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High Life Tony

Noob In SW Louisiana Needs Help (transplanted, 2 hurricanes, and a freeze!)

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High Life Tony

Hello All - I’m looking for advice on how to proceed to ensure the best chances for my plant’s survival & growth.  As the title states, last June 21st the plant was saved from the roadside in my neighborhood.  I read not to use the PalmFood product for at least 6mo post-transplant b/c the plant is still recovering from shock. I used some as directed last December.  Prior to that, was hurricanes in Aug & Oct and then the HARD freezes & frozen precip for several days in Feb of this year.  Below are the transplant pic & today.
The yard “soil” is hard clay & usually for other plants & shrubs - gypsum and/or planting w/ potting soil is needed due to hardness of the clay.

Thank you in advance for advice! 
 

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Chester B

What you have is commonly referred to as a Sago palm which isn't a palm, rather a cycad - Cycas revoluta in fact.  It looks like it's sending out a new flush of growth, so should look great again in no time.  I would remove all the old dead fronds, and clear the grass and weeds from the base of it and add some mulch so they don't come back.  These are very tough plants so I'm not sure you really have much to do to make it happy.  I'll let some locals chime in on how they do things.

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Merlyn

I agree with Chester, cut off the old dead fronds and remove the weeds.  Be careful to not touch the new fronds as they are growing, it can permanently distort them.  Wait until it has finished and "hardened off," i.e. the leaves have completely grown out and become rigid.  Then add some slow-release fertilizer.  Any generic "palm special" type should work for a Revoluta.  A handful sprinkled nearby should help it recover fully.

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High Life Tony

Thanks for the tips, Chester & Merlyn - I was happy to see the new fronds today when I went home at lunch!  Happy to clean her up & support the growth! 

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JLM
17 hours ago, Merlyn said:

I agree with Chester, cut off the old dead fronds and remove the weeds.  Be careful to not touch the new fronds as they are growing, it can permanently distort them.  Wait until it has finished and "hardened off," i.e. the leaves have completely grown out and become rigid.  Then add some slow-release fertilizer.  Any generic "palm special" type should work for a Revoluta.  A handful sprinkled nearby should help it recover fully.

Haha i did not realize that you shouldnt touch the new flush until it hardens off, yeah some of the fronds look strange now :laugh2:

@High Life Tony, do exactly what they said above, you should have a nice looking Sago within only a few weeks. You are lucky, because most places in Texas are not looking to have semi normal looking palms and cycads again until later this summer or longer.

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Merlyn
2 hours ago, JLM said:

Haha i did not realize that you shouldnt touch the new flush until it hardens off, yeah some of the fronds look strange now :laugh2:

Occasionally mine (mostly Encephalartos) end up with slightly distorted fronds.  Usually it's due to flushing when it's too cold or super windy.  A recent giant Hildebrandtii flushed, and it was hot and dry for an entire month.  I should have watered it some by hand because the tops got a little twisted up and a few already have sunburnt leaflets.  But my wife has a habit of walking by and saying, "Ooooo that's so cool, it's unfurling like a fern!"  And then she tries to fondle them!  You can look, but don't touch!  :D

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JLM
2 minutes ago, Merlyn said:

Occasionally mine (mostly Encephalartos) end up with slightly distorted fronds.  Usually it's due to flushing when it's too cold or super windy.  A recent giant Hildebrandtii flushed, and it was hot and dry for an entire month.  I should have watered it some by hand because the tops got a little twisted up and a few already have sunburnt leaflets.  But my wife has a habit of walking by and saying, "Ooooo that's so cool, it's unfurling like a fern!"  And then she tries to fondle them!  You can look, but don't touch!  :D

Ive touched at least one frond from every flush for the past couple of years, because otherwise you cant touch a sago without getting poked! lol

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High Life Tony

Thanks for the tips again - looking good so far! So exciting - I’m sure the sun/mid-80s have helped in last week or so! 

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High Life Tony

Still going! ;) Thanks to the Forum responders! 

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