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GregVirginia7

Butia capitata var. bonnetti

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GregVirginia7

Anyone know a grower who sells Butia capitata var. bonnetti? I really want to try a pinnate and this one appears to be a reasonable candidate.

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Fusca

What about Butia eriospatha?  Supposed to be the hardiest of the Butia species - hardy down to -12C  (10F) according to Palmpedia.net and might be the same palm as B. bonnetti.  You might have better luck finding one.  Texas Cold Hardy Palms used to sell them and might still have some.

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GregVirginia7
1 hour ago, Fusca said:

What about Butia eriospatha?  Supposed to be the hardiest of the Butia species - hardy down to -12C  (10F) according to Palmpedia.net and might be the same palm as B. bonnetti.  You might have better luck finding one.  Texas Cold Hardy Palms used to sell them and might still have some.

Will look into that...thank you...

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Swolte
4 hours ago, Fusca said:

What about Butia eriospatha?  Supposed to be the hardiest of the Butia species - hardy down to -12C  (10F) according to Palmpedia.net and might be the same palm as B. bonnetti.  You might have better luck finding one.  Texas Cold Hardy Palms used to sell them and might still have some

Been hunting for that one for a while. Last I spoke to TCHP, he was out of these. Let me know if you find a good source!
:)

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Vic

Var bonetti is not an accepted name. I think what was once referred to as bonetti is actually catarinensis, which is much smaller growing than eriospatha but probably equal in cold hardiness. 

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GregVirginia7
5 hours ago, Vic said:

Var bonetti is not an accepted name. I think what was once referred to as bonetti is actually catarinensis, which is much smaller growing than eriospatha but probably equal in cold hardiness. 

Thank you, Vic...I went ahead and ordered some catarinensis seeds...any special germination techniques you may know of for this palm?

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Vic
On 6/2/2021 at 8:33 PM, GregVirginia7 said:

Thank you, Vic...I went ahead and ordered some catarinensis seeds...any special germination techniques you may know of for this palm?

I’ve germinated catarinensis in the past, but they are slow and difficult for me compared to pretty much all cocoid seeds I have germinated. If you can find a reliable source of fresh seed then you may have better luck. 

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Dartolution
On 6/2/2021 at 2:33 PM, GregVirginia7 said:

Thank you, Vic...I went ahead and ordered some catarinensis seeds...any special germination techniques you may know of for this palm?

haha. Patience. 

There are also methods for cracking the outer "shell" and exposing the endocarp/endosperm that result in faster germination at the cost of potentially damaging the embryo and inviting fungal infections. 

I can't remember if catarinensis is a southern species, but it may require 10C fluctuations in day/night temperatures to germinate more readily. 

A 75% perlite/25% Vermiculite  combination is helpful for germination. 

 

I tried the shell cracking method on a bunch of odorata's, and learned that this method is not for me. 

I personally believe it best to clean the seed, and germinate it in sterile conditions in perlite/vermiculite combo as mentioned above. 

Above all, patience because as @Vic stated they are slow. 

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Fusca

Butia catarinensis is native to the southernmost states of Brasil - Santa Catarina (hence the species name) and Rio Grande do Sul.  Both are well south of the tropics and often experience winter lows below freezing.  I've visited both states and have seen them growing there.

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GregVirginia7
7 hours ago, Dartolution said:

haha. Patience. 

There are also methods for cracking the outer "shell" and exposing the endocarp/endosperm that result in faster germination at the cost of potentially damaging the embryo and inviting fungal infections. 

I can't remember if catarinensis is a southern species, but it may require 10C fluctuations in day/night temperatures to germinate more readily. 

A 75% perlite/25% Vermiculite  combination is helpful for germination. 

 

I tried the shell cracking method on a bunch of odorata's, and learned that this method is not for me. 

I personally believe it best to clean the seed, and germinate it in sterile conditions in perlite/vermiculite combo as mentioned above. 

Above all, patience because as @Vic stated they are slow. 

Oh, perfect...here I am, aging as we speak and their germination is slow and growth probably makes my McCurtain look like kudzu In comparison...just kidding...sort of...looked everywhere for even a strapling but no luck...I have managed to germinate and plant Sabal minor seeds but that’s child’s play I know...may have bitten off a bit more than I can chew with this one. Will certainly give them a good try after some reading (that frankly boggles my mind in most cases) but there’s plenty of time to read and reread and read again.

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Dartolution

@GregVirginia7 They are slow to germinate, but once they get out of strap leaf stage I would imagine they are moderate growers. Could be wrong. 

Love Butia's, and wish I knew of someone in the IPS that specializes in growing species of Butia. 

You might find a PalmTalk member who has these already. Maybe... 

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GregVirginia7
On 6/4/2021 at 5:20 AM, Vic said:

I’ve germinated catarinensis in the past, but they are slow and difficult for me compared to pretty much all cocoid seeds I have germinated. If you can find a reliable source of fresh seed then you may have better luck. 

Yes...I’ll give it a shot after some reading... I know what the seeds look like so when they arrive, if they don’t look like catarinensis seeds I’ll know the seller isn’t reputable...not a good way to determine reputable but it’s a start. Then the float test, then the soak then on to germination method/medium...this is where the lesson begins...

This is one of my Sabal minor seed successes. Won’t claim any prizes since my only participation was to poke a whole in dirt And drop the seed in it...fruit jacket and all. But the catarinensis will be far more involved and interesting to try. If I succeed, I’ll announce the results.

image.thumb.jpg.3d17e095a3ee5348a73e1eab06724acd.jpg

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