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tlow

How much time before winter?

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tlow

We're finishing up our backyard projects with a brand new retaining wall around the house and I have some palms in pots that I plan on putting in the ground immediately upon completion as I have the spots picked out and everything.  The palms are 3G S. Lisa, nice big size to them and really look very nice.  We hope to finish the project sometime in early to mid-August I would think.  Would it make sense to get them in the ground right away to get a few months in the ground, or would you keep them in the pots and plant in spring first thing next year?  Essentially, I'm trying to figure out how much time they need in ground before winter.  Thanks in advance!

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oasis371

Personally, I don't see the need to rush the project.  Palms do quite well in containers and I don't know if mid-August is so great for planting a Sabal in Texas, and fall planting is probably not ideal either (especially seeing how freakish winter temps have been recently).  I would hold off this the coming spring already. 

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Chester B

I was told by the local palm nursery late august is the cut off for planting palms around here.  Different climate though, and just one opinion.  

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kinzyjr

In the Dallas area, I would definitely wait until spring.

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Swolte

There's still a lot of heat after August. I'd probably plant it but I would make sure to protect it during the coming winter. If you are not comfortable providing good winter protection, I'd probably wait till spring.  
:)

Edited by Swolte
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tlow

Thanks all.  I think the Lisas will be held onto until next spring to plant.  They're doing very well so no need to rush into this.  I also have another five Louisianas, Brazoriensis, and Minors that will end up in this retaining wall so those may wait until next year as well.

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maskedmole

If it was me I would just plant them and not worry about it. I have personally planted a needle palm and windmill palm in the fall time here in Tennessee, in November. And the palm trees made it out fine and they are still here today around 3-4 years later! Despite information saying they wouldn't make it... I just took care of them and protected them during extra cold events. It was a mild November as most November's are here. 

Now ironically, whenever I bought the palm trees, the seller on ebay felt bad for me for them coming so late in the year so they sent me an extra one. The note said to wait until spring to plant and keep in a pot. I decided with the extra free one I would do what the note said and I would baby it.... Well, it ended up dying for whatever reason and the other 2 in ground survived. Oh sweet irony...

Then again I don't exactly have a knack for keeping potted plants/indoor plants alive besides cacti.. If you aren't good with potted plants then definitely I say plant them.  August should be plenty of time. I just wouldn't plant it past November though and would make sure it was mild weather and not super cold or snowy. November I think is about the absolute cutoff point if you are crazy like me. Potted plants have their own special needs and set of problems.. You have to water them a lot and make sure they get enough sun, get the right kind of soil, and sometimes they just seem to die or not be happy even if you try to take care of them, etc.

Edited by maskedmole
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Jimhardy

I had a similar experience for (possibly) different reasons...

My first  3 Trachys off E-bay came in late Oct,I planted one and left the other 2 in pots...

the issue is that bare root palms on the porch in November did not have warm enough temps for root growth..

they both died in the house over winter but the one I planted 11/1 did great,I was just careful watering it in the cold temps.

I also planted a small Waggie in late November and it did fine.

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tlow
33 minutes ago, Jimhardy said:

I had a similar experience for (possibly) different reasons...

My first  3 Trachys off E-bay came in late Oct,I planted one and left the other 2 in pots...

the issue is that bare root palms on the porch in November did not have warm enough temps for root growth..

they both died in the house over winter but the one I planted 11/1 did great,I was just careful watering it in the cold temps.

I also planted a small Waggie in late November and it did fine.

Well frustratingly enough, we haven't even started the project yet.... These two S. Lisa are just waiting, hanging outside in pots putting new spears out.  I would be willing to be even if i planted them in September they would be just fine.

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Gator

I usually have my first frost week of Halloween.

BUT....last year..... it came early on September 28th.  

I wont wrap my palms until mid-December....and .... I usually keep them wrapped until Mid-Feb

Not looking forward to winter...but the break from yardwork is nice

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amh

The danger of frost usually begins for me the last week of October, but I have overwintered Sabal minors outside in pots for years, only bringing them inside when temperatures would be below 14F. I don't know the true hardiness of Sabal lisa, but it should't be a big chore to protect your palms December through March.

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newtopalmsMD

My overwintering of young needles, brazorias, trachys and minors has them in pots outside in the sun, and brought into the garage if night temperatures will be around 15F or prolonged 20F (to be safe), or if icy precipitation predicted.  These palms don't do well as house plants (not enough humidity) and there is not as much of a change in temperature moving them from un heated garage to outside as opposed to in the house to outside.  I also worry about breaking dormancy if they are in a heated house for any time.

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