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Bismarckia nobilis north carolina?

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ZPalms

Anyone have experience with this palm in north carolina? can or do they do well here?

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
1 hour ago, ZPalms said:

Anyone have experience with this palm in north carolina? can or do they do well here?

They wouldn’t make it through our winters without protection, that’s for sure. Palms R Kool on YouTube is growing one in Charlotte and it seems to be doing okay, but been a slow grower for him. Maybe they don’t like clay soil? 

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ZPalms
13 minutes ago, NC_Palm_Enthusiast said:

They wouldn’t make it through our winters without protection, that’s for sure. Palms R Kool on YouTube is growing one in Charlotte and it seems to be doing okay, but been a slow grower for him. Maybe they don’t like clay soil? 

Oh I'm subscribed to him and I didn't know he had one I'll check it out, Is it a palm that would be impossible to protect after it gets giant and palmpedia says "It is best to grow this palm in a well draining soil, but palms grown in dense clay soils seems to do pretty well. Keeping the soil moist sure seems to keep this palm happier" and another site says "This tree tolerates a variety of soil types, including sand, loam, and clay" and we have plenty of that here!

I just watched one of his videos and he had to put his back into a pot because of a cold night and that kind of puts me off because It's bad enough I need to bring my coconut in I don't want to drag more giant trees into the house :floor:

Edited by ZPalms
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Jtee

I wouldn’t even attempt to grow a bizmark in NC unless you wanna put effort into it. 

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ZPalms
17 minutes ago, Jtee said:

I wouldn’t even attempt to grow a bizmark in NC unless you wanna put effort into it. 

Yeah it's not worth it for me, I don't want too many species where I have to give my 100% to protect them and my coconut is just enough for me

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Jimhardy

This is also one palm that you can't just dig up as they are very root sensitive.

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Chester B

His latest video says don’t bother with Bismarkia in his climate. Poor performer. 
 

Bottom line this is a tender palm most suited to Florida and California. 

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Palmfarmer
9 minutes ago, Chester B said:

His latest video says don’t bother with Bismarkia in his climate. Poor performer. 
 

Bottom line this is a tender palm most suited to Florida and California. 

PALMS R KOOL? yeah it has performed bad this year he said. He did buy a small seedling once though and it did grew pretty well untill it had spear pull and died. Wonder how his other palms will do. and if they all survive how would that yard look since things are not exactly spaced out? 

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Chester B
9 minutes ago, Palmfarmer said:

PALMS R KOOL? yeah it has performed bad this year he said. He did buy a small seedling once though and it did grew pretty well untill it had spear pull and died. Wonder how his other palms will do. and if they all survive how would that yard look since things are not exactly spaced out? 

I don’t think he’ll have to worry about that. He’s zone pushing and when a bad winter comes along I have a feeling he’ll have some losses.  I know he does take some protection measures but when they start getting too big it will be hard to protect everything. Just take a look at what happened in Texas. Anything in the east can be exposed to a real arctic blast. 

Edited by Chester B
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OC2Texaspalmlvr
22 minutes ago, Chester B said:

His latest video says don’t bother with Bismarkia in his climate. Poor performer. 
 

Bottom line this is a tender palm most suited to Florida and California. 

I wouldn't call this palm tender one bit. Palmageddon only got 2 of mine which I'm pretty sure I could've saved if I had trunk cut early. Bismarckia are as cold hardy as queens in my opinion but with way more wow factor =) 

T J 

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Will Simpson
15 hours ago, ZPalms said:

Anyone have experience with this palm in north carolina? can or do they do well here?

The best place in NC for the least protection needs is probably Harkers Island where the zone maps show 8B . That's a very protected area with some " big water "  around it ,  and it averages only 2 degrees colder  in winter than those coldest places in Florida that are in the northern panhandle . 

Still , trunk protection would be needed some years , but that's easy using the Xmas light , blanket method . They wouldn't  grow as fast as Washys so protecting would be easier since you wouldn't  have to worry  about trying to protect a Washy " sky duster "  at some future date ,  but they wouldn't recover from frond damage as fast as Washys do either  . 

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ahosey01

I have one in a hot 9A in Arizona and it did well unprotected through its first winter.  Saw dips into the mid-20s on more than one occasion and never blinked.  Those temps last a few minutes to a few hours for me, though.  For you, they’d probably be days.  Most Bismarckia don’t even live through the big winter storms in the Houston area they get every 10-20 years.  Mines planted in clay but its 100+ daily during the summer around here and we get probably 1/10th the precip you do in the winter.

Rock solid performer in the hottest, driest climates with enough water.  And then obviously Florida and California because Florida and California.

Edited by ahosey01
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Jimhardy

Bone dry in the cold is a good way to go with Bizzys ...

I had one on the porch when it got down to 23F,the soil and palm

were extremely dry...the spear didn't pull it just dried out halfway down the new spear

and broke off but no pull- no moisture = no fungal issues.

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Palmfarmer
13 hours ago, OC2Texaspalmlvr said:

I wouldn't call this palm tender one bit. Palmageddon only got 2 of mine which I'm pretty sure I could've saved if I had trunk cut early. Bismarckia are as cold hardy as queens in my opinion but with way more wow factor =) 

T J 

Definitly pretty hardy palm my small one saw 24 this winter 0 burn. However i dont think they can withstand prolonged chilly tempratures. that mixed with humidity is what is killing PALMS R KOOL's Bismarckia I think. 

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D Palm

I have 3 in N. Florida zone 8b and they have seen low 20’s many nights. I mulch heavy around the base and that’s it. The daytime highs are 60/70/80’ in the winter and it’s usually only a few hours in the low 20’s right before sunrise. Frost does occasionally burn the tips, especially hard freezes on the old fronds at 3&9 position. Maybe the temp shooting up fast at daybreak is the saving grace for my Bismarck’s. Only had 1 spear break off on 1 of 3 Bismarck’s from fungus (prob due to no growth and wet cold temps) and 3 of 3 spear pull on queens this spring for some hardiness comparison. All are OK now. 

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ZPalms

What are some alternative to bismarkias?

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Xenon
1 hour ago, ZPalms said:

What are some alternative to bismarkias?

Closest in color and form would be Sabal uresana

Brahea armata is smaller and doesn't look its best in humid climates but does survive (at least in Houston-Galveston). 

These are different in form but are silver-blue:

Nannorhops ritchiana (silver form)

Chamaerops humilis silver

Sereone repens silver

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GottmitAlex
3 hours ago, D Palm said:

I have 3 in N. Florida zone 8b and they have seen low 20’s many nights. I mulch heavy around the base and that’s it. The daytime highs are 60/70/80’ in the winter and it’s usually only a few hours in the low 20’s right before sunrise. Frost does occasionally burn the tips, especially hard freezes on the old fronds at 3&9 position. Maybe the temp shooting up fast at daybreak is the saving grace for my Bismarck’s. Only had 1 spear break off on 1 of 3 Bismarck’s from fungus (prob due to no growth and wet cold temps) and 3 of 3 spear pull on queens this spring for some hardiness comparison. All are OK now. 

Pics please

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ZPalms
36 minutes ago, Xenon said:

Closest in color and form would be Sabal uresana

Brahea armata is smaller and doesn't look its best in humid climates but does survive (at least in Houston-Galveston). 

These are different in form but are silver-blue:

Nannorhops ritchiana (silver form)

Chamaerops humilis silver

Sereone repens silver

I've been thinking about Sabal Uresana but I'll check these others out too thanks! Do you know any species doesn't matter the color that has giant leaf stature like the bismarckia?

Edited by ZPalms
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Palmfarmer
6 hours ago, D Palm said:

I have 3 in N. Florida zone 8b and they have seen low 20’s many nights. I mulch heavy around the base and that’s it. The daytime highs are 60/70/80’ in the winter and it’s usually only a few hours in the low 20’s right before sunrise. Frost does occasionally burn the tips, especially hard freezes on the old fronds at 3&9 position. Maybe the temp shooting up fast at daybreak is the saving grace for my Bismarck’s. Only had 1 spear break off on 1 of 3 Bismarck’s from fungus (prob due to no growth and wet cold temps) and 3 of 3 spear pull on queens this spring for some hardiness comparison. All are OK now. 

Had no idea they where that hardy. Thats impressive. This makes me think Bismarck is more or less bulletproof in my city, because queens are absolutly everywhere. Yes its kind of the same here, cold only at night for a short while then it usually shoots up to 25c in the day. I have one more thing that helps me though and that is very low humidity. 

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Palmfarmer
3 hours ago, ZPalms said:

I've been thinking about Sabal Uresana but I'll check these others out too thanks! Do you know any species doesn't matter the color that has giant leaf stature like the bismarckia?

Some Copernicia Baileyana have giant fronds, but they dont look too similar. It would not survive your climate either. 

I think Sabal Brazoriensis is a palm you like that would do well in your climate as well as Sabal Uresana that has allready been mentioned. 

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
9 hours ago, ZPalms said:

I've been thinking about Sabal Uresana but I'll check these others out too thanks! Do you know any species doesn't matter the color that has giant leaf stature like the bismarckia?

I just planted a 3gal uresana in 8a/b Emerald Isle, NC. Will keep you updated on how it does. According to Gary Hollar there is a huge one in Beaufort, NC - but I haven’t yet had a chance to go check it out. 

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LeonardHolmes
On 7/31/2021 at 1:50 PM, Will Simpson said:

The best place in NC for the least protection needs is probably Harkers Island where the zone maps show 8B .

The northern Outer Banks (Hatteras to Corolla) are in technically 8B now too.  I imagine Emerald Isle is actually warmer but for some reason they left the Bogue Banks in 8A.  

How long until new maps?

I planted a few Sabals on Colington Island (From Gary's Nursery). Front row: S. domingensis, S. uresana (blue),  Back row: S. x brazoriansis, NC Sabal palmetto and S. birmingham.  I have a couple of Washingtonias that will need a bit of help.  I wouldn't consider a Bismarkia.

IMG_3817.jpeg

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ZPalms
15 hours ago, Palmfarmer said:

Some Copernicia Baileyana have giant fronds, but they dont look too similar. It would not survive your climate either. 

I think Sabal Brazoriensis is a palm you like that would do well in your climate as well as Sabal Uresana that has allready been mentioned. 

I've never heard of Sabal Brazoriensis before, Is the growth rate similar to palmetto?

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D Palm
20 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Pics please

 Posted this earlier in the year.

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Joe NC

I second (or third) the vote for Sabal uresana.  Get the "highlands form",  as it is supposed to be hardier and very blue?  Google "sabal uresana highlands",  and you should be able to find one for sale.

I have one here in SE NC.  It isn't slow, but not winning any races either. It is kind of chugging along at a sabal speed.  Never had an issue with cold damage,  and even at a small size, the foliage is very blue/silver.

Another not on the above list, is Brahea "Super Silver".  It handles the winter cold, and the summer moisture just fine. (unlike any other Brahea I have tried..) However, it is very slow to gain any size.  It puts out many leaves every year,  but they don't seem to be much larger than the previous leaves.  Also when small, they are green.  So it doesn't look like much yet...

I'm completely unimpressed with the Sabal brazoria I have.  I was really really excited about this palm, and went through the effort to hunt one down.  However, mine is turning out to be just kind of meh.  I'll probably like it more once it starts to trunk (in a decade),  but for now it just looks like a minor with a short flower stalk.  Maybe I just have an ugly one?  It is flowering now,  and if you want I can send you some seeds when they are ready.  Spend your $ on getting a S. uresana higlands, and grow the Brazoria from some free seeds (from my ugly palm, haha).  

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Fallen Munk
On 7/31/2021 at 5:16 AM, Chester B said:

His latest video says don’t bother with Bismarkia in his climate. Poor performer. 
 

Bottom line this is a tender palm most suited to Florida and California. 

I've got a couple of seedlings that I germinated last year.  Slower than molasses.  Just getting their second strap leaf.  I bring them in for the winter.

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ZPalms

anyone know a reputable place to buy sabal uresana highlands? I saw a few links on google but theirs no pictures and the prices on that specific website jump around

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D Palm

I germinated a Sabal Urserena last year and put it directly into the ground. It currently has 3 leaf straps about 8” long each. Really slow growing so far. 

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Chester B

My Sabal uresana “highland from” is ridiculously slow. Slowest Sabal I have by a long shot, maybe it needs a few years to work on roots. 

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ZPalms

I'll be getting on eventually, It's better to start now or never because I'm only 22 so I think I'll be able to see it be big one day :blush2:

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