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boaterboat

Arborist in Central TX

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boaterboat

I have a cousin who would like an arborist to look at his palm in Central Texas, just west of Austin. Any recommendations would be appreciated. 

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Edited by boaterboat
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boaterboat

I’ve given the hydrogen peroxide advice. I assume it is applied as it comes in the bottle?  

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Collectorpalms

Why? It’s alive. Looks past the worst. Just give it a Month of May and June Temperatures and it will have Several leaves by July 4th.

Looks like a very nice Washingtonia Filifera.

Palms are not really trees, avoid an arborists with a chain saw in truck.

Edited by Collectorpalms
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Collectorpalms

Only thing I can add is Continually check for any soft spots. Push on it in several areas including just below the crown. It should be sturdy. 
When you thump the clear trunk with the soft part of your fist (below meristem) it should sound like a watermelon! Full of water. Gives off a vibration. 

when you get a dull thud or soft spot it’s bad

That palm looks perfect!

Edited by Collectorpalms

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Will Simpson

I would cut horizontally across at about where the shorter boots start at the top . I would then check out the center . If it is mush I would cut a little lower until there is solid tissue . I would think there would be a lot of new frond growth by now in central Texas , so that is why I'm a little concerned  . 

Be careful to cut only a couple inched at a time across the top . Hopefully you find some live tissue and then you can do the peroxide thing  at that point . 

Good luck to your cousin . 

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Collectorpalms
19 minutes ago, Will Simpson said:

I would cut horizontally across at about where the shorter boots start at the top . I would then check out the center . If it is mush I would cut a little lower until there is solid tissue . I would think there would be a lot of new frond growth by now in central Texas , so that is why I'm a little concerned  . 

Be careful to cut only a couple inched at a time across the top . Hopefully you find some live tissue and then you can do the peroxide thing  at that point . 

Good luck to your cousin . 

No the Washingtonia that were damaged the most by zero F are just now visibly growing here, I can see green on that one. It’s very positive. Only reason to cut it in my opinion is if the green dries up. 

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Will Simpson

I hope it greens up a little more soon . I had a Palmetto in my prolonged cold in 2018  , and  I thought I saw a little green down in the crown but  by the time I cut it in May it was a stinky mess . I do see some green so I hope you are right .

Thanks 

 

 

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