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Jcalvin

Arenga Engleri Question

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Jcalvin

I have a great Palm and Tropical nursery I go to get some of my plants called Dixie Acres in Folkston, Ga/ about 15 minutes from the Florida line.  Today I was talking to George, the owner, and he said he’s getting a number of palms and plants in next week. One of them was dwarf sugar palm. 
 

Does anyone have any experience with these in 9a/8b? I looked in the freeze data forum, but there wasn't much info there. 

 

 

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Fusca

I purchased a 15-gal Arenga engleri in December 2019 (5' overall height) and planted here in 9a under live oak canopy.  It did OK but did not grow much for me.  It probably wanted more water than I gave it even though I watered it often.  I protected it (minimally - just blankets) during our February freeze seeing 9F and 13F on consecutive nights.  It didn't make it.  A larger one planted at Oblate School of Theology here in SA went through similar temperatures and is recovering from the suckers.

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Jcalvin
26 minutes ago, Fusca said:

I purchased a 15-gal Arenga engleri in December 2019 (5' overall height) and planted here in 9a under live oak canopy.  It did OK but did not grow much for me.  It probably wanted more water than I gave it even though I watered it often.  I protected it (minimally - just blankets) during our February freeze seeing 9F and 13F on consecutive nights.  It didn't make it.  A larger one planted at Oblate School of Theology here in SA went through similar temperatures and is recovering from the suckers.

That sucks. It’s such a beautiful, ornate palm. Is “SA” San Antonio? 
 

I figured it would probably die back below 22f or so, but maybe 20f if it was protected by a canopy.  But, I just don’t know enough about it. And, I don’t want to sink a lot of money into something that’s going to need a lot of care every winter. 
 

How frost tolerant is it? 

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kinzyjr

There was one in Zephyrhills that got hit with 17F and survived.  If you try one in Brunswick, the best chance for success is up against a south facing wall and under canopy.  There are 29 observations in the Cold Hardiness Master Data spreadsheet: https://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/61358-0000-cold-hardiness-observation-master-data/

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Fusca
4 hours ago, Jcalvin said:

That sucks. It’s such a beautiful, ornate palm. Is “SA” San Antonio? 

Yes, sorry I should have been more specific - I'm in San Antonio.  There's also a San Angelo and a Santa Anna in Texas but neither are in 9a.  I was hoping it would be long-term in that spot but wasn't counting on a once-in-a-century event!  Probably would have saved it if I had more lights at the time...

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jimmyt
46 minutes ago, Fusca said:

Yes, sorry I should have been more specific - I'm in San Antonio.  There's also a San Angelo and a Santa Anna in Texas but neither are in 9a.  I was hoping it would be long-term in that spot but wasn't counting on a once-in-a-century event!  Probably would have saved it if I had more lights at the time...

@Fusca don’t forget about San Augustine, TX.  HeHe! :)

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Merlyn

On looking at kinzjr's spreadsheet, Arenga Engleri seems pretty hardy for 9B.  Most observations seem to have up to 20% damage in the low 20s, and serious damage or death below 20.  They are relatively slow growers, at least compared to fast palms like Syagrus or Caryota.  But in 9A if it takes only a little damage at 22-24F it should do ok.  Just make sure you don't get a Tremula.  They look almost identical but have paired or triple/quad clustered leaves near the base.  My Tremula took about 50-75% burn with frost and 29F, while an identically sized Engleri 10' away took zero damage.

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KDubU

I have planted 5 Arenga Engleri on my property just down the road from you on Amelia Island. Two are closer to the house and driveway and three are understory of some oak and pine. I am fairly confident they will do okay in 9a but you never truly know. Weather is more and more erratic so one rolls the dice and enjoy them while you can. They are more hardy than many other palms for 9a and I really like their look. I say go for it and give it a shot and thanks for the name of another nursery I can visit! New to the area so have not found all the good places yet.

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Keys6505

Here's mine in 9a Houston.  I only bought it last spring so this was it's first winter for me and of course it was the coldest in 30+ years, so basically a 8b winter.  Was completely defoliated after 15 degrees with protection but is rebounding.  Most of the trunks survived but it's slow.  It's a shame, was probably the nicest, most tropical looking palm in my yard and it was well above the 6' fence before the freeze.

20210627_140529.jpg

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Jesse PNW

I've got 2 that I'm trying here in 8A.  I know they're probably short term.  If I'm not out of town when cold weather hits, I will protect them.  (I've got some ryukyuensis seed, need to figure out how to germinate)

I did a lot of reading about these prior to purchasing, it seems like engleri's growing in shade (ie under cover) do much better than ones "in full sun" (ie, out in the open).  That seems to make a big difference.  

I hate how much conflicting information there is online about palm hardiness.  I've learned not to trust anyone trying to sell me a palm.  Commercial nurseries like to advertise that their palms are super-fast growing, hardy in Antarctica, will show up 6' tall in a 1' box, and will make you breakfast in the morning.  Just my experience.  

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ZPalms
34 minutes ago, Jesse PNW said:

I've got 2 that I'm trying here in 8A.  I know they're probably short term.  If I'm not out of town when cold weather hits, I will protect them.  (I've got some ryukyuensis seed, need to figure out how to germinate)

I did a lot of reading about these prior to purchasing, it seems like engleri's growing in shade (ie under cover) do much better than ones "in full sun" (ie, out in the open).  That seems to make a big difference.  

I hate how much conflicting information there is online about palm hardiness.  I've learned not to trust anyone trying to sell me a palm.  Commercial nurseries like to advertise that their palms are super-fast growing, hardy in Antarctica, will show up 6' tall in a 1' box, and will make you breakfast in the morning.  Just my experience.  

:floor: very true

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Tropicdoc

FWIW my 3 Arenga engleri saw 21 F this winter here in south Louisiana. They are under live oak canopy. Only 1 was wrapped and had no heat. All fronds survived but the new fronds that came out were deformed. They will all live though. They are not the fastest palms but look nice in the right setting

image.jpg

image.jpg

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EJ;)
On 6/26/2021 at 9:54 AM, Jcalvin said:

I have a great Palm and Tropical nursery I go to get some of my plants called Dixie Acres in Folkston, Ga/ about 15 minutes from the Florida line.  Today I was talking to George, the owner, and he said he’s getting a number of palms and plants in next week. One of them was dwarf sugar palm. 
 

Does anyone have any experience with these in 9a/8b? I looked in the freeze data forum, but there wasn't much info there. 

 

 

Just added one to my jungle. I'm in zone 9b. So far so good. But the winter will tell all. 

Snapchat-379289853.jpg

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Tropicdoc

Should be bulletproof in 9b

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necturus

I'd give it a go under canopy. Why not? They're beautiful palms and can come back from severe freezes, albeit slowly.

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