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Swolte

Waterlogged Mediterranean fan palm

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Swolte

Does anyone have experience with medi's in poorly drained wet spots?

I have been sweating on a flower bed for my wife this past week and I had to add a deep edging barrier to prevent the &^%x!@*! Bermuda grass from invading everything (about 5/6" in ground). Since the medi is in the lowest point in the bed, I found it completely waterlogged after the rains of the past couple of days. It drains, but slowly, and it will probably be sitting in that swamp for a day or two before it seeps into the soil (heavy sandy loam + clay).  

The medi has been in that spot for years and relatively uncared for (never watered or fertilized). It survived Uri unprotected, btw, so it's a resilient bugger. I wouldn't worry about it if it was a sabal but I am not sure with these species. 

What would you do?

medi water.jpg

Edited by Swolte

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UK_Palms

Be careful of European fans in waterlogged soils. All of mine are doing fine, except the one that is in a spot with poor drainage. It has looked stressed since the spring. Although my drainage still looks to be a bit better than yours there. 

6A007699-657D-4F99-9169-B43F3E735A6E.thumb.jpeg.0c2eb2308aab479bca9d10fe8152ad2a.jpeg

It is pushing a better spear again now but has seemed a bit dodgy over the past month or two.

EE3002C9-75CE-4E90-A738-2CDE302B1E17.thumb.jpeg.851a2c783c01f6b15a66ee7c4f5e2506.jpeg

69314043-DCB6-4B66-9E12-DBF1381FEFC2.thumb.jpeg.4b83419c1a671a5fc9456e63f9b3e90c.jpeg

 

The others that are in the ground near the house are fine, as are the ones in pots. 

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GregVirginia7

I know you’re trying to block the Bermuda grass but maybe a break in the border at the lowest point and a small trench Filled with gravel In and out of the bed to channel water out faster?  

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DAVEinMB

@Swolte I'd move it unless you can do something about the drainage

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UK_Palms
45 minutes ago, DAVEinMB said:

@Swolte I'd move it unless you can do something about the drainage

I think he should plant a bunch of other plants and palms there to help with the drainage. They will drink up a decent proportion of the standing water. That is what I plan to do for my Chameerops that is in poor draining soil. Although that's not to say that it will solve the issue...

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DAVEinMB
25 minutes ago, UK_Palms said:

I think he should plant a bunch of other plants and palms there to help with the drainage. They will drink up a decent proportion of the standing water. That is what I plan to do for my Chameerops that is in poor draining soil. Although that's not to say that it will solve the issue...

That's not a bad idea either, problem is the cham may get lost in the mix

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ahosey01

Mine got root rot from hand watering in Arizona in the summer.

That should say something about their sensitivity to waterlogged soil.

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Jesse PNW

Can you mound up some better draining soil there and raise the elevation of the Cham?

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Dartolution

Agreed with moving it. 

If your winters are anything like ours, a low spot during a wet cool winter in bad draining soils isn't going to last long. 

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Chester B

It's not that big so should be able to move easily.  I have moved them in the past without issues, they don't seem to mind it all.

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knikfar

I'd dig out as much of the loose soil around it as possible, without touching the root zone. Then I'd replace that soil with some of the miracle grow palm and catus soil mix, mixing in a bit of the soil you took out. Then I'd a short trench around the outside of that bed, right up against the edging. Doesn't have to be too deep. I'd fill that in with about six inches a gravel and top that off with landscape fabric and two more inches of the palm and cactus soil mix. That will act as a sort of dry well to hold the standing water until the soil below absorbs it. 

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Swolte

Thanks for all the tips. Decided to get some more well draining soil and lifted the palm for over a foot or so today (before the fall rains return).  
:)

medi lifted.jpg

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Darold Petty

Chamaerops are never in wet, soggy soils.  I support your decision to raise the elevation and use a much faster draining mix.   Here is a habitat shot from Spain.

 

spain 2002_10001.jpg

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Silas_Sancona
On 7/10/2021 at 12:13 PM, Swolte said:



I have been sweating on a flower bed for my wife this past week and I had to add a deep edging barrier to prevent the &^%x!@*! Bermuda grass from invading everything (about 5/6" in ground).
 

medi water.jpg

If there is one thing i can say w/ 100% assurance, it is that you won't win the battle w/ Bermuda, lol.. That stuff can form runners / rhizomes 1-2.5ft ( or more ) underground.

Have a raised brick and concrete planter that sits up against the front of the house to the left of my front door and is about 3ft high..  Cleaned it out as best as possible when i landscaped the yard, down to about 16". Guess what the Bermuda did..  it then weaseled it's way through and under the planter and back out into the yard ..Other clumps of the stuff in the yard that popped up did the reverse and worked their way up into the planter.. Pulled a piece of that stuff that was 8ft in length from that area a couple weeks ago.  Spraying it, repeatedly, did nothing, just made it even angrier than it was when it came back. Survived practically no rain / no water from me  the last two summers / last winter, until seeking vengeance this year.

Since i'm moving and this house is being sold, not going to worry much about trying to remove it.. Just pull what i can to keep it down / keep the yard looking " decent " for whomever buys the place later.  After this experience w/ it, one thing is certain...  When i start the search for my own property in the future, being sure it is Bermuda free is pretty close to the top of a list of requirements.  Awful stuff.

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D Palm

I would move it. The only Mediterranean Fan palms I see thriving in N. Florida are in sunny, well drained, locations. I planted one this summer in almost pure sand, never watered it, doing great. I love it when they are mature and trimmed up with multiple trunks showing.   Maybe a saw palmetto would go great in that location? Home Depot in Jax started carrying them.

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Will Simpson

8E44B179-0273-47F9-A913-8B3CC064FEED.thumb.jpeg.520c94a2f56646bcf0c49f99e9ed75d1.jpegI I

I think you did decent by raising it up . Either that or move it was what I was thinking . 

My Chammy gets hardly any winter rain being that the eave of the house hangs over much of the root system . I give it supplemental water in the warm season . 

There is also well draining soil in that location . 

It is hidden some by the Butia , but it is to  the left . 

 

Edited by Will Simpson

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Merlyn

I'd move it elsewhere and replace it with water-loving palms or other plants.  Even raised up the roots will still grow down into the soggy soil...and get root rot.  It'll never thrive there.

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