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kinzyjr

Urban Heat Island - Research and Scholarly Articles

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kinzyjr

This thread is created with the intent to share links to research and other resources that assist in quantifying the amount of change to a location's low temperatures due to urbanization and development.  If you come across any good reads, please share.

Climate Central had some interesting content related to the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect:

Summer in the City - Click a city and see the summer temperature difference: https://www.climatecentral.org/wgts/UHI/index.html

Top 20 Urban Heat Islands Report (also attached in case it is moved in the future): https://medialibrary.climatecentral.org/uploads/general/2021_UHI_Report.pdf

New Analysis (July 14th, 2021): https://medialibrary.climatecentral.org/resources/urban-heat-islands

Local Index Score (select your city to see how it ranks): https://www.climatecentral.org/outreach/alert-archive/2021/2021UHI.html

Sample Local Index Score for Orlando, FL:

Local JPG with title

Sample Local Index Score for Tampa, FL:

Local JPG with title

2021_UHI_Report.pdf

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kinzyjr

A study specific to Orlando by Yow and Carbone (may have to sign up to download): https://www.jstor.org/stable/26222242

Some research at UCF (attached as well): https://www.green.ucf.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Islands-in-the-Sun.pdf

Some research on the matter done at USF (too large to attach): https://digital.lib.usf.edu//SFS0027876/00001

An article for those in snowy cities: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6678815/

A nice PDF from Rail-volution (attached):

Islands-in-the-Sun.pdf

rv2008_139d.pdf

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kinzyjr
  1. An interesting read from FSU for those who like maps and figures: https://climatecenter.fsu.edu/topics/specials/floridas-hot-season
  2. A paper on Miami's UHI (attached as well): https://bmcnoldy.rsmas.miami.edu/papers/KZM2018_98AMS_ext.pdf
  3. UHI Basics from the EPA(attached as well): https://www.epa.gov/sites/default/files/2014-06/documents/basicscompendium.pdf
  4. Heat Island Community Actions from the EPA - Local ordinances to reduce UHI: https://www.epa.gov/heatislands/heat-island-community-actions-database
  5. An article from Smithsonian Magazine: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/city-hotter-countryside-urban-heat-island-science-180951985/

Most of the focus of the articles I've read and shared thus far concentrate on reducing the effects of UHI.  I suppose for those of us attempting to squeeze a few degrees of cold protection out of our little slice of paradise, we'd just do the opposite.

KZM2018_98AMS_ext.pdf basicscompendium.pdf

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