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ahosey01

More Sabals

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ahosey01

I have Sabal causiarum, uresana, Birmingham, Lisa and etonia.  Today I will also have two variegated palmettos.  Also I have Serenoa repens which in my mind is like an honorary Sabal.

This is my favorite genus.  I need more.  Tell me which ones I need!

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Fusca

How about mexicana and guatemalensis?  If you're OK with growing from seed let me know.  Riverside is another big one you can easily find in SoCal.

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PalmatierMeg

Sabals bermudana, rosei, blackburniana

Try some of the many variations of Sabal minor:

Louisiana

Cherokee

Alabama

Emerald Isle Giant

Dwarfs: Blountstown, Wakulla, Chipola

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ahosey01
47 minutes ago, PalmatierMeg said:

Sabals bermudana, rosei, blackburniana

Try some of the many variations of Sabal minor:

Louisiana

Cherokee

Alabama

Emerald Isle Giant

Dwarfs: Blountstown, Wakulla, Chipola

I heard somewhere you have miamiensis…. Accurate?

Also - where does an Arizona boy find such species? And how are they in full sun? I would like all of them!!!

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ahosey01
3 hours ago, Fusca said:

How about mexicana and guatemalensis?  If you're OK with growing from seed let me know.  Riverside is another big one you can easily find in SoCal.

Interested. What is the germination method for these and how is the success rate?

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Fusca

They are easy to germinate - no special treatment needed.  Community pot or baggie method works.  :)

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PalmatierMeg

I should have Sabal miamiensis and miamiensis x mexicana?   Hybrid seeds this fall. Also, Blountstown Dwarf and maybe Wakulla Dwarf and Emerald Isle Giant seeds

The care of all Sabal spp is the same: lots of sun and heat. I germinate all my Sabals in community pots with well-draining soil mix. They are not fussy about soil

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Meangreen94z

Sabal Mauritiiformis is unique

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OC2Texaspalmlvr
1 hour ago, Meangreen94z said:

Sabal Mauritiiformis is unique

This is hands down the most tropical looking Sabal which in turns is the least cold hardy =/ Beautiful palm tho. Sabal Riverside I think is a must have, super fast for sabal speed. Comparable to as bizzie in leaf output. Sabal Lousiana if your looking for the tallest s.minor 

T J 

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newtopalmsMD

Sabal Brazoria-New growth comes in bluish green.  Pretty fast growth with lots of watering. Very cold hardy

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newtopalmsMD

I just saw in line that Wickenburg AZ only gets 12 inches of rain a year (and no Snow) and zone 9. Many Sabals want lots of water.  Here is a partial post from another sabal discussion by sonoranfans about Sabals in sonoran desert:

Having grown several sables in the sonoran desert(east of phoenix) I can offer some experience. I have grown sabal blackburniana(some call it palmetto), sabal bermudana, sabal minor, sabal uresana and sabal causiarum. I used drip irrigation(4 drippers per palm) and in modified clay soil I watered once a week, 50 gallons per palm very slowly(8 gallons/hr) to get more depth. My sabal blackburnianas had fans 6' across, so these were bigger fans than any sabals I have yet seen here in florida. Sables struggle at a young age in an arid desert clime, its best not to plant them out until they are 15 gallon size and then use overhead netting to prevent dessication in the heat. Sabals dont like full sun in the desert as they do not have the blue/grey leaves of the bismarckias that prevent radiative heating of the fronds by the reflection of light. Absorption of sunlight and the subsequent leaflet dessication in the dry heat is the major difference in the desert climate vs coastal more humid climes. Bismarcias are only surpassed by brahea armatas and hyphaene in their tolerance of 105-110F dry heat, they seem to like it and grow faster if they get enough water. In that kind of heat, sabals are stunted, they grow more slowly. My best sabal blackburniana was under queens and a large chinese elm(to the west), it was a terrific green and held ~25 fronds probably had just a 3 hours a day of direct morning sun. I had another one that was in more open sun(6hrs 8 am to 2PM), and the lower fronds bronzed every year from the summer sun, held only 12-15 fronds. In the desert its the late day sun that is the most damaging(dessicating) as the heat peaks at 5PM in summer. My sabal minor just didnt like the sun in AZ, it was the weakest of all and was burned repeatedly even though it only saw 3 hrs of mid day sun. The sabal uresana is a tough one, great in the desert as its blue fronds reflected alot of light. Grow an uresana and it will be much easier, but I'd still protect it from late day sun when young.

So, my advice is that if you are inland low desert, you have a very different climate than florida or coastal california. Sabals outside the blue uresana, will do best when protected from sun at an early age and when protected from late day sun through its life. I have had lots of "full sun" plantings cooked/killed in the desert, its become a bit of a joke with my wife and I. Good luck!

See topic "Sabal Palmetto in low desert heat"

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PalmatierMeg

Sabal pumos is native to drier, higher elevation areas of the US SW and reportedly prefers less water and humidity. The problem is finding it. Mauritiiformis is the most cold sensitive Sabal. I suggest you do frequent internet searches for the rarer Sabals. You never know when one might turn up unless you look. Sometimes Plant Delights in NC comes up with unique Sabals, often one-time only offerings. You have to check often and move fast. Their stuff is not cheap nor is shipping but they can be the only source out there for new/rare stuff like Sabal minor ‘Lawrence’. I got Blountstown Dwarf, Wakulla Dwarf, Chipola Dwarf, Spring Hills Dwarf, ‘Welfare’ (TX) & Emerald Isle Giant from them. Also Sabal palmetto ‘Mocksville’. 

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amh

Does anyone have more information on Sabal minor "Welfare"? I'd like to find some seed or access to the wild plants before the "ghost town" is plowed under to make a suburb.

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amh
On 8/1/2021 at 9:47 AM, PalmatierMeg said:

Sabal pumos is native to drier, higher elevation areas of the US SW and reportedly prefers less water and humidity. The problem is finding it. Mauritiiformis is the most cold sensitive Sabal. I suggest you do frequent internet searches for the rarer Sabals. You never know when one might turn up unless you look. Sometimes Plant Delights in NC comes up with unique Sabals, often one-time only offerings. You have to check often and move fast. Their stuff is not cheap nor is shipping but they can be the only source out there for new/rare stuff like Sabal minor ‘Lawrence’. I got Blountstown Dwarf, Wakulla Dwarf, Chipola Dwarf, Spring Hills Dwarf, ‘Welfare’ (TX) & Emerald Isle Giant from them. Also Sabal palmetto ‘Mocksville’. 

Is your "welfare" at fruiting age?

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amh
On 7/31/2021 at 6:01 PM, ahosey01 said:

Interested. What is the germination method for these and how is the success rate?

Mexicana germinates very easy, they just prefer warm temperatures.

On 7/31/2021 at 7:01 PM, Fusca said:

They are easy to germinate - no special treatment needed.  Community pot or baggie method works.  :)

20 of the seeds you sent have germinated so far.

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Meangreen94z
12 hours ago, amh said:

Not in stock, but where are the originals located?

I don’t think they’ve had those for several years, I posted it for reference. It’s atleast a photo of the population.

That town is supposedly just a few buildings, you’ve inspired me to take a trip down there and try to locate the population. Last Sunday would have been perfect had I known.

 I’m not exactly sure how “different” this population is and I figure they were planted there by a resident at some point long ago. I could be wrong. Palmetto State Park has a natural population and is probably with an hour east

910FE31B-8E9A-4248-89EC-5A58EF95427D.jpeg

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PalmatierMeg
11 hours ago, amh said:

Is your "welfare" at fruiting age?

No

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amh
4 hours ago, Meangreen94z said:

I don’t think they’ve had those for several years, I posted it for reference. It’s atleast a photo of the population.

That town is supposedly just a few buildings, you’ve inspired me to take a trip down there and try to locate the population. Last Sunday would have been perfect had I known.

 I’m not exactly sure how “different” this population is and I figure they were planted there by a resident at some point long ago. I could be wrong. Palmetto State Park has a natural population and is probably with an hour east

910FE31B-8E9A-4248-89EC-5A58EF95427D.jpeg

Welfare is just north of Boerne, and I'm thinking the palms must be along one of the Joshua creeks. Someone in the native plant society may know the location.

Supposedly this form will trunk, but that could just be from growing over rock. I'm skeptical about anything where the hill country is part of the lore, because its a huge marketing gimmick that is just a fictitious as the history on a bourbon bottle.

Edited by amh

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necturus

I would have thought a trunking sabal near Boerne would get a lot more press, so I am also skeptical. Why wouldn't it be as well-known as S. brazoriensis?

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amh
2 hours ago, necturus said:

I would have thought a trunking sabal near Boerne would get a lot more press, so I am also skeptical. Why wouldn't it be as well-known as S. brazoriensis?

I'm more skeptical after reading the bear creek description. Luckenbach is located in Guillespie county, southeast of Fredericksburg. There is a Bear creek in Guillespie county, but it is east of Boerne.

https://www.plantdelights.com/products/sabal-minor-bear-creek

I'd like to have these varieties, but there seems to be some geographic confusion at best.

 

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Meangreen94z
3 hours ago, amh said:

I'm more skeptical after reading the bear creek description. Luckenbach is located in Guillespie county, southeast of Fredericksburg. There is a Bear creek in Guillespie county, but it is east of Boerne.

https://www.plantdelights.com/products/sabal-minor-bear-creek

I'd like to have these varieties, but there seems to be some geographic confusion at best.

 

They are next to each other, nobody in Texas outside of those counties knows where the borders start and end, let alone North Carolina. The little descriptions on PDN’s website are hearsay from whoever collected and sold them the seed. I’ve seen plenty of inaccuracies.

As far as why the prior lack of interest? Atleast from the photos they don’t have the stature of Brazoriensis. I’m sure from a passing glance they appear to be typical Sabal Minor. Brazoria county is also not the hill country, just about anything sticks out from the thick low brush that makes up 99% of the view. I lived in Manvel, it’s not a scenic area of the state.

A56A43B9-7F0E-44E0-AC65-15BFA88DFBF8.jpeg

B2870FB0-AF0A-4B9B-A7FA-6954EDAD5194.jpeg

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