Jump to content
Maltese coconut project

Growing Cocos nucifera (Coconut) in marginal climates outside the tropical monsoon, in subtropical, Mediterranean type climate, methods used

Recommended Posts

Maltese coconut project

I think it's very similar to Malta. Some might succeed if they aren't too small and young 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr. Coconut Palm
On 11/11/2021 at 1:09 AM, Maltese coconut project said:

Which area do you live in? (just to have an idea of your climate) 

Hi,

I live in Flour Bluff on the east side of Corpus Christi, Texas, near the Laguna Madre (about 6/10 of a mile east of me), and about 5 miles inland from the Gulf of Mexico.  The latitude here is 27.65 N Latitude.

John

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr. Coconut Palm
On 11/11/2021 at 1:09 AM, Maltese coconut project said:

Which area do you live in? (just to have an idea of your climate) 

I think the average high/low here at my place in January is 65F/50F.  We normally get down into the 30'sF here about 3 to 5 times each winter, with the normal coldest morning at my place about 33F, and I can go without a freeze usually for 3 or 4 years at a time.   But here, we start warming up significantly in late February and early March.  We have very warm springs and falls here, and hot summers.  Our annual average rainfall, where I live is right at 30 inches per year, but the Corpus Christi Airport, which is about 20 miles inland from me, averages 31.76 inches per year.  I hope this info helps you.  By the way, I estimate the normal high/low in July here where I live to be 94F/78F.

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr. Coconut Palm
On 11/11/2021 at 1:09 AM, Maltese coconut project said:

Which area do you live in? (just to have an idea of your climate) 

Oh, and we have high humidity here in the spring and most of the fall, and very high humidity here in the summer, which I think really helps the growth of Coconut Palms here.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GottmitAlex
On 11/11/2021 at 5:49 PM, Alicante said:

All of the monthly averages are in the World Meteorological Organization / WMO website.

This is the link: https://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=2904

There you have all highs/lows during each month. 

 

On 11/11/2021 at 9:31 AM, Alicante said:

@GottmitAlex @Mr. Coconut Palm @Maltese coconut project What do you think about the growing possibilities in this city within the province of Almería?
I just found this official WMO data about this city, didn't know about it before, turns out it's the 2nd biggest city in the province of Almería. 
It's naturally protected as well as it gets constant heat currents from Africa. These are the averages: 

https://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=2904

- Only 3 months have average highs under 21ºC / 70F
- The coldest month is January with an average high of 17.5ºC / 63.5F 
- The annual average is 19.87ºC / 67.8F and the summers are hot with very warm nights. 

Do you think coconuts hold any chance in this climate? Delonix Regia / Royal Poincianas grow in Roquetas de Mar if that's an indicator. 
 

I think there is a chance.  

If the numbers are correct for "Roquetas de Mar" , I believe there may be a chance for cocos nucifera.

 

 

Screenshot_20211112-210435.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

I understand. Living in an area in a very close proximity to a sea makes a big difference due to the fact that the night time low won't drop as low as in inner continent. It's similar in Malta 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

In Degrees Fahrenheit, from what I have noticed (if all the data presented here is near correct) you have a better winter than Malta in Flour Bluff Corpus Christi Texas 

Screenshot_2021-11-13-11-09-46-740_com.android.chrome.jpg

Screenshot_2021-11-13-11-09-28-159_com.android.chrome.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

In the case of Malta, the winter temperatures are quite near correct in the picture (though usually slightly warmer than pictured) but our summer is hotter then those pictures I just presented say, sometimes it starts getting hot after the first 10-20 days of May.  But in coconut palms and other full tropical plants,  too high summers above 100 degrees Fahrenheit daytime temperatures with fairly low winters in the isn't as good as a more balanced summer vs winter, you have better balanced climate there with most of the winter still in the 70s daytime temperatures  although nighttime lows also count. Tropical trees simply have a narrower temperature range where they do best, but at their best temperatures they grow faster than plants adapted for temperate or polar regions 

Edited by Maltese coconut project

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

Moving the oldest ones to the east side to shelter from the upcoming gale storm from the west 

IMG_20211126_111644.jpg

IMG_20211126_111652.jpg

IMG_20211126_111716.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

So December starts to be significantly a bad month in terms of temperature for coconut palms. By just one month from my last photos, they look significantly battered especially the ones in the front row farthest from the corner.  During our December, daytime high goes below 21 degrees celcius (70 degrees Fahrenheit) and night time low below 15 degrees celcius (below 60 degrees Fahrenheit). January, February and March are also among the bad months with April being borderline (similar to November) and May to October being the best. Also I noticed that the dehusked ones germinated by myself and more cool tolerant than the ready ones purchased from Lidl. 

IMG_20211228_152306.jpg

IMG_20211228_152246.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

From my experience with Indian,  Nicaraguan, South East Asian and Dutch greenhouse coconut varieties (I didn't have access to other varieties by nation yet) Indian coconut palms seem to be the most cool tolerant for a Mediterranean winter climate. These 4 are Indian varieties 

IMG_20220112_121056~2.jpg

IMG_20220112_121115~2.jpg

IMG_20220112_121125~2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

Nicaraguan ones (biggest three). Their colour doesn't look as beautiful as the Indian ones but they survived winter 2020 - 2021 in the same area 

IMG_20220112_121020~2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

South East Asian ones

IMG_20220112_121130~2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

And the last ones which probably are already dead, Dutch greenhouse ones

IMG_20220112_121028~3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

Our current weather (Top celcius, bottom Fahrenheit

Screenshot_2022-01-12-12-57-20-542_com.android.chrome.jpg

Screenshot_2022-01-12-12-57-28-750_com.android.chrome.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

Update of the few Coconut varieties by country that I have. The Indian ones persist to be the most cool resistant and still in nice condition 

IMG_20220123_130659.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

Nicaraguan Green variety, quite good looking 

IMG_20220123_130721~2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

Nicaraguan orange type, not too good looking but rather battered 

IMG_20220123_130710~2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

Indian varieties, the best looking so far 

IMG_20220123_130745~2.jpg

IMG_20220123_130756~2.jpg

IMG_20220123_130817~2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

Not sure about the origin of these two.  They could be from South East Asia or from Ivory Coast but the supermarket staff selling it weren't sure 

IMG_20220123_130825~2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

And one particular Indian specimen with yellowish and dwarfish characteristics 

IMG_20220123_130833~2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

Our current climate, celcius top, Fahrenheit bottom 

Screenshot_2022-01-23-14-07-35-990_com.android.chrome.jpg

Screenshot_2022-01-23-14-07-28-372_com.android.chrome.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr. Coconut Palm
On 8/1/2021 at 8:49 PM, 3 Milesfrom Gulf of Mexico said:

I'm here is Florida north of Tropic of Cancer.  This coconut is 16 years old.  Coldest temperature last winter 37 degrees Fahrenheit .

0432E02A-2358-4CD8-B7E2-CEDC215297B0_1_105_c.jpeg

BFDE7636-E91A-401D-B4C9-E5D58F8EF349_1_105_c.jpeg

Nice looking Central Florida Coconut Palm.  Do you know what variety it is, and are the nuts viable?

John

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr. Coconut Palm
On 8/2/2021 at 6:46 AM, 3 Milesfrom Gulf of Mexico said:

Seminole, Florida  is located at 27°50′19″N 82°47′6″W (27.838502, -82.784913).  It is surrounded by Pinellas County enclaves in all directions. Its closest neighbors are Indian Rocks Beach to the northwest, Largo to the north, Pinellas Park to the east, St. Petersburg to the south, and Madeira Beach to the west.

Seminole has a humid subtropical climate.  We are  far enough south that it lies in the broad transition zone from subtropical to tropical climates. As such, Seminole is mostly warm to hot year round, with few nights of frost. Most of the annual rainfall comes in the wet season (June through September), when daily thundershowers erupt due to the strong solar heating. The dry season starts in October and runs through May, at which time the weather is sunny, dry, and there is little change in daily weather.  Historical average for rainfall in August is 8 inches.  

Last winter we had no frost.  If we do get nights in the low 40's or high 30's it only last a few hours.  As soon as the sun rises in the morning the temperature usually rebound quickly.  I used to wrap the tree when it was a juvenile during cold nights.  Not anymore.  I haven't done a thing since we have had mild winters last few seasons.  

Last month we had Hurricane Elsa.  We had 50-60 MPH winds.  Coconut had no wind damage except for a few coconuts falling to the ground.  

I bought the  sprouted coconut tree from a small road side produce stand in Maui for $5.00.  I got it inspected at the airport and was able to put it in my carry on luggage.  I never potted it and stuck it in the ground the next day when I arrived home  in Florida.  After 16 years it is still going strong.  

Good luck with your coconut project.  

If you got it in Hawaii, judging by the color of the petioles, it might be a Green Hawaiian Tall, which is one of the more cold hardy/cool weather hardy varieties, slightly more cold/cool weather hardy than the Golden Hawaiian Tall.

John

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr. Coconut Palm
On 8/13/2021 at 12:21 PM, Aleitalyyy said:

@GottmitAlex 

hi alex I have followed many many posts here on the forum ... the idea was born from all the posts with coconut on the edge ... corona, new port beach, then those in the desert etc etc are all yellow ... I was convinced then that the yellows were more tolerant of the winter cold ... it will be just coincidences then ..

It has been my experience with several trials, that with the exception of the Golden Orange Colored Petioles of the the Panama Tall, that the Golden and Yellow varieties ARE LESS COLD/COOL WEATHER HARDY than the Green Varieties.  Here on the South Texas Coast, you can ONLY grow Golden Malayan Dwarfs and Yellow Malayan Dwarfs in the Lower part of the Rio Grande Valley around San Benito, Olmito, Brownsville, Los Fresnos, Bayview, Port Isabel, and South Padre Island in Cameron County, whereas the green varieties, including the Green Malayan Dwarf can be grown as far inland as Mcallen, and as far north in the Valley as Harlingen, and we can succesfully get the Green Malayan Dwarfs to grow here on the east side of Corpus Christi,  along the east side of Ocean Dr. (bayfront), in Flour Bluff (small peninsula right before you get to the island), and on Padre Island.  We are even able to get Green Malayans to produce woody trunk here and produce a few nuts between really bad coconut killing winters, but we CANNOT get the Golden Malayans and Yellow Malayans to grow here for any length of time at all.

John

Edited by Mr. Coconut Palm
More info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

Wow and it's bearing fruit 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr. Coconut Palm
14 minutes ago, Maltese coconut project said:

Wow and it's bearing fruit 

Are you responding to me?

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maltese coconut project

Yes regarding the Florida coconut, very beautiful 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...