Jump to content
CrescentCity

Palms for New Orleans (9a/9b)

Recommended Posts

CrescentCity

I am looking for some tropical looking palms to add to my new home. I am looking at both  archontophoenix cunninghamiana, chambeyronia macrocarpa and burretiokentia hapala. Pictured is my 15g king that has made it through two winters straight here with no protection. Any recommendations would be helpful.

61A506D6-AE9E-4720-8B55-3B7AFFE98C62.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JLM

That archontophoenix would probably do better in the ground, although it will grow pretty fast. Once it get so big you wont be able to protect when you need to, then you have a dead palm. Would probably go with a Mule palm for an in ground palm, they look sort of coconuty. If you want something common do a Queen or two, but again they are common and are messy when they get big. Otherwise you might be better off keeping some potted tropicals, like Hyophorbe lagenicaulis, Adonidia merrillii, Ravenea rivularis, the list goes on.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xenon

None of the palms you listed are anywhere near "safe" in NOLA, king palms and anything else with a crownshaft included. You might get a few years, perhaps a decade out of them if you're lucky. 2018 killed all tropical stuff in NOLA and before that there was 2010. 

Majesty palm (Ravenea rivularis) and pygmy dates are the most "tropical" palms that are somewhat borderline hardy in the "near long term". There are some that have squeaked by in the past 20 years. Queen palms and mule palms are hardy barring a 1989 style cold event. Imo, NOLA probably has some of the best looking queen palms in the US South when not occasionally cold damaged. 

 

Edited by Xenon
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Teegurr

Try a Bismarckia nobilis and a Beccariophoenix alfredii.

New Orleans proper is a mid 9b, so you should be good with occasional protection of the Beccario.

Edited by Teegurr
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sabal_Louisiana

Consider your local microclimate. If you live out by the Lake you can probably get away with growing or experimenting with less cold hardy palms than say, the West Bank suburbs.

Also, while New Orleans doesn't freeze much, the winters can be windy, chilly and damp/wet. That can play into things as well. For instance, I've heard that Beccariophoenix alfredii doesn't do well in wet freezes, even if they are light in nature.

Anyway, what about some Dypsis? Some people grow Triangle Palms in NO but they did burn in the mid 20s that were experienced this past February. Dypsis decipiens is supposed to be a bit more cold tolerant. And the very nice looking 'Orange Crush' can probably take some brief sub-freezing cold.

Several kinds of Livistona besides L. chinensis would make it I bet. Ribbon Palm would probably work if you have the money and can find one.

If you're really daring you could try Foxtails and Royals, which have survived in south Texas and Florida with temps in the low 20s, albeit with heavy damage.

A few people plant Fishtails (Caryota) around New Orleans. They burn alot with a hard freeze but I've seen them eventually come back with time from the upper teens.

 

Edited by Sabal_Louisiana
edit
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Teegurr
2 hours ago, Sabal_Louisiana said:

Consider your local microclimate. If you live out by the Lake you can probably get away with growing or experimenting with less cold hardy palms than say, the West Bank suburbs.

Also, while New Orleans doesn't freeze much, the winters can be windy, chilly and damp/wet. That can play into things as well. For instance, I've heard that Beccariophoenix alfredii doesn't do well in wet freezes, even if they are light in nature.

Anyway, what about some Dypsis? Some people grow Triangle Palms in NO but they did burn in the mid 20s that were experienced this past February. Dypsis decipiens is supposed to be a bit more cold tolerant. And the very nice looking 'Orange Crush' can probably take some brief sub-freezing cold.

Several kinds of Livistona besides L. chinensis would make it I bet. Ribbon Palm would probably work if you have the money and can find one.

If you're really daring you could try Foxtails and Royals, which have survived in south Texas and Florida with temps in the low 20s, albeit with heavy damage.

A few people plant Fishtails (Caryota) around New Orleans. They burn alot with a hard freeze but I've seen them eventually come back with time from the upper teens.

 

Maybe even Euterpe edulis could be tried. Make sure not to take off leaf bases, though, as pink rot can happen that way.

Oh, don't forget Syagrus weddelliana.

Chamaedoreas (cataractarum, metallica, seifrizii, tepejilote) could also work

Edited by Teegurr
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kailua_Krish

If you have shaded areas under oak trees your choices greatly increase. Kerriodoxa does very well in 9a/b and so do many Arenga. Beccariophoneix does better with high canopy to protect from frost. If no canopy I would establish one with some of the cocosoid hybrids like BxP and JxS and Mules but if you have the space its hard to beat the canopy by an actual tree. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CrescentCity

My parents had three fishtails that grew like weeds for 15 yrs and were roughly 20 ft tall in Metairie. They froze this year, simply not being protected, but are growing back nicely.  I do live out by the lake so my choices may be better. It’s a mid 9b and it does barely freeze south of the lake. Winters here are cool and wet. Always in the 50s with dips down into the 40s. So something that can handle swampy and wet feet would be ideal. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowNight030

I’ve seen large majesties occasionally in the city, 2  of them being upwards of 15/20 feet tall. Pygmy dates are pretty reliable between hard freezes, and can be hit or miss during those freezes. Queens do very well in the city, many of them surviving the recent arctic blasts. I’ve seen people try royals and foxtails, but few survive long term. Grand isle can support them, but not Nola. I’ve seen bismarck palms do well in the city, there are nice ones at the zoo. Depending on where you are will give you a good idea on what can survive. In Metairie, For example, I’ve seen large plumeria and large fruiting papaya and even a mango tree around 10 feet. In the French quarter there was a large Norfolk pine in a courtyard, but I don’t believe it made it after the 2018 freeze as it disappeared after it. On magazine street theres a huge jacaranda

Edited by ShadowNight030

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
D Palm

From my Florida observations, Royal Palm is way more likely to recover from a 5-10 year once dip into 20’s over a king or foxtail. Bismarck would be a less risky option if you have the yard space. Queens tend to look bad if neglected. I do enjoy sabals even though plentiful in the gulf states.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zoltan
On 6/8/2021 at 3:11 PM, JLM said:

That archontophoenix would probably do better in the ground, although it will grow pretty fast. Once it get so big you wont be able to protect when you need to, then you have a dead palm. Would probably go with a Mule palm for an in ground palm, they look sort of coconuty. If you want something common do a Queen or two, but again they are common and are messy when they get big. Otherwise you might be better off keeping some potted tropicals, like Hyophorbe lagenicaulis, Adonidia merrillii, Ravenea rivularis, the list goes on.

Just get some bottle palms.im in Jacksonville FL usda 9a ...they probably will burn leaves but they return if you protect it well...bottle palms are tropical looking and moderate grower max hight 12 feet I have them on my yard for years.at winter I use 4 irrigation pipe around and wrap it w plastic film around very well just leave an 1 inch gab at bottom for air...don't worry to water at cold at all..they will return just perfect at spring.you can start to protect them like when temp drop below 40 ..and they will be just fine ..leave protected till spring..and just wrap wrap FILm around so it stable wind won't blow it...pay attention leaves or plant itself won't touch plastic film ..so make frame around ...just hammer down irrigation pipes and wrap it..wraps are available in Lowes or home depot

IMG_20210830_145939909_HDR.jpg

IMG_20210830_150147377_HDR.jpg

IMG_20210830_145951819_HDR.jpg

IMG_20210830_150503134_HDR.jpg

IMG_20210830_150124885_HDR.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zoltan

Place to side like west side or where sun reach full sun ..maybe area where it get east and west sun like on side ..you can place the close to house and also you can out 2 -3 together they will show more tropical .you can get them from any nursery or even Lowes...get a larger maybe for like 40 $

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zoltan

This palm really easy to protect because they not growing tall tall ..even in Miami at Versace entrance this palms in huge pots. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Steve the palmreader
13 minutes ago, Zoltan said:

This palm really easy to protect because they not growing tall tall ..even in Miami at Versace entrance this palms in huge pots. 

Nice, you should try Thrinax radiata 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JLM
5 hours ago, Zoltan said:

Just get some bottle palms.im in Jacksonville FL usda 9a ...they probably will burn leaves but they return if you protect it well...bottle palms are tropical looking and moderate grower max hight 12 feet I have them on my yard for years.at winter I use 4 irrigation pipe around and wrap it w plastic film around very well just leave an 1 inch gab at bottom for air...don't worry to water at cold at all..they will return just perfect at spring.you can start to protect them like when temp drop below 40 ..and they will be just fine ..leave protected till spring..and just wrap wrap FILm around so it stable wind won't blow it...pay attention leaves or plant itself won't touch plastic film ..so make frame around ...just hammer down irrigation pipes and wrap it..wraps are available in Lowes or home depot

IMG_20210830_145939909_HDR.jpg

IMG_20210830_150147377_HDR.jpg

IMG_20210830_145951819_HDR.jpg

IMG_20210830_150503134_HDR.jpg

IMG_20210830_150124885_HDR.jpg

Id be tempted to do that, although i decided to plant my foxtail for experimental purposes, Bottle palm is the second one up if the foxtail fails this winter. How long have they been in the ground, and what other palms are you zone pushing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zoltan

These bottles this years 3 th season. I got 2 triangles those are 3 season also ,and i jsut got 2 Pembanas they are maybe 3 wks in ground about 7 gal...It will be forst time winter for those ,so im testing it.Do you know anything about those as cold tolarance? I have like 3 sugar palms they dont get any protection either queens, I also have lady palms few but they are totally cold tolerant and i have a bismark kinda small few gallon i never protect it ,i have it in ground for years at front 

Try to get a 45 gal Pembana i just would like to get more date on them...  1 mile from my home there are some Dypsis Acera at church entrance and i was told Pembana similar to it as for cold so i wish to try a huge and place it at front....Just wish someone in this zone can give me some hope Bottle is great they not so sensitive and very easy to manage it...If you group them together which i didnt :-(  it can be a great focus point..And that  way just need to build 1 protection all under 1 roof lol. They usually dont have more than 4-5 leaves and they push that out by the end of the season then start again at spring.  They were really small when i got them 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zoltan

i know foxtail wouldnt make it here. So i never tried i was told king ok but they grow fast then what im going to do protect ?> so i stayed w bottles 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zoltan

got some heliconias called  ice and fire they are cold hardy ,tehy may freeze but return super fast like nothing happend,didnt flower to me but its ok i have it by the fence for like privacy . Got i think called papayas

and i have lotus banana first year in and suppose to be cold hardy

Also got red flame tower palms 2 , 1 on patio kinda tall another small outside by side of the house covered by heliconias... lots of bromeliads  yes i got pygmys no issue w those ever or if very small burn .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
howfam
On 6/9/2021 at 12:48 PM, CrescentCity said:

My parents had three fishtails that grew like weeds for 15 yrs and were roughly 20 ft tall in Metairie. They froze this year, simply not being protected, but are growing back nicely.  I do live out by the lake so my choices may be better. It’s a mid 9b and it does barely freeze south of the lake. Winters here are cool and wet. Always in the 50s with dips down into the 40s. So something that can handle swampy and wet feet would be ideal. 

Which species of Fishtail Palms did your parents have? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zoltan

Great info....At what lake in Jacksonville Zip?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...