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Mr_Marojejya

Anyone grow Dypsis andilamenensis? Anyone know if any are available? kept? How it would best be kept?

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Mr_Marojejya

I fell in love with this palm and hope to grow it one day. I think it is a stunner. I hope it will be more widely grown one day.  It has been discovered for quite a while so I'm surprised it isn't more widely grown any ideas why? Does no one like it or something.

i find it far more attractive than D. scandens because this appears to have much wider leaflets, what do you think

If anyone grows it, would you tell your story?

(or if you have any seeds...?)

 

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PalmatierMeg

That Dypsis species is a new one to me. What a great looking palm. It resembles Dypsis nodifera, I believe.

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