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Growing Cocos nucifera (Coconut) in marginal climates outside the tropical monsoon, in subtropical, Mediterranean type climate, methods used

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GottmitAlex
43 minutes ago, Maltese coconut project said:

I still find some articles a bit confusing when it comes to adding salt.  According to this particular article they don't recommend watering with above 0.6% salinity, or 6 parts per thousand. Sometimes I still doubt this number but then on second thought, I also know that they are monsoon plants and I still fear taking the risk. To be honest I wish to experiment trying a few near a local beach, but our low precipitation discourages me. To solve the problem I need to find an all year round watercourse https://www.ehow.com/facts_7623427_can-coconut-trees-sea-water.html

Yes, don't test coconuts in near your beaches.  They will die there.  

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November and temperatures are in their lower 70s Fahrenheit / lower 20s degrees celcius in the shade but mid 80s Fahrenheit /upper 20s or 30 degrees celcius in the sun 

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Alicante

Hello everyone and thanks to @Maltese coconut project for doing this thread. Well, I have great news. There is actually someone growing a coconut in Málaga (Rincón de la Victoria) that's already 10 years old, that person is growing it outdoors without any kind of protection since 2013 so that's 8 years already!!! It's just placed on a 2nd floor terrace with a wall behind to protect it from northerlies. Since the credit is not mine, I'll just put the link here. https://foro.infojardin.com/threads/cocotero-en-malaga.114833/

It's a Spanish Gardening Forum but I guess with Google Translate the content can be readable. The pics are still there, at least as of 2020 the coconut was already 2.8m tall (9.2 FT)

Rincón de la Victoria is placed at 36º 42'N !  So at the moment, if i'm not wrong, these are the northernmost coconuts growing without protection. 

This coconut never had any kind or protection since it was placed outdoors in 2013, not even a simple plastic net to protect it since it was first an experiment as well but it seems it has gone well instead of going wrong. There was actually another coconut that died in 2019 or 2020 (I'm not exactly sure) but this one survived and it's thriving and growing up as well.

That place of Spain has average highs above 17ºC (63F) in all winter months so if there's a good spot to try one in Spain, that's the good one. I have heard there was one in the past in Almuñécar that thrived for many years but it ended up dying.  Here is the 2016 thread where there were actually 2 coconuts, now it's just one left, but hey, 8 years in EUROPE without protection is not a small deal! :lol: https://foro.infojardin.com/threads/he-germinado-un-coco-y-ahora-que-hago-con-el.61372/#post-1005156

You can see here all of the recent pics as well as the size of the 2 "coconut brothers" back to 2013 before they went outdoors. Sadly one of them passed away as I told before. 
https://foro.infojardin.com/threads/cocotero-en-malaga.114833/ here were the 2016 pics that were showing both of them 
https://foro.infojardin.com/threads/he-germinado-un-coco-y-ahora-que-hago-con-el.61372/#post-1005156 take account that the 2020 pics were done in April, after a prolonged cold spell. But it wasn't looking too bad though! 
 

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Maltese coconut project

So far one of the closest climates to Malta according to online statistics (Malta is actually warmer than shown in the statistics but I don't know whether this thing applies to other countries as well) 

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MelvinB

Looks nice! It has almost the same size container like my Cocos is growing in.

0077BBA1-5A5C-49CF-A6A2-1B7B12D7F420.jpeg

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Maltese coconut project

I used 42 litre pot 

Edited by Maltese coconut project

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Alicante
39 minutes ago, Maltese coconut project said:

So far one of the closest climates to Malta according to online statistics (Malta is actually warmer than shown in the statistics but I don't know whether this thing applies to other countries as well) 

Yep, applies at least in Spain as well. In fact, the official AEMET averages map shows 2 coastal zones in southern Spain with annual averages above 20ºC (68F) which is mind blowing for 36-37ºN latitudes. One is in Granada, near Motril and another one is in the province of Almería. Rincón de la Victoria, Málaga is also warmer than Málaga city, well in fact Málaga's official weather station comes from the airport that is slightly cooler than the coastal parts of the city, or Marbella or Rincón and so on.  The southern coast of Spain is completely protected by northern winds thus giving it such a warm climate. The official WMO offers some climate charts for that zone of Spain, i'll put the links below. 

Motril 1981-2010 averages: https://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=2189
Torremolinos averages: https://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=2909
Estepona averages: https://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=2894

The warmest areas of Spain have 17-18ºC highs and 9-10ºC lows (63-64F / 48-50F) during the coldest month (January) just as shown above. 

The amount of tropical fruits and palms growing in that area is insane. Also the biggest Royals, Kings and Kentias within Europe are in that area. I've posted lots of pics many years ago here in PalmTalk but all were hosted by TinyPic and that site went down as well as it didn't even gave me the option to recover the hundreds of photos I had uploaded. :(

Just as guidance, that area grows this extended list of ultra tropical fruits, all of them being grown up outdoors, of course.  I've also had an extended list of tropical and ultra tropical palms growing in that region, I think I've posted it as well several years ago here in PalmTalk. I got them from several gardening pages, I could try to find them if anyone wants to. 

- Koubo fruit
- Salak - Snake fruit 
- Mangosteen
- Rambutan
- Guava
- Carambola - Star Fruit
- Pitaya - Dragon Fruit
- Sapote
- Jujube
- Longan
- Litchi
- Pitanga
- Passionfruit - Maracuya
- Cherimoya - Custard Apple

That zone also produces thousands of tons of all kinds of mangoes and avocados. Although mangoes and avocados also grow in my area as well, they're not ultra tropicals. 

Sources: https://www.campodebenamayor.es/frutas-tropicales/#1539801027729-81719242-f05b  
https://matadornetwork.com/es/frutas-tropicales-malaga/ 
https://www.diariosur.es/malagaenlamesa/frutas-extranas-pueden-20181108211551-nt.html

Edited by Alicante
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Maltese coconut project

Very interesting data, thanks for the information 

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MelvinB
38 minutes ago, Maltese coconut project said:

I used 42 litre pot 

Mine is 75 litre. 
But i was referring to @Alicante his post but forgot to quote haha.

Edited by MelvinB

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Maltese coconut project

I understand 

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GottmitAlex

Anyone leaving a Coco outdoors for this coming winter? 

As a test. For posterity.

 

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Maltese coconut project

I am doing so much again this winter as I did last winter 

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Mr. Coconut Palm
9 hours ago, Alicante said:

Hello everyone and thanks to @Maltese coconut project for doing this thread. Well, I have great news. There is actually someone growing a coconut in Málaga (Rincón de la Victoria) that's already 10 years old, that person is growing it outdoors without any kind of protection since 2013 so that's 8 years already!!! It's just placed on a 2nd floor terrace with a wall behind to protect it from northerlies. Since the credit is not mine, I'll just put the link here. https://foro.infojardin.com/threads/cocotero-en-malaga.114833/

It's a Spanish Gardening Forum but I guess with Google Translate the content can be readable. The pics are still there, at least as of 2020 the coconut was already 2.8m tall (9.2 FT)

Rincón de la Victoria is placed at 36º 42'N !  So at the moment, if i'm not wrong, these are the northernmost coconuts growing without protection. 

This coconut never had any kind or protection since it was placed outdoors in 2013, not even a simple plastic net to protect it since it was first an experiment as well but it seems it has gone well instead of going wrong. There was actually another coconut that died in 2019 or 2020 (I'm not exactly sure) but this one survived and it's thriving and growing up as well.

That place of Spain has average highs above 17ºC (63F) in all winter months so if there's a good spot to try one in Spain, that's the good one. I have heard there was one in the past in Almuñécar that thrived for many years but it ended up dying.  Here is the 2016 thread where there were actually 2 coconuts, now it's just one left, but hey, 8 years in EUROPE without protection is not a small deal! :lol: https://foro.infojardin.com/threads/he-germinado-un-coco-y-ahora-que-hago-con-el.61372/#post-1005156

You can see here all of the recent pics as well as the size of the 2 "coconut brothers" back to 2013 before they went outdoors. Sadly one of them passed away as I told before. 
https://foro.infojardin.com/threads/cocotero-en-malaga.114833/ here were the 2016 pics that were showing both of them 
https://foro.infojardin.com/threads/he-germinado-un-coco-y-ahora-que-hago-con-el.61372/#post-1005156 take account that the 2020 pics were done in April, after a prolonged cold spell. But it wasn't looking too bad though! 
 

But it doesn't really count if it is NOT planted IN the ground!  The whole concept of growing them in marginal climates outside their normal range, IS to successfully grow them IN the ground with little or no protection most winters, but NOT just grow them in pots!

John

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Maltese coconut project

It counts because pot or ground they are still being exposed to the outside weather and if that weather is optimal or at some point gets them in a few months at risk, that is important data to everyone here trying to learn more about this species tolerances 

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Mr. Coconut Palm
6 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Anyone leaving a Coco outdoors for this coming winter? 

As a test. For posterity.

 

Hey Alex,

I leave mine that are in pots out all winter, even on frosty nights with low temps around 33F to 36F, at least a couple of times to help harden them off.  This applies to all of mine, even the little ones only a foot and a half tall.  The only ones I would protect at such temps are sprouts only an inch to a few inches tall, but even these, I will try to expose to at least one or two nights down to around 38F.  The only time I will bring in the others is if temps are predicted to get down below 33F or 34F (technically I protect them by bringing them in if temps are predicted to get below 34F, but occasionally the temps will dip a degree or two below what is predicted when they are left out, thus exposing them to a very light freeze, which usually doesn't significantly hurt them).   The only other conditions I will bring them in for is for extended periods (6 days or more of highs in the 40'sF and 50'sF and lows in the 30'sF with drizzle, which seems to happen here about once every 3 or 4 winters.  Other than that, all my potted Coconut Palms stay out all winter here at my place, and I estimate my normal high/low in January to be 65F/50F, so if that give you any ideas what I am dealing with.

John

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Mr. Coconut Palm
4 minutes ago, Maltese coconut project said:

It counts because pot or ground they are still being exposed to the outside weather and if that weather is optimal or at some point gets them in a few months at risk, that is important data to everyone here trying to learn more about this species tolerances 

I suppose so, but in the case of a second story terrace/patio in close proximity to the patio wall, and door, it would get more heat, as warm air rises on cold nights, and it would get radiational heat coming off the house on cold winter nights.

John

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Alicante
3 hours ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

But it doesn't really count if it is NOT planted IN the ground!  The whole concept of growing them in marginal climates outside their normal range, IS to successfully grow them IN the ground with little or no protection most winters, but NOT just grow them in pots!

John

Of course it does count as long as no one protects them mate, they are fully exposed to all weather events without any kind of protection.

The owner actually said it's hard for her to move the container as it's a 100 liter container (the plan is to put it on ground if it reaches 10 years thriving) and the height where is placed is actually a first floor, I said second counting the ground floor as the first floor, but actually it would be in what is the first floor. 

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Stelios
14 hours ago, Alicante said:

Yep, applies at least in Spain as well. In fact, the official AEMET averages map shows 2 coastal zones in southern Spain with annual averages above 20ºC (68F) which is mind blowing for 36-37ºN latitudes. One is in Granada, near Motril and another one is in the province of Almería. Rincón de la Victoria, Málaga is also warmer than Málaga city, well in fact Málaga's official weather station comes from the airport that is slightly cooler than the coastal parts of the city, or Marbella or Rincón and so on.  The southern coast of Spain is completely protected by northern winds thus giving it such a warm climate. The official WMO offers some climate charts for that zone of Spain, i'll put the links below. 

Motril 1981-2010 averages: https://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=2189
Torremolinos averages: https://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=2909
Estepona averages: https://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=2894

The warmest areas of Spain have 17-18ºC highs and 9-10ºC lows (63-64F / 48-50F) during the coldest month (January) just as shown above. 

The amount of tropical fruits and palms growing in that area is insane. Also the biggest Royals, Kings and Kentias within Europe are in that area. I've posted lots of pics many years ago here in PalmTalk but all were hosted by TinyPic and that site went down as well as it didn't even gave me the option to recover the hundreds of photos I had uploaded. :(

Just as guidance, that area grows this extended list of ultra tropical fruits, all of them being grown up outdoors, of course.  I've also had an extended list of tropical and ultra tropical palms growing in that region, I think I've posted it as well several years ago here in PalmTalk. I got them from several gardening pages, I could try to find them if anyone wants to. 

- Koubo fruit
- Salak - Snake fruit 
- Mangosteen
- Rambutan
- Guava
- Carambola - Star Fruit
- Pitaya - Dragon Fruit
- Sapote
- Jujube
- Longan
- Litchi
- Pitanga
- Passionfruit - Maracuya
- Cherimoya - Custard Apple

That zone also produces thousands of tons of all kinds of mangoes and avocados. Although mangoes and avocados also grow in my area as well, they're not ultra tropicals. 

Sources: https://www.campodebenamayor.es/frutas-tropicales/#1539801027729-81719242-f05b  
https://matadornetwork.com/es/frutas-tropicales-malaga/ 
https://www.diariosur.es/malagaenlamesa/frutas-extranas-pueden-20181108211551-nt.html

The less rainy place, the better chances for growing coconuts in the Mediterranean winters. Do you know if is better in Cadiz, Malaga, Almeria, Motril? Maybe another part of south Spain is drier in the winter?

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Alicante
38 minutes ago, Stelios said:

The less rainy place, the better chances for growing coconuts in the Mediterranean winters. Do you know if is better in Cadiz, Malaga, Almeria, Motril? Maybe another part of south Spain is drier in the winter?

In that case, the best chance to have them would be the SE coastal zone of the province of Almería, which according to the official AEMET map has an annual average above 20°C as well as it's a dry semiarid climate that gets little rain during winters. Actually the wettest season there is during mid-late Autumn where avg highs are still above 20°C and the sunshine hours of that area are high during winters too, around 3.000h annually but sadly that area is very very unknown as the well known areas start going eastwards from Motril. 

The prime example is the town of Adra in Almería which appears in that area with +20°C annual average in the official AEMET map and it's also as well a confirmed 11a Hardiness Zone area, the latter being confirmed by an extended gardening work based on AEMET data made by a Spanish Agricultural Engineer and Biologist that's as well a Catedratic in the University of Murcia. 

Looking at Motril's official 1981-2010 averages the coldest month is 17.6°C and 9.0°C and Adra is even slightly warmer than that. Adra's January averages would be around 18/10 and August ones around 31/22 and there might be a real chance since only 3 months have average highs under 20°C in Adra, because this applies to Motril and Adra is slightly warmer than Motril.   

Edited by Alicante
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Aleitalyyy

thank you very much dear for sharing the photos and the history of the nearby coconut in malagano ... I am very happy with this ... really! gives hope ... if you have more photos or stories to share we are grateful ...

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GottmitAlex
9 hours ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

But it doesn't really count if it is NOT planted IN the ground!  The whole concept of growing them in marginal climates outside their normal range, IS to successfully grow them IN the ground with little or no protection most winters, but NOT just grow them in pots!

John

THIS

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Mr. Coconut Palm
17 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

THIS

So, you agree, Alex?

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gurugu

I lived in Motril for a couple of years  and it froze uptown area, reaching -1,2Cº once. Downtown Motril is 50 mts. a.s.l., but uptown places can reach over 100 mts a.s.l. and northern winds coming from Sierra Lújar (2.200 mts a.s.l.) make temperatures in the valley drop significantly.

I don´t think any place all along the south coast of Spain reach a yearly  average of 20Cº. It is more wishful thinking than facts. Maybe dowtown big cities such as Cádiz, Málaga or Almería, due to big cities heat islands. Which, by the way, would be the best places to try to grow cocos in the ground.

There are many places from Nerja to Almuñecar and from Motril to Almería, where mountains die just on the sea, and I think these places would also be perfect spots to grow cocos too. The closer the mountains to the sea, the warmer in winter. Places such as La Punta de la Mona and Cotobro , near Almuñecar, for instance.

Here you have delonix regia in Torrenueva.

https://www.google.com/maps/@36.7047575,-3.4901448,3a,15y,230.01h,104.2t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sYVBOCQVsp8nE6O73NoiSkA!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

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Mr. Coconut Palm
2 hours ago, gurugu said:

I lived in Motril for a couple of years  and it froze uptown area, reaching -1,2Cº once. Downtown Motril is 50 mts. a.s.l., but uptown places can reach over 100 mts a.s.l. and northern winds coming from Sierra Lújar (2.200 mts a.s.l.) make temperatures in the valley drop significantly.

I don´t think any place all along the south coast of Spain reach a yearly  average of 20Cº. It is more wishful thinking than facts. Maybe dowtown big cities such as Cádiz, Málaga or Almería, due to big cities heat islands. Which, by the way, would be the best places to try to grow cocos in the ground.

There are many places from Nerja to Almuñecar and from Motril to Almería, where mountains die just on the sea, and I think these places would also be perfect spots to grow cocos too. The closer the mountains to the sea, the warmer in winter. Places such as La Punta de la Mona and Cotobro , near Almuñecar, for instance.

Here you have delonix regia in Torrenueva.

https://www.google.com/maps/@36.7047575,-3.4901448,3a,15y,230.01h,104.2t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sYVBOCQVsp8nE6O73NoiSkA!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

Beautiful Royal Poinciana.  I had no idea they could be grown in southernmost Spain.  Do they ever flower and seed there?  If they can be grown to that height there, then there is a chance that one or two of the more cold hardy varieties of Coconut Palm could survive in a perfectly protected microclimate area on the south side of a two or three story building, if planted right up next to the building.

John

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GottmitAlex
5 hours ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

So, you agree, Alex?

Of course John.

Zone pushing implies: in ground

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Alicante
3 hours ago, gurugu said:

I lived in Motril for a couple of years  and it froze uptown area, reaching -1,2Cº once. Downtown Motril is 50 mts. a.s.l., but uptown places can reach over 100 mts a.s.l. and northern winds coming from Sierra Lújar (2.200 mts a.s.l.) make temperatures in the valley drop significantly.

I don´t think any place all along the south coast of Spain reach a yearly  average of 20Cº. It is more wishful thinking than facts. Maybe dowtown big cities such as Cádiz, Málaga or Almería, due to big cities heat islands. Which, by the way, would be the best places to try to grow cocos in the ground.

There are many places from Nerja to Almuñecar and from Motril to Almería, where mountains die just on the sea, and I think these places would also be perfect spots to grow cocos too. The closer the mountains to the sea, the warmer in winter. Places such as La Punta de la Mona and Cotobro , near Almuñecar, for instance.

Here you have delonix regia in Torrenueva.

https://www.google.com/maps/@36.7047575,-3.4901448,3a,15y,230.01h,104.2t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sYVBOCQVsp8nE6O73NoiSkA!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

The AEMET station of Motril is located in Motril Puerto (port, right by the coast) yes actually when we refer to Motril it's the coastline, the town itself is more inland at some kilometers from the coast in a higher altitude just as you've said. The town of Motril has still lot of potential though, but it's cooler than the coastal part as obvious. 

But I have to differ on the +20ºC annual average in Spain because that's shown on the official AEMET map. I saw it first in an AEMET bulletin and it's also available on their website. You can see it by clicking "temperatura media" and then making a full zoom on the southern coast. 2 coastal stretches are painted in deep yellow which means annual averages above 20ºC, one of them being exactly in Adra. The other areas are unpopulated areas or too small towns. Since Almería for example has an annual average of 19.1ºC (1981-2010 and in the airport, without any UHI) I don't find it impossible for the warmest spots to have 20ºC. But obviously that's just a couple of small spots, the warmest mainland Spain does have. 

http://www.aemet.es/es/serviciosclimaticos/datosclimatologicos/valoresclimatologicos Here is the official AEMET website if you want to check it. 
 

50 minutes ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Beautiful Royal Poinciana.  I had no idea they could be grown in southernmost Spain.  Do they ever flower and seed there?  If they can be grown to that height there, then there is a chance that one or two of the more cold hardy varieties of Coconut Palm could survive in a perfectly protected microclimate area on the south side of a two or three story building, if planted right up next to the building.

John

Royal Poincianas (flamboyans) aren't uncommon in the southern coast of Spain. There are many public ones in gardens and parks in the provinces of Cádiz, Málaga and Granada. 
The biggest amount of specimens are found within the province of Málaga. Yes, they do flower but I can't say exactly how often. I think yearly, but I can't confirm it. 
In the following pages you have some pics of flowered Poincianas within the area and province of Málaga. I'll post one, there are more inside the links:

https://archivo.infojardin.com/tema/delonix-regia-ha-florecido-en-la-peninsula-iberica.388148/
https://www.infojardin.com/fotos/displayimage.php-album=1261&pos=12.htm
https://twitter.com/malagaconacento/status/1158677329666854912
https://www.infojardin.com/fotos/displayimage.php-album=1261&pos=15.htm
https://medioambientepaisajesyciudadverde.wordpress.com/2020/07/17/el-flamboyant/

EBRy4ryXkAAeUUB.jpg

Edited by Alicante
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Alicante
52 minutes ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Beautiful Royal Poinciana.  I had no idea they could be grown in southernmost Spain.  Do they ever flower and seed there?  If they can be grown to that height there, then there is a chance that one or two of the more cold hardy varieties of Coconut Palm could survive in a perfectly protected microclimate area on the south side of a two or three story building, if planted right up next to the building.

John

Do you think so? Delonix Regia / Royal Poinciana are obviously not a very common type of tree in the southern coast of Spain but it's neither that uncommon. 
For example, check the list of tropical and ultra tropicals fruits I wrote yesterday, well I forgot to put the Papaya which is the 4rd most grown there. But Papayas grow in my area as well. 

- Koubo fruit
- Salak - Snake fruit 
- Mangosteen
- Rambutan
- Guava
- Carambola - Star Fruit
- Pitaya - Dragon Fruit
- Sapote
- Jujube
- Longan
- Litchi
- Pitanga
- Papaya
- Passionfruit - Maracuya
- Cherimoya - Custard Apple

I've also posted sources where they mention all of these fruits grow in that area. Just as @gurugu said, that area is "naturally blessed" because the mountains literally reach the sea in some points, thus giving them an extreme natural shelter, that's why they can grow such a crazy list of ultra tropicals, whatever if it's fruits, palms, trees or flowers. 


But could a coconut really do it planted on the ground? Maybe on the perfect spot in the warmest microclimate. I think (at least by average daytimes) that it's as warm as mainland Europe can get during winters, but I still firmly think that a more extreme cold spell could barren a coconut. But well, since Snake fruits can be grown (ultra tropical fruit from Sumatra) maybe there is one chance. After all, the potted one has survived 7 winters in a row outside without protection and it's growing as well. But I don't know. 

I still think the most solid chance is within Cyprus, but that's geographically in Asia / Middle East at a lower latitude. They do also grow in Israel and northern Egypt. 

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Alicante

Here is a good collection of pics and info about some of the palms planted in Parque de Málaga, the main park in downtown Málaga. 
It's a safe University link, it's a PDF made out of Scientific Work with real pics made inside the park. 
https://dialnet.unirioja.es/descarga/articulo/7704460.pdf

Most of the palms can be seen with pics in the PDF from the link. The list includes: 

- Dypsis leptocheilos
- Dypsis decaryi
- Ravenea rivularis
- Hyophorbe verschaffeltii
- Latania loddigesii
- Latania lontaroides
- Dictyosperma album
- Jubaeopsis caffra
- Gaussia maya
- Howea forsteriana
- Howea belmoreana
- Pritchardia munroi
 

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Alicante

This is the full list of palms, plants and flowers that are grown inside the main park of Málaga. 
Taken from this site, it has many pics as well: https://jardinessinfronteras.com/2018/12/20/el-parque-de-malaga-un-paraiso-en-la-ciudad/

Acalypha wilkesiana 

Acer negundo 

Acoelorrhaphe wrightii 

Acokanthera oblongifolia

Acrocomia aculeata

Agapathus africanus

Araucaria bidwillii

Araucaria columnaris 

Araucaria heterophylla 

Archontophoenix alexandrae

Archontophoenix cunninghamiana

Archontophoenix purpurea

Arenga engleri

Bauhinia purpurea

Beaucarnea recurvata

Beaumontia grandiflora

Bismarckia nobilis 

Brachychiton acerifolius

Brahea armata

Brahea brandegeei

Brahea calcarea

Brugmansia arborea

Brunfelsia pauciflora 

Butia capitata 

Butia paraguayensis  

Butia yatay

Calendula officinalis

Callistemon viminalis  

Codiaeum variegatum

Caryota mitis 

Caryota obtusa

Caryota urens

Cedrela odorata 

Ceiba speciosa. 

Celtis australis 

Cephalotaxus harringtonia

Cestrum nocturnum 

Chamaedorea costaricana 

Chamaedorea elegans

Chamaerops humilis 

Chambeyronia macrocarpa

Citharexylum spinosum

Citrus aurantium 

Clivia miniata 

Coccoloba uvifera 

Coccothrinax alta

Coccothrinax fragrans

Combretum indicum

Cryosophila stauracantha

Cryosophila warscewiczii 

Cycas revoluta

Dombeya x cayeuxii

Dracaena deremensis

Dracaena draco 

Dypsis leptocheilos  

Dypsis lutescens 

Dypsis madagascariensis  

Encephalartos laurentianus

Erythrina caffra 

Euphorbia milii  

Ficus microcarpa

Furcraea selloa

Gaussia maya 

Ginkgo biloba 

Grevillea robusta

Harpephyllum caffrum 

Hedera helix 

Hemerocallis fulva

Hibiscus arnottianus

Hibiscus rosa sinensis 

Howea belmoreana 

Howea forsteriana

Hyophorbe verschaffeltii 

Inga edulis 

Jacaranda mimosifolia 

Jasminum officinale

Jubaeopsis caffra  

Kigelia africana 

Lagestroemia indica  

Latania loddigesii  

Lilium candidum 

Livistona australis 

Livistona benthamii

Livistona chinensis 

Livistona decipiens 

Livistona decora

Livistona nitida 

Macadamia integrifolia

Macrozamia moorei

Magnolia grandiflora

Meryta denhamii

Montanoa bipinnatifida 

Monstera deliciosa 

Murraya paniculata

Musa x paradisiaca

Nannorrhops ritchieana 

Pandanus utilis 

Paraserianthes lophantha 

Parajubaea torallyi 

Persea americana 

Petrea volubilis

Phoenix canariensis

Phoenix dactilifera 

Phoenix roebelenii

Phoenix rupicola 

Phyllostachys aurea

Pinanga coronata 

Pinus canariensis

Pittosporum tobira

Platanus xhispanica

Plumeria rubra / Plumeria alba

Podocarpus neriifolius

Pritchardia hillebrandii 

Ptychosperma caryotoides

Philodendron xanadu

Ptychosperma elegans 

Ptychosperma waitianum 

Quercus ilex 

Quercus robur

Ravenea rivularis 

Rhapis excelsa 

Rhapis humilis 

Rhopalostylis baueri 

Roystonea borinquena 

Roystonea oleracea  

Roystonea regia

Rondeletia odorata

Russelia equisetiformis

Sabal bermudana

Sabal dominguensis 

Sabal mauritiiformis 

Sabal palmetto 

Spathiphyllum wallisii 

Spathodea campanulata 

Schefflera arboricola 

Strelitzia nicolai 

Strelitzia reginae

Tagetes

Tabebuia heterophylla 

Tabebuia rosea)

Taxodium mucronatum 

Tecoma stans

Tetraclinis articulata

Trachycarpus fortunei

Trithrinax brasiliensis

Veitchia arecina

Wallichia oblongifolia 

Washingtonia filifera

Washingtonia robusta 

Wodyetia bifurcata

Yucca gigantea 

Yucca elephantipes

Roystoneas-Malaga-Park.png

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Alicante

And here it goes a "Roystonea Jungle" near Málaga, as well as Dypsis Decaryi and Biscmarckia Nobilis one, amongst other palms. 

https://archivo.infojardin.com/tema/fotos-de-buenos-ejemplares-de-roystonea-regia-en-vivero-malaga-y-limpieza-de-tronco.202730/

Lots of pics inside the source, I won't post them here because it includes people in them. I'll just stick to put the link so you can enjoy it!

I don't know exactly which kind of air do they have in the southern coast of Spain (especially Málaga) but Roystoneas grow there like if they were native plants. As I've read inside this forum from other people, it looks completely out of place within Europe when it comes to gardening and palms. And I can agree for example comparing with my area which is actually very warm and the climate is not too different from Málaga, but in my zone some of the palms from that list won't grow and Roystoneas don't grow like champs here. 

Besides in my area, Bismarckia Nobilis grow like if they were in their home as well. I will post soon pics of a "palm hunting" trip I made just to find rare palms and I found real gems, I found lots of lots and giant Bismarckias that grew up a ton in barely few years as well as I've found a very tall Roystonea in a private garden. 

I'll make another separate thread for that. Here below is the pic of the "Roystonea jungle" in Málaga, the Info Jardín source from above has many more. Enjoy! ^_^

viu1277326994l.JPG

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GottmitAlex
1 hour ago, GottmitAlex said:

Of course John.

Zone pushing implies: in ground

At almost 33° N. (32.51°) to be exact.

 

 

IMG_20211109_141352_1_copy_2000x1125.jpg

IMG_20211109_141234_1_copy_1125x2000.jpg

IMG_20211109_141245_1_copy_1125x2000.jpg

IMG_20211109_141253_1_copy_2000x1125.jpg

IMG_20211109_141217_1_copy_1125x2000.jpg

IMG_20211109_141224_1_copy_1125x2000.jpg

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Maltese coconut project

True but it's also true that at an altitude of a rooftop they are also more exposed to wind especially cold northern and North Western winds 

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Maltese coconut project

Which area do you live in? (just to have an idea of your climate) 

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GottmitAlex
11 hours ago, Maltese coconut project said:

Which area do you live in? (just to have an idea of your climate) 

In the border area between San Diego, California and Tijuana, Baja California. 12-14 miles inland

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Maltese coconut project

I apologise but I was supposed to ask Mr Coconut palm the question regarding area (I think I already asked you that question long ago and you did inform me about your area too,, sorry for the seemingly repeated question) 

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Maltese coconut project

Which area do you live in? (just to have an idea of your climate) 

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Alicante

@GottmitAlex @Mr. Coconut Palm @Maltese coconut project What do you think about the growing possibilities in this city within the province of Almería?
I just found this official WMO data about this city, didn't know about it before, turns out it's the 2nd biggest city in the province of Almería. 
It's naturally protected as well as it gets constant heat currents from Africa. These are the averages: 

https://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=2904

- Only 3 months have average highs under 21ºC / 70F
- The coldest month is January with an average high of 17.5ºC / 63.5F 
- The annual average is 19.87ºC / 67.8F and the summers are hot with very warm nights. 

Do you think coconuts hold any chance in this climate? Delonix Regia / Royal Poincianas grow in Roquetas de Mar if that's an indicator. 
 

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GottmitAlex
8 hours ago, Alicante said:

@GottmitAlex @Mr. Coconut Palm @Maltese coconut project What do you think about the growing possibilities in this city within the province of Almería?
I just found this official WMO data about this city, didn't know about it before, turns out it's the 2nd biggest city in the province of Almería. 
It's naturally protected as well as it gets constant heat currents from Africa. These are the averages: 

https://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=2904

- Only 3 months have average highs under 21ºC / 70F
- The coldest month is January with an average high of 17.5ºC / 63.5F 
- The annual average is 19.87ºC / 67.8F and the summers are hot with very warm nights. 

Do you think coconuts hold any chance in this climate? Delonix Regia / Royal Poincianas grow in Roquetas de Mar if that's an indicator. 
 

@Alicante

What are the average lows for that city?

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Alicante
8 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

@Alicante

What are the average lows for that city?

All of the monthly averages are in the World Meteorological Organization / WMO website.

This is the link: https://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=2904

There you have all highs/lows during each month. 

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GottmitAlex
1 hour ago, Alicante said:

All of the monthly averages are in the World Meteorological Organization / WMO website.

This is the link: https://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=2904

There you have all highs/lows during each month. 

The website is not opening on my phone. I'll try later on my computer.

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