so if humidity alone is the issue, shouldn't the Jubaea's be suffering here as well? It must be the hot summer nights in continental/tropical climates, combined with the high humidity and rainfall that is the issue.

Maybe they handle wet-cold winters better than they handle hot-wet summers? In their native range they are used to sunny 80F days and clear, cool 60F nights during the height of summer. 95F days and 80F nights are too hot and probably going to be an issue, combined with rainfall and high humidity. It may promote fungal growth in this species. Hence why Jubaea's handle the dry heat in California and the Mediterranean, but not wet-heat in Florida and Queensland. I'm not 100% on that though. I just know we have Jubaea growing here, despite the humidity.

Here are a few from London...

328694316_Screenshot2021-08-11at21_17_32.thumb.png.016513a793b87eb486ce0cc3f82ea49a.png

24642554_Screenshot2021-08-11at19_36_56.thumb.png.4eb3579e76ec6bde7596141a28050cdb.png

 

This one is in Richmond, southwest London...

212eb75b001dce5e4eab715d3552b8c0.thumb.jpg.cc5359724d2bd78579865dd1931a8ccc.jpg

thumbnail_image0-53.jpg.73f4d7cb97d65b8609f32860a98a4683.jpg

 

There's a big one up near Birmingham as well, which is pretty far north. About 100 miles further north than London and further inland from coast. It's hidden away in a back yard.

1649798774_Screenshot2021-08-11at21_33_51.thumb.png.78f1cfd68ba441cb5a75700cf2a1eaab.png

It has been there at least a decade now and it has to be about 30 foot tall. It has been flowering as well in recent years.

50232308247_a215f07ea1_b.jpg.9100c715f486c0b35dcda14d6fff623d.jpg

50232309277_680884c451_b.jpg.e104ee1ec4669ec7ccbb94fabfa231ac.jpg

 

 

The Dallas Jubaea is totally kaput I think. It's just a stump now. That palm probably dated back to the 1890's as well. I think it was @Collectorpalms who posted this a few months back. I wonder if it stands a chance at pushing any new growth? With a trunk that size there is bound to be some live tissue in there pushing up, surely? Assuming it didn't just fizzle out this summer. Is it still there now, or have they removed it? The February freeze aside, summer nights are probably too warm in Dallas with the combined heat and humidity causing those issues it had.

80D255B2-726A-4DB3-8AF0-BD24B3FE8B2E.thumb.jpeg.a10127d27fd6f3d428559f9b265f070f.jpg.4823ac205424c0a5581195a3e8314843.jpg

Sad.   Still kinda pisses me off that they would sell it and take it from a place where it was thriving, and put in a place where it had a marginal chance at survival.   I could understand if it was a small palm but this thing was giant and very old.   Just terrible.  

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